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I've restarted using the review queue in my profile to help moderate Stack Overflow. When I use the review queue I've found that some of the questions I get are so far out of my topic of knowledge - so all I can do is Skip. Is there a way to map queues to the user?

For example, if most tags I am active on are python and c++ where my knowledge is more pushed for Python (judging by my answer acceptance and votes). But in most of the queues, I get answers for Linux and PHP which are very rare in my search bar (some random search week ago), or from some languages/topics I've never even heard of.

I think it would be beneficial for Stack Overflow if tags of questions could be fitted towards user. This way there is an credibility to the user, and if a user decides to expand their knowledge, tags should naturally reflect that.

For example, if some user has some number of answers with 10+ votes in some tag, Stack Overflow could prioritise that tag for that user and therefore develop a trusted credibility base.

This way it seems too easy for me to mess stuff up by flagging questions I don't know enough about.

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    But shouldn't it be automated and built upon an trusted community ? I've never used angular.js , so the mere possibility i can flag that is frightening. – Danilo Aug 22 at 14:07
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    If a question is flagged as angular.js, but the actual text of the question says "I want to build a website with LEGO and mustard and CSS; were can I find a tutorial thanks advanced!!1!", wouldn't you know what to do with it? My point is: many times you do not need domain knowledge to act on review. – yivi Aug 22 at 14:08
  • True, but the same would follow for person who knows angular. And person who knows that example language, wouldn't have as much trouble figuring out if LEGO is an children toy or Library or another language. – Danilo Aug 22 at 14:11
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    I trust you agree with me that the problems with my hypothetical question go beyond identifying that LEGO and mustard may not really apply to web development. – yivi Aug 22 at 14:12
  • @Danilo The problem with that logic is that it relies on there being people with a high tag score in angular spending time in the CV Queue. Most people do not review things. – TylerH Aug 22 at 14:18
  • Perhaps... honestly in my experience, high rep users often do comment, answer flag and etc. I am willing to bet that they are not polymaths , and that they as we all have their own expertise. Just their expertise ( due to experience ) contains 100 tags, and mine 2. – Danilo Aug 22 at 14:21
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    Take user Mark Adler for example. Among his most used tags are gzip, zlib,crc and deflate wouldn't it be logical to forward him queues containing to compression and decompression, with custom binary files? – Danilo Aug 22 at 14:26
  • @Danilo If Mark Adler did review tasks, then maybe. But we don't require anyone do any specific action on the site. – TylerH Aug 22 at 14:32
  • I honestly don't see you point : 141 posts edited, 5 helpful flags, 534 votes cast. He isn't active in moderating but he still does it. And last revised was on 30th march. – Danilo Aug 22 at 14:35
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    @Danilo, Mark only performed 7 reviews. Nothing more. Which is fine – yivi Aug 22 at 14:35
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    @Danilo You're asking us to shove review queues in Mark's face. He doesn't currently (or really ever) use those, as my link shows. He's never reviewed a question in the close vote queue. Maybe he casts votes organically, but that's not the same thing as sitting there in a queue and reviewing posts. He's also been around for 7 and a half years, and only performed the handful of organic moderation actions you just listed. You want to ask him to start reviewing 40 a day? – TylerH Aug 22 at 14:37
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    I really, honestly don't know from where in this conversation you found the desire to shove or force someone to do anything. You are placing words out of context. But lets then take you two for example: Both have 0 activity on python tag, is this spam ? Is this deserving of an flag or downvote :stackoverflow.com/questions/45011723/… – Danilo Aug 22 at 14:49
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    Same thing for Triage. – yivi Aug 22 at 14:55
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    Danilo, that user simply mixed up the right and left side of the assignment. Nothing else. Despite my tag score, I'm not completely ignorant about Python. – yivi Aug 22 at 14:59
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We already have manual tag filtering:

enter image description here

Which lets you filter what you want. AFAIK, all the queues support this.

This way there is an credibility to the user, and if user decides to expand their knowledge, tags should naturally reflect that.

Well, this results in several challenges:

If you're requiring tag score to review posts on specific tags, what about people who are familiar enough with the techs to review, but not necessarily enough to answer or haven't found an unanswered question to ask? Off the top of my head, take Kotlin. Even before I started learning Kotlin, as a Java user, I could personally review Kotlin easily. The terminology is mostly the same, and the principles as well, but I didn't have any score.

I recently got into C++ (I currently have one post on the C++ tag), but I'm nowhere near the point where I can answer high-quality C++ questions. I still understand most of it now. Before I got into it, I didn't - though that specifically applies to question reviewing. Reviewing duplicates and understanding what the question asked was pretty hard. My tag score on C++ is pretty far from my C++ knowledge. I'll also go as far as say that most people don't have tag scores that represent their knowledge.

Even better example for me personally - Python. Most of my use for Python is general. I could probably answer the low-quality, asked a couple million times already dupes, but I don't have a chance of answering the higher quality questions. If I remember tag score calculation accurately, I should have -1 score on Python. I still know it, and I wouldn't mind reviewing Python questions. The tag score doesn't mean I don't know Python and can't be trusted with reviewing.

I think it would be beneficial of the stack overflow if tags of questions could be fitted towards user. This way there is an credibility to the user, and if user decides to expand their knowledge, tags should naturally reflect that.

You can expand your knowledge without posting a single question or answer on Stack Overflow, and naturally have 0 score. If you go by traffic, people like me (who review NAAs through bots or the 10k tools) would end up with, well, everything and defeat the purpose of this feature request.

