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As a good indicator of customer feedback, my team looks at stack overflow questions and a number of times, it makes sense for us to answer the question based on the rapid changes in our product line. When we answer though, we would like to understand the customer satisfaction for that answer on a 5 point scale. I wanted to understand if adding a link to a survey at the end of an answer or as a comment on an answer would at all be appropriate? If not, any other suggestions to understand the customer sentiment and feedback better from SO?

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    (1) No, that would not be appropriate, (2) Either use upvotes as a customer satisfaction proxy, or give up on the idea of using SO as your outsourced customer support platform. – Dan Bron Oct 30 at 22:28
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    We definitely arent using SO as our Customer Support plan, we have a separate platform for that. The reality though is that Stack Overflow is awesome! and customers will ask questions here, we just want to participate actively in the community and also understand how satisfied (or not) are our customers :) – Aman Arneja - MSFT Oct 30 at 22:29
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    That’s not what Stack Overflow of for, no. Answers are meant for everyone, not just the person who wrote the question, and the “customer satisfaction rating” will over time be reflected in the answer score. A link to a customer feedback form would not be received well by our community. – Martijn Pieters Oct 30 at 22:30
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    Maybe you could put a survey link on your own site and have the user provide an answer URL in the survey. Seems like that way it wouldn't affect your posts here, but you could still get the more specific feedback you're looking for. – Don't Panic Oct 30 at 22:40
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    Basically, when you engage with other users here, they are not “your customers“. Even if they actually are outside the site. Here you are engaging with other users as part of this community. That you and your team are getting paid to do so is great; but a link to that kind of survey would be completely out of place on this context. – yivi Oct 30 at 22:41
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    Thank you for asking about this first instead of straightaway implementing it. – Davy M Oct 30 at 22:41
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    Thanks i implicitly knew that but did want to gut check .. thanks for the quick responses! .. For what its worth, i give you all 5 stars ;) – Aman Arneja - MSFT Oct 30 at 23:00
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    Not a problem. We all know some times you need to build a paper trail to document to your bosses why their latest brain child isn't a good idea. – Dan Neely Oct 30 at 23:30
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    Lol .. stop reading my mind! – Aman Arneja - MSFT Oct 30 at 23:56
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As a good indicator of customer feedback, my team looks at stack overflow questions…

Be very, very careful that you are not misinterpreting this feedback. There is really only one conclusion that you can reasonably draw from Stack Overflow questions, and that is popularity. The logic being, if nobody asks questions about a product or service, there probably aren't very many people using it. But even that has caveats. There may be alternative explanations for the low incidence of questions: maybe people who use it ask their questions someplace other than Stack Overflow, and/or maybe the product is sufficiently easy to use that there aren't very many questions to be asked about it. Or maybe it is so easy to use and so popular that people are trying to apply it in new, novel ways that it was not intended to be applied in, thus resulting in an abundance of questions. I think the point is adequately made that you need to be very careful in attempting to draw conclusions about the nature of a product or service based on Stack Overflow Q&A.

…a number of times, it makes sense for us to answer the question based on the rapid changes in our product line.

I'm not sure what this means. What you should be doing is answering the question based on the version of the product or service that the asker is using. If it isn't specified, and there are changes in the product line that make the version relevant, then you need to use comments to ask the person to specify.

If there are relevant changes in a newer version of the product or service, then it's always acceptable to mention those as supplemental in your answer.

And, of course, it's highly desirable (though not required) to go back and update your older answers to incorporate supplemental information about newer versions of products/services.

When we answer though, we would like to understand the customer satisfaction for that answer on a 5 point scale.

Why on an arbitrary 5-point scale? Stack Overflow already includes a ranking mechanism for answers—votes! Upvotes mean a satisfied customer; downvotes mean a dissatisfied customer. I recommend using the post score as your metric, instead.

Additionally, you may have people who want to leave more detailed feedback than can be conveyed by a simple vote. Those people can do so by leaving comments. I recommend that you take that form of feedback into account, as well.

Note that post score is only going to be a valid metric of customer satisfaction if your answers are all relevant and of high quality. If your answers don't answer the question, and/or don't comply with our expectations for answers, then you will very likely accumulate downvotes on that basis, and those should not necessarily be taken to mean that the customer is dissatisfied with the product or service that is the subject of the answer. So…write excellent answers. :-)

I wanted to understand if adding a link to a survey at the end of an answer or as a comment on an answer would at all be appropriate?

No, that would not be appropriate, and it would not be welcomed by our community.

(Speaking of…those "customer satisfaction" surveys that Microsoft and other companies put on their technical support websites are also not welcomed by the community. There's no way for us to stop you from doing this, since it's your own website, but it is worth pointing out that nobody actually likes these, and nobody actually believes that their feedback makes any difference. I've been giving feedback to Microsoft through these surveys for years that they need to stop rearranging content on MSDN that breaks links and makes information impossible to find. Have they stopped doing that? No. Alas, the odds of breaking changes and/or information removal seem to have increased. What is the point?)

You could put a link to a survey or some other means of contacting you in your profile (under the "about me" section, where you can enter whatever you wish), but realize that only a vanishingly small number of Stack Overflow users will ever see this, much less decide to actually engage with it.

If not, any other suggestions to understand the customer sentiment and feedback better from SO?

Post score (as measured by upvotes and downvotes) are about the best metric you're going to get here, and they're just a proxy. They can be useful, but only if you carefully apply caveats in your analysis. Comments can be quite useful, too, but you're on your own to develop a way to track this feedback. Using the site's existing tools is going to be the easiest for you, and the least likely to annoy the community here.

  • Thanks for a reasonable answer! On MSDN, recently all feedback is being read and we are taking action. Yesterday we announced a preview of a new platform that will replace MSDN (Microsoft Q&A) and we are putting in stringent controls and processes to review, act and respond on feedback. Hope that makes your future experiences on Microsoft Communities better! :) – Aman Arneja - MSFT Oct 31 at 14:05
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    @Aman Thanks for the update. That sounds like good news, although I certainly hope that when MSDN is migrated to the new platform, yet more content is not lost. Years worth of knowledge base articles have disappeared forever, links to MSDN documentation regularly break, bugs reported on Connect disappear entirely without ever being fixed (apparently Connect has been abandoned, and all of its content has disappeared along with it), years worth of valuable comments on MSDN blogs (like Raymond Chen's) disappear, etc. etc. – Cody Gray Oct 31 at 17:15
  • Absolutely. We are going to keep the data alive and leverage a common search indexing solution for people to find the right data at the time of need! – Aman Arneja - MSFT Oct 31 at 22:07

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