-33

Here's a first-time question-asker at -11, fifteen minutes after he asked the question. He hasn't been back yet to see the comments. I see this sort of thing fairly regularly.

I know as well as anybody that he probably wouldn't improve the question into anything reasonably answerable, even if it weren't closed as a duplicate of "what's a debugger and why do you think I should have been born knowing how to use one". However, he hasn't had the chance to disappoint anybody yet, the odds really aren't improved by this kind of reception. And an awful lot of people here never come back later to reassess their votes.

tl;dr

Has anybody suggested that we block downvoting on first-time questions until the user has been back to engage with requests for improvements? If they're recalcitrant or hopeless then, by all means get out the pitchforks.

IMO, closing questions is not like voting. Coming back to find "your answer can already be found over there", or "we can't answer that" is not like coming back to a pile of downvotes. Personally, I suspect most people are going to interpret downvotes as a contentless internet "f*** you" instead of "this question is of poor quality because...". But I don't have any data to back that up.

Update:

Free t-shirt for the first commenter who can show clear signs of having read and understood what I wrote above. Agree or not, doesn't matter.

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    It is the age-old problem: you only get one chance to make a good first impression. – Cody Gray Oct 28 '19 at 19:16
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    -1, -11, -300, doesn't really matter if the user is at 1 rep. they lose nothing. – Kevin B Oct 28 '19 at 19:23
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    Is the question not a duplicate? Does it not meet the criteria for downvoting? If it wasn't a new user, would it be downvoted? – fbueckert Oct 28 '19 at 19:24
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    "No time to disappoint"... I mean... the question is a screenshot with "I got this problem".... That's already, in my mind, a bit disappointing... – Patrice Oct 28 '19 at 19:29
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    The question deserved downvotes regardless of whether or not it was a duplicate. It consists of an image, and a sentence that says nothing meaningful in terms of what is wrong or what they have. – Kevin B Oct 28 '19 at 19:30
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    My answer here more or less answers this just as well. Essentially, the downvotes being perceived as hostile is the problem, not the downvotes themselves. Fix the perception, fix the problem. People not agreeing with you doesn't mean they don't understand your statement. Just that they don't agree with the premise. – fbueckert Oct 28 '19 at 19:31
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    I kind of agree, except in this case it's an nth-dupe. Perhaps questions closed as duplicates should be capped at (negative) scores equal to the # of questions closed as dupes of the target. In this case, that'd be a floor of -4770. Questions closed as other reasons might do well to have them capped at something more reasonable like -5 (low enough to send a clear signal, and also low enough to require at least two or three users to put it back on the front page w/ upvotes [to circumvent voting rings]). – TylerH Oct 28 '19 at 19:32
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    @fbueckert No t-shirt yet. "So when we surround them yelling 'f*** you', just tell them they're perceiving it the wrong way". That's not the way vertebrates communicate with each other. Oh, I know, I know: They should communicate that way. And maybe yelling 'f*** you' is the key to teaching them! But really, it's a bit late in the development of vertebrates to revise that feature. – Ed Plunkett Oct 28 '19 at 19:49
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    Ed, I am laughing out loud after reading your last comment. Having cleaned up several especially obstinate comment chains that you were involved in. You’re right about how humans perceive things, but missing the more fundamental point. The purpose of this site is not to make people feel good, or to serve as a help desk. Votes are content-rating mechanisms, and the perception or presence of the asker has approximately nothing to do with that. It is indeed unfortunate when someone blows their chance, but it is correctable. – Cody Gray Oct 28 '19 at 20:01
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    Downvoting is key to deletion. The automatic mechanisms use votes as a signal, and even trusted community members cannot vote to delete positively-scored content. Additionally, votes keep the crap off of people’s homepages. There are some very real benefits to the monkey dance, aside from perception. Are you aware that we recently ran an A/B test where the vote scores were fuzzed out (capped)? A detailed analysis of results isn’t in yet, but that may address your primary concern of perception without preventing the votes themselves. – Cody Gray Oct 28 '19 at 20:15
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    There's also one thing here, the more I think about it: with your system, the first downvoter HAS to explain why they want to downvote. Cause they need to send that for the new user to see it and then not answer. so it's a 'explain your downvote' but on steroids.... In any case though I do agree there is a massive dichotomy between how DVs are used and perceived. I feel like whoever manages to fix that without hurting SO's quality would be... Highly praised – Patrice Oct 28 '19 at 20:21
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    Oh for ...... it's an NPE:(( – Martin James Oct 28 '19 at 20:37
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    Why make special pleadings,for users, new or not, who think that grunt work, e.g.. searching for existing answers, checking the FAQ etc is someone else's job? – Martin James Oct 28 '19 at 20:42
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    Why is it so difficult for so many to understand that questions can be, and often are, rude and abusive, in themselves, before a,single,downvote is cast or comment posted? – Martin James Oct 28 '19 at 21:01
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    @MartinJames - Perhaps because that is wrong? That in fact it is not that case, and it is abusive to go around assuming the worst? That the assumption all content is crap because it is not properly communicated is an extreme minority which feels the necessity to vocally comment everywhere? Just some considerations. Questions can be those things, but terming that as "often" would imply a majority of them are. – Travis J Oct 28 '19 at 21:54
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Here's a first-time question-asker at -11, fifteen minutes after he asked the question.

