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There are a series of common questions that, in a sense, all reduce to using binary floating point without understand it. The usual way of handling those questions is to mark them as duplicates of Is floating point math broken?. That venerable (over 10 years old) and excellent (2765 score) question and its pages of answers cover a lot of material. It is a good general reference, but it may be a bit intimidating for someone new to floating point, and it may be difficult to find the answer to a specific question among the wealth of material.

I would like to suggest adding some questions and answers for specific forms of floating point confusion. They should all reference the current stock question for background, but each discuss a narrow aspect of floating point issues. Questions that match one of the specialized questions would be marked as duplicates of that question, rather than of the general question.

The meta question is how to go about proposing and discussing this idea. Is this the right forum?

Here are some examples of topics. It will take some work to formulate a proper question and answer for each, and that can wait until there is agreement in principle. Indeed, it may be better to wait for a real question in each category, and turn it into a canonical question and answer rather than just marking it as a duplicate.

  • Lack of exact representation of short, simple decimal fractions such as 0.1
  • Most languages and libraries round floating point numbers on output
  • When is it useful to switch to decimal or rational arithmetic?
  • Floating point addition and multiplication are not associative.
  • How precise is precise enough? (I see people worrying about a difference of one part in 1015 in physical quantity that cannot possibly be measured that precisely)
  • When is 32 bit float better than 64 bit float? (not often).
  • My programming language only has integer and binary floating point types, no decimal or rational library. How should I implement accounting in dollars and cents with specific rounding rules such as SSUTA?

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I tried constructing a Q&A, and posted it for comment and review as Is this a good canonical floating point question and answer?. It currently has 10 downvotes. The negative comments relate to the basic concept of adding simple canonical questions, not the specifics of that Q&A.

Given the number of downvotes, I do not think this project is feasible. I am sad, because I know how unusable the canonical question with its 66 answers would have been for me 50 years ago, when I was first learning about floating point rounding.

  • Yes, this is the right place :) ... What other questions could there be that do not fall under your "lost precision" subcategory? – Jonas Wilms Nov 1 at 20:53
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    @JonasWilms All the questions are about "lost precision", but in different situations and different ways. I will edit the meta question to show some of the possibilities. – Patricia Shanahan Nov 1 at 21:08
  • As someone once pointed out, many questions are of the form: "I want a solution not an explanation why this is happening." For example, in accounting and finance. – peterSO Nov 1 at 23:32
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    @peterSO I think one question should be on when to abandon binary floating point in favor of using a decimal or rational data type. Doing so can be useful in some situations, especially in accounting, but is not a magic wand to fix all rounding problems. – Patricia Shanahan Nov 1 at 23:39
  • @PatriciaShanahan: Your programming language has integer and floating-point data types, no decimal or rational data types. Calculate sales tax using SSUTA rounding rules. – peterSO Nov 2 at 0:40
  • @peterSO I'll add that to the topics. I believe that is round down for less than 0.5 cents, up for 0.5 cents or greater? How would you implement it? My first idea would be to use the integer types with a scale factor. – Patricia Shanahan Nov 2 at 1:18
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    "I want a solution not an explanation" While that's a reasonable request, IMHO the OP should get an explanation as well as a solution. The current dupe target covers so much ground that it's a bit daunting, so providing smaller focused Q&As should help make the explanation easier to digest. A problem with providing solutions is that it's hard to make them language-agnostic, apart from the really basic stuff. – PM 2Ring Nov 2 at 5:39
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    Don't forget that it is not about the OP, but about future readers of a question (hits from Google search, etc., at least 99.999% of the users of that question). – Peter Mortensen Nov 3 at 16:40
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I'm very much in favor of this.

On the one hand, having canonical questions with curated, high-quality answers to use as duplicate targets for frequently-asked questions is both necessary and awesome. On the other hand, it can easily come across as "RTFM", especially when the master question is dense and non-specific. Closing a programming question as a duplicate of the programming manual is somewhat less than helpful.

The solution to this problem is precisely the one you propose: breaking up the canonicals into more narrowly-scoped questions that each detail with a particular nuance of floating-point arithmetic. This gets us around the "RTFM" problem.

So…go do it!

It's a substantial effort, so don't feel compelled to do them all at once. Pick one question to which you'd like to compose a detailed FAQ-style answer, and then submit it.

It is not necessary to wait until a question is organically asked and convert it into a canonical. You can simply ask-and-answer your own question, in a purpose-built approach. In fact, I would recommend that, because otherwise there's no anchor to quality and nothing to prevent it from getting closed as a duplicate of the uber-general FAQ we have now.

You might want to consider curating a list of these specific canonical questions in the tag wiki. That strategy has worked well for other tags.


Getting down to specifics:

  • Lack of exact representation of short, simple decimal fractions such as 0.1

    Excellent. Explain why binary floating-point is different from decimal floating-point, and why it often conflicts with our decimal-based intuition.

  • Most languages and libraries round floating point numbers on output

    I'm not sure that's a question, and I don't know how you make it sufficiently general, since any good answer is going to be language-specific.

  • When is it useful to switch to decimal or rational arithmetic?

    Also good, but potentially problematic to present it in a form that would be suitable for Stack Overflow: it risks being very opinion-based. As a self-answered canonical, especially one that the community plans to curate, you have a bit more leeway on that front, but you still need to be careful.

  • Floating point addition and multiplication are not associative.

    Excellent. There have been lots of questions about this asked already, particularly focused around "why did the compiler not optimize this?". It would be nice to round those up and dupe them, too—questions like this one.

    In fact, you may not need to create this at all, as we already have some pretty good candidates:

    with the unfortunate caveat that they are mostly GCC- and C-focused. Perhaps you would still want to make the canonical for the general case, and then link to these for more concrete detail?

  • How precise is precise enough? (I see people worrying about a difference of one part in 1015 in physical quantity that cannot possibly be measured that precisely)

  • When is 32 bit float better than 64 bit float? (not often).

    Excellent. However, I suggest that these should actually be the same question. The answer would be a quick summary of why precision matters, including a discussion on catastrophic cancellation, and then a recommendation to always use 64-bit floats because you really need the precision, even if you don't realize that you do. Finally, close with the caveat that there might be cases where you'd want to use a 32-bit float if you were being driven by memory/storage requirements, or on certain microcontrollers where you didn't have hardware 64-bit float support.

  • My programming language only has integer and binary floating point types, no decimal or rational library. How should I implement accounting in dollars and cents with specific rounding rules such as SSUTA?

    If you can craft a sufficiently general answer, I'm on board. But this is something I also see as liable to be highly specific to individual programming languages, since you're talking about implementation, and thus not something that can be easily generalized in a canonical.

  • All good points. Thanks for the input and encouragement. I think the next step is to take one of the topics, work up a Q&A, and see if it can survive without getting killed as a duplicate of "Is floating point math broken?". – Patricia Shanahan Nov 5 at 18:21

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