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This in on Linux. It has been an issue for a long time -- I keep expecting the problem to be resolved, because it is so obvious. Today everestads was consuming 25% and the CPU process another 20%. Both went away by killing the everestads subframe. The ad that was displaying at the time did not seem to have any dynamic content.

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Because they can. Stack Overflow is not going to stop this, so there's no point in asking them to stop.

Use an ad blocker (my favorite is uBlock Origin).

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    Also related: meta.stackexchange.com/q/332974/332043 (especially note the lack of an official answer) – Zoe Sep 10 at 16:25
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    'The ToS says one thing, an employee says a different thing, and a different employee attempts to lie. The three sources combined contradict each other - one says it happens, one says it shouldn't, and one pretends it doesn't happen. We have no idea where the company really stands unless they provide a canonical answer.' - Sums up the whole thing. Seems like it's being ignored, like every other concern. – Script47 Sep 10 at 19:14
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    This is sound advice, but why stop at just one adblocker? Sometimes the sets of what they stop are disjoint. Combine Adblock with f.ex. Privacy Badger or something else. I like PB because I've seen it block resources from CDNs that track you where AdBlock didn't seem to care (presumably because there was no visible ad, just tracking). – ivarni Sep 11 at 3:57
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    @ivarni a normal ad blocker usually blocks the domain, so it should theoretically block all requests. No requests == no JS == no cookies. Personally, I use FF with custom-configured settings for the internal finterprinting, cryptominer, and tracker blocking, as well as uBlock Origin, HTTPSEverywhere, DecentralEyes, and Privacy Badger (and yeah, I also think my system is absolute overkill, but it blocks everything I don't explicitly let through, including the trackers uBlock or FF don't catch). Which ad blocker you use makes a massive difference though - I highly recommend uBlock Origin – Zoe Sep 11 at 15:27
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I can see some constant background activity with the same ad, though not at the described level. But the absolute CPU usage would be expected to vary due to different hardware, and variation in the environment. For me the everestads.net process doesn't go above 10% CPU usage, but that is on a very recent desktop CPU.

I just managed to catch this ad again on a different computer, Chrome on Linux with an AMD Ryzen 2600 CPU, and I get a higher CPU usage here with ~15-20% permanently while the page is open.

I can see that the script does execute at a high rate using requestAnimationFrame. I'm not sure I understand exactly what it's doing; it seems to be mostly just incrementing a timer, and keeping track of the last 100 deltas between calls. I don't understand the purpose of this activity, if there is one.

  • Could this be an extremely inefficient timer being used to see how long you're visiting a page before closing it? – scohe001 Sep 10 at 21:55
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    The goal of the process is to detect a-typical suspicious (fake) environments used to generate fake ad impressions. I can imagine that one marker would be a too-regular timer interval (indicating that the OS is not busy doing anything else, like background tasks, etc). You’d detect that by taking measurements. Lots of them. – Martijn Pieters Sep 11 at 0:12
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    @MartijnPieters I feel that they would fail... there are literal phone farms which their only purpose is to generate touch (?) for the ads. A real device, with a real human, touching the ads. – Braiam Sep 11 at 15:18
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    @Braiam: It's a constant cat and mouse game, apparently. I'm glad I am not in it. – Martijn Pieters Sep 11 at 15:20

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