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The Code of Conduct says:

No subtle put-downs or unfriendly language. Even if you don’t intend it, this can have a negative impact on others.

I came across this comment and flagged it as "unfriendly or unkind" but the flag got declined:

Welcome to SO! Did you bother to search the internet or SO questions, first? If so, please share why that does not answer your question.

It's a fair comment but I can't help thinking it's also a subtle put-down. I personally wouldn't be offended at all but other people may take it the wrong way.

I'm not appealing against the moderator decision but I'd like to understand whether other people would have raised a flag in a similar situation and/or whether I was justified in raising a flag in the first place.

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    I would be offended by that FWIW. The user could have easily chosen a more friendly and compassionate way to express that, but now I'm upset for the rest of the day – vaultah Sep 16 at 16:16
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    "Did you bother to" Yeah, much as many of us on SO are used to speaking in that sort of tone, myself included, I think it's time to admit that that is a put-down. In most English-speaking countries, using the phrase "bother to X" often implies laziness or lack of effort/care on part of the subject. What makes this especially subtle is the "Welcome to SO!" at the start. It sends the false impression that the commenter is being friendly... and then the second sentence takes the sincerity out of it completely. – BoltClock Sep 16 at 16:16
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    Yea, remove "bother to" and the tone of that message changes completely. – Cerbrus Sep 16 at 16:23
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    @BoltClock that would make a good answer – Yvette Colomb Sep 16 at 16:31
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    @Yvette Colomb: It didn't feel complete enough to make an answer, and I didn't handle the flag, but I posted it anyway and added a conclusion. – BoltClock Sep 16 at 17:13
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    If there's any chance someone could argue it isn't unkind or even if it is rude but also contains something useful or fair, it's safer to flag it as "No longer needed". It might be good to also leave a polite version of the comment if one doesn't already exist. – BSMP Sep 16 at 17:25
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    <snarky> lol, how about "Did you know you can Google that question first and not add to the millions of questions already posted here on SO?" </snarky> – sfors Sep 17 at 13:32
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I declined the flag. I was on the fence about that one. "Did you bother" was certainly aggressive but the comment starts by

Welcome to SO!

And ends by:

If so, please share why that does not answer your question

2 nice parts, and a (maybe) slightly snarky remark in the middle. I can't mark it as "helpful", delete or edit it (to remove "bother to") without having that counting against the commenter. But after all we get to decide if the commenter has been rude lately, so I could have edited "bother to" out.

Now reading the comment again, it could be seen as friendly as a whole with a slight touch of snark, or hypocritically wrapped condescending comment...

Bummer for this time. We should stop worrying about if flags count against the user and edit the snark out. This accepts the flag and in the end, moderators get to decide if the "offender" is punished but it's manual.

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    No worries I understand, thanks for your clarification though. Sometimes things are not so quite clear-cut. Since my intention was never to appeal against the moderator decision I feel this is the only answer I can accept. (Even though I do acknowledge everybody else input on this matter; thanks all!) – customcommander Sep 16 at 17:29
  • To my dismay, your decline of the flag aligns with convention already present on the site... – Makoto Sep 16 at 18:21
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    Can we just remove that requirement to do your own research before asking question? Would make commenting so much easier to be nice :) – Alexei Levenkov Sep 16 at 18:28
  • @Makoto I should have edited the flag. – Jean-François Fabre Sep 16 at 19:01
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Did you bother to

Yeah, much as many of us on SO are used to speaking in that sort of tone, myself included, I think it's time to admit that that is a put-down. In most English-speaking countries, using the phrase "bother to X" often implies laziness or lack of effort/care on part of the subject. What makes this especially subtle is the

Welcome to SO!

at the start. It sends the false impression that the commenter is being friendly... and then the second sentence takes the sincerity out of it completely. If anything, this subtlety actually worsens the impact of the "bother to" part.

I didn't handle your flag, but I'd say you were justified in raising it, at least. Good thing declined comment flags don't count against the users who raised them in any meaningful way...

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    I'd just like to add that, in trying to judge on how something was meant that we can't forget we're dealing with a lot of people who's first (or even second) language is not English. People tend to pick up what they hear/read without completely understanding the nuances. I could tell some stories...! – Cindy Meister Sep 16 at 20:04
  • @Cindy Meister: That's an important point. I wonder how we're going to educate them on these nuances and whether doing so is tenable or indeed our responsibility. – BoltClock Sep 17 at 4:25
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    All I mean to express with the comment is to keep this in mind when handling this flag. That mods won't go over board / exagerate the significance when encountering a borderline case such as this when it's flagged as "not friendly/abuse". What JFF said he ought to have done is good IMO - getting all moderators on the same line. And if the user is a repeat offender a message explaining the meaning and why it shouldn't be used. – Cindy Meister Sep 17 at 4:37
  • @Cindy Meister: I agree. – BoltClock Sep 17 at 4:39

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