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Last year I wrote this answer to a question about Read the Docs:
https://stackoverflow.com/a/52131151/2485966

The answer ends with a note about self-hosting. I never bothered to provide a detailed explanation; I assumed a link to this related question would be sufficient:
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/52130181/how-to-download-the-docs-as-pdf

Unfortunately, that question has been "removed from Stack Overflow for reasons of moderation." Today somebody made me aware of this, and at the same time asked a question about my note that I was hoping to find an answer for under the deleted question.

(In case you are wondering: no, I don't remember the reasoning I followed when writing that particular part of my answer in 2018. If I would have that kind of a long-term memory, then I probably wouldn't feel the need to be an active member of SO.)

According to this, users with 10k reputation can view deleted posts. Anybody willing to help me out?

Note: yes, I tried the wayback machine (archive.org), but found no history for this question.

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    The linked question got "roomba'd" due to inactivity (no comments/answers after a certain period of time). So, not a real mod decision. What do you need from that question? – Tom Oct 2 at 18:39
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    The question was automatically deleted because it didn't have an answer. I'm not sure what value/information you wanted add with that link. – BDL Oct 2 at 18:40
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    @BDL It looks like the relevant part is in the comments where someone points out that PDF generation isn't possible because of something they changed when hosting it themselves. OP, I think it's fine for you to just say that this happens. You don't need to prove it with a link. – BSMP Oct 2 at 18:45
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Here's a screenshot of the deleted question. The question was automatically deleted because it didn't get upvotes and answers in a certain period of time. Imho, the question didn't provide any value that can be used anyway.

enter image description here

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