Also, what about low-traffic tech? Take Brainfuck for an instance. There's about two questions posted every month. There's probably browsers, but likely far from enough active 3k users to handle closure without help from review (or SOCVR). Small techs would more or less be excluded from the main reviewers (and yeah, there are people who don't filter and review stuff in several fields).

Take user Mark Adler for example. Among his most used tags are gzip, zlib,crc and deflate wouldn't it be logical to forward him queues containing to compression and decompression, with custom binary files? (source)

Take Mark Adler for example - they also have over 200 score on Python, over 400 score on C++, and even 40 on Android. Does that mean you plan on suppressing those because there's other tags that outrank them?

Further, many, if not the majority of review tasks don't require domain-specific knowledge. Reviewing duplicates might, but many are pretty obvious. Regardless of which language a question expects answers in, we can all agree:

Write a program that does X, Y, Z, and M using any libraries at hand. Please provide the code.

is a horrible question. Obvious trash is obvious trash independently of the language.

Further, mistagging happens all the time. Watch the Java and JavaScript tags, and you'll see several questions about JS tagged Java, questions about Java tagged JS, and some questions weirdly tagged with both. You won't affect much - you'll still periodically see questions you can't understand because of technical language with a close vote on "unclear"

But in the end, what's the point? What if I don't want to review questions associated with one of my main tags? What if I want to review <insert some tech here> instead?

Further, very many users don't review at all (which I can't blame them for to be honest). If several users on one tag decide to leave, what then? You stand there with even fewer reviewers on a single tag and the effect on the amount of questions in the review queue on that could skyrocket while the rest is relatively low (depending on traffic obviously).

In the comments, you linked to this question and indirectly asked if it was spam. We have a definition of spam that makes it obvious to find. You're looking for (this is a TL;DR, and not a substitute for the content in the link)

  • Gibberish
  • Promotional links in a pattern that doesn't appear to be good faith (i.e. if the user is warned but continues anyway)
  • Stuff that's universally definable as spam (such as fake tech support, keto diets, sale of various pills, obvious scams or otherwise malicious behavior, etc.)
  • Hate speech (commonly flagged as rude or abusive)
  • ... etc.

You don't flag questions asking for help with code as spam! Unless it falls under the definition of spam, but that's pretty rare and easy to detect. It might be low-quality and worthy of a close vote/flag and a downvote at times, but it's not spam. Imagine if you asked a question, and 6 downvotes later lost 100 rep and saw it was deleted as spam, or rude or abusive, when you were asking about a function in jQuery.

This way it seems too easy for me to mess stuff up by flagging question I don't know enough about.

Then don't flag it. Filter to see the techs you want, skip the rest. No one is forcing you to review either. Remember: If you're in doubt, there's no shame in clicking skip.

  • "Imagine if you asked a question, and 6 downvotes later lost 100 rep and saw it was deleted as spam, or rude or abusive, when you were asking about a function in jQuery." this did happen to me on numerous times, and i am not only one. I got -13 downvotes, got closed and deleted after 2 days. I did however help this decision by being frustrated, angered, and frightened by loss of reputation. I admit that perhaps forced filtering isn't well polished as i hoped. But this stuff happens still. – Danilo Aug 22 at 15:56
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    @Danilo yeah, but that results in -26 rep and a potential asking ban. The -100 rep from spam flags stay even after deletion. Normal deletion sends the signal the post is bad, spam deletion is a signal that's significantly worse ("Your question is so bad it's spam" - we don't have a definition of spam that includes normal questions). Also, spam deletion is very different from regular deletion, because regular deletion doesn't have the same side-effects as spam deletion (spam deletion being deletion by Community with the spam warning). – Zoe Aug 22 at 16:01
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    I still get it though, it's demotivating. It takes a long time to learn how to ask a really good question. I personally avoid asking on SO unless I know I have a unique question that's of decent quality and I can't find anything that answers it online (and that usually takes hours of searching, but that's also a trainable skill). Most reviewers in the CV queue don't downvote, however. It's most likely to happen outside the queue. – Zoe Aug 22 at 16:04
  • i am currently under "another bad question and you will get asking ban" type scenario, because of that question ... and I can't tell you how much rep i lost ( it was more than 26 rep... i was close to 600 before that. And for the stuff to be more funny, i'm at top 11% users in growth, and was a week before that among most trusted users to answer/ask question. I've been from top of the wheel to the threat of the bottom. But mine scenario on the side. The fact that it happens, shows that there needs to be an trusted credibility network. – Danilo Aug 22 at 16:06
  • @Danilo You can validate that by using the reputation audit. According to your graph, you were at just under 500 rep when you received a bunch of downvotes, that you regained shortly after (probably due to deletion). You don't miss the rep loss from spam though, -100 is pretty noticeable unless you go inactive and happen to get enough other events to drown it out. However, if an answer of yours was incorrectly deleted as spam, raise a mod flag. Note that it needs to say it was deleted by Community, as well as have the spam warning to count. – Zoe Aug 22 at 16:10
  • Unhandled spam flags on a post when it's deleted is marked as helpful and it says the post content is hidden, but unless it's deleted by Community, it doesn't follow with the penalties. – Zoe Aug 22 at 16:11
  • Zoe thank you for that information. I can't see the downvotes i am mentioning in my graph. The question was deleted as "to broad" or something ( i have suppressed it ... i can't remember ) . I can't find it , i can't link to it. But it really doesn't matter. My scenario isn't the focus of the question, and i wish not to burden you with the story. – Danilo Aug 22 at 16:15
  • I just think that some way to limit misuse is necessary. My question is driven by my own fear of not turning into a monster. – Danilo Aug 22 at 16:16

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