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According this this topic https://stackoverflow.blog/2019/11/13/were-rewarding-the-question-askers/ question upvote gives 10 reputation instead of 5. But it doesn't mention any decrease rules. As I understand this change can only increase the reputation but my reputation was decreased for ~300. What could be the cause of decrease?

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While the changes were being made, there were also some very old glitches in how reputation was being calculated that were corrected at the same time. This affected only a small number of people, resulting in a group of several hundred users receiving a net drop in reputation once it was being calculated correctly again.

  • Is there a way to check the diff before/after to find the decrease cause? – Random Nov 15 at 18:10
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    There is no way for you to check your own reputation change. However, moderators can see this information in a history log. Your reputation was 2295 before the recalc, and it was 2650 after the recalc. So...it didn't decrease at all. You evidently aren't one of the users affected by the issues that animuson is referring to. Lucky you! @Random – Cody Gray Nov 15 at 18:29
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    @CodyGray Out of curiosity, is there any specific reason why that history isn't available to users on their profile? – Chris Baker Nov 15 at 19:05
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    @Chris I’m not entirely sure, but if I were to hazard a guess, it would be the very boring explanation that there exists no place in the UI to display this information. Moderators can see it because we can see a detailed log of all events that have affected the account. Reputation recalcs (including the automated ones that happen all the time) are tracked and show up to us there. This history log isn’t shown to regular users, even for their own accounts. From a bigger picture perspective, the answer is likely that it doesn’t matter. The important figure is your actual rep. – Cody Gray Nov 15 at 21:10
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    Can you not do it yourself by downloading the database or has that been stripped if the info? – gman Nov 16 at 16:49

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