-29

I am not good with English but this seems to me as a person trying to thrash the other but with cherry on top (to avoid flags?)

Sorry, I don't mean to be rude, but IMHO this hardly "gets rid of the inessentials", and does not answer the question. What the OP posted is standard code, with the first being the pyuic output and the second the normal usage of that approach, as suggested by official documentation too. If you want to post simpler and shorter code that's fine, just ensure that it actually is simpler and shorter (your code can be written with half the lines, improving readability in the meantime); also, you should really avoid using capitalization for variables names, including instancies.

Source

Explanation of why I think this is rude:

but IMHO this hardly "gets rid of the inessentials"

  • Escalating IMO by adding humble
  • Unnecessary quoting to point something?

If you want to post simpler and shorter code that's fine, just ensure that it actually is simpler and shorter (your code can be written with half the lines, improving readability in the meantime)

  • I don't think the guy who posted answer have to "ensure".
  • It seems like this guy is saying "you should know what actually means simpler and shorter".

your code can be written with half the lines, improving readability in the meantime

  • The other guy says the code can be written in half the lines. But in later comments doesn't reveal so.
  • Improving readability in meantime - what does this mean? seems a bit not good.

What do you guys think?

I am not against any of them here. Just want to interpret english better. cherry at bottom :)

  • Honestly, I would have just ignored such comments on me but posting here because someone felt bad about it. And I have time. – Mr_Green Aug 15 at 18:24
  • 2
    IMHO can also refer to "In My Honest Opinion" - wouldn't exactly call it a disclaimer, but rather an explicit way of saying it's their opinion. If you mean the extra H is "with [a] cherry on top (to avoid flags?)", that's hardly grounds to avoid flags when it has two meanings. Or, to make another extreme comparison, a targeted personal insult wouldn't be any less rude if there was a "thanks" at the end. – Zoe Aug 15 at 18:28
  • I meant this as cherry on top - "Sorry, I don't mean to be rude" – Mr_Green Aug 15 at 18:29
  • 9
    Style and interpretation varies. What may sound rude to you is the same as trying to be polite in different cultures. Try to avoid reading too much into any subtext. The things pointed out seem fair, and there's no blatant rudeness, so I don't think this comment is inappropriate. It doesn't seem to be trashing, but valid criticism. If anything, the following comments seem rude to me. – Erik A Aug 15 at 18:38
  • 1
    That whole comment thread needs a mod flag. No need to cherry pick one comment and have an endless debate on that one. – rene Aug 15 at 18:42
  • 2
    @rene No mod flag needed. The mods are already all over it: chat.stackoverflow.com/transcript/197999 – Mysticial Aug 15 at 18:44
  • 8
    @rene It has been flagged and reviewed and the matter is closed, as far as the moderators at the parties involved are concerned. I really don't see the value in examining this particular comment (or really, any of the comments here) under a microscope on meta, but here we are. – meagar Aug 15 at 18:45
  • 3
    I'm speechless and that doesn't happen often ... – rene Aug 15 at 18:55
  • 11
    @rene your comment made me wanna read it and.... 3 mods for THIS?!... Wow ... If we're succinct were rude. If we post more words...were rude. Is there any way to not be rude, besides silence? – Patrice Aug 15 at 22:44
  • 2
    @Patrice yes, there is. You must answer the question immediately and correctly, no matter how unclear, incomplete or inappropriate the question. Asking for clarifications is just setting yourself up as a target, on meta if you're lucky, on Facepalm/Tutter if you are not:( – Martin James Aug 16 at 8:27
  • 2
    OMG I already have to talk more carefully on SO nowadays than talking to my 16 months old daughter (I personally consider myself a very responsible father), and afaik this site is actually R13. How far do we have to go on this? – tweray Aug 16 at 13:17
  • @MartinJames I don't agree: immediate no-matter-what answers/comments are not good. While some people is skilled enough to do it in a "good" way (meaning, in this case, being sure that the answer/comment is not misunderstood as "bullying"), not everybody can do that; and that's a good thing: most people can provide better answers, even if that requires more time. And lots of people prefer a better answer (as long as you give'em enough time