Okay. And? A question is a question is a question. Who asked it is basically irrelevant to the judgement of it's quality.

I know as well as anybody that he probably wouldn't improve the question into anything reasonably answerable, even if it weren't closed as a duplicate of "what's a debugger and why do you think I should have been born knowing how to use one".

True. But...votes don't occur on what might happen. Votes are on what the post is right now. Chances are just as good that someone posting that exact question would have gotten just as many downvotes. And with good reason.

However, he hasn't had the chance to disappoint anybody yet, the odds really aren't improved by this kind of reception.

It's not about giving someone the chance to disappoint anyone. It's about judging the post as it currently is. Not who posted it. Not what it might become.

And an awful lot of people here never come back later to reassess their votes.

That's also true. Pretty much by design; the thinking is that the long tail will eventually result in the post hitting it's true level of quality. There's just too many posts to have time to go back to older ones and reassess. It's unreasonable to expect voters to have to revisit the posts they've already seen. It'd be nice, and some do, but it's as expected as downvoting in the first place; that is, all at the volunteer's behest.

Has anybody suggested that we block downvoting on first-time questions until the user has been back to engage with requests for improvements? If they're recalcitrant or hopeless then, by all means get out the pitchforks.

Yes. Ad nauseum. It never works. We vote on post quality, not who posted it. All it does is delay the inevitable, when users are introduced to, "real SO", only now it's a massive whiplash, as their first post was just fine. No downvotes, after all.

MO, closing questions is not like voting. Coming back to find "your answer can already be found over there", or "we can't answer that" is not like coming back to a pile of downvotes. Personally, I suspect most people are going to interpret downvotes as a contentless internet "f*** you" instead of "this question is of poor quality because...". But I don't have any data to back that up.

Yeah...it is the perception. I get it. You get it. We all get it. The system sucks at explaining it. And it should do better. But that's the thing; the system has to do that. The way it's designed right now, it's meant to be a cold, unemotional judgement. And I want it to stay that way, to be honest. But I can see how converting that judgement into something the poster can translate as less (or not at all) hostile would be beneficial. How to do that, I don't know, but I challenge the assertion that we are required to invest more effort into a post than the poster themselves.

I think that's actually more hostile than any number of downvotes.

From your comment:

"So when we surround them yelling 'f*** you', just tell them they're perceiving it the wrong way".

That's not what I perceive. There's orders of magnitude more new users than curators. I see them as janitors, or floodworkers, desperately trying to stem the tide of junk. It's been a losing battle for years; until the system changes, it's going to continue being one. It's not an, "us vs. them" dichotomy; it's one about the struggle between quality and...not. Users can contribute both, and we'd really like it if everyone contributed quality posts.

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    ...and the curators are widely regarded as lower than garbage-shovellers:( – Martin James Oct 28 '19 at 20:45
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FWIW in the tags where I spend my time (VBA/MS Office-related, for the most part) we tend to make sure that an inadequate question gets at least one DV, usually not more unless it's truly bad.

This has not been discussed among us regulars that I'm aware of, just a habit we've fallen into. On my part (and possibly on the part of others, but I don't know) due to discussions here on Meta.

Since these tags (with the exception of excel) are relatively low-traffic, that -1 is important. It alerts the rest of us to check that question even in a tag where we're not expert nor likely to answer, but have enough knowledge to guide users to improve their question. If the user has followed up on a suggestion, we can UV. If they haven't, we tend to VTC but not pile on with DV. And there are more often than not comments to explain what's required to improve the question.

Not sure how much good it does, quantitatively. But a certain percentage of users do follow up and do improve. And generally the tone of the discussion with the OPs is not agressive or "hateful". And when we do manage to get things sorted and provide an answer (even if it turns out to be a typo/no repro) the OP leaves very happy. So, on the whole, a positive experience.

But totally blocking DV: NO, totally against it. It would make it very difficult in our low-traffic tags to weed out the useless questions. Show only -1 to -3? I could live with that.

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    It is one thing for community members to follow some sort of informal contract where they deem a single downvote as “good enough”, but I have real concerns about systematically preventing anyone from expressing their opinion about the quality of a post through the voting system. Why should my opinion that a question is “unclear or not useful” be suppressed just because someone else had that same opinion and expressed it first? Furthermore, sympathy upvotes are real, and some users will +1 anything. So, unless we also cap upvotes, capping downvotes (even at -3) would lead to serious vote skew. – Cody Gray Oct 28 '19 at 20:22
  • @codygray That's fine. If we were voting to cap yes/no my vote would be a resounding NO. Especially if there are sympathy UV - where I "live" I don't see that so much. Perhaps a high number of DV triggers more UV? Or perhaps it's the culture of different tags / programming languages? That would be an interesting study... FWIW Office devs tend to exist in a much closer relationship to non-devs than other programming languages. I'm certain that skews how we relate to these things :-) – Cindy Meister Oct 28 '19 at 20:26
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    Be sure to look at the editing history. This user invited a lot of communities to their question. Add the crappy problem of caching, and the company's instance in not fixing their "Ask question" page, to understand how many users had a good reason to vote. – Hans Passant Oct 28 '19 at 23:56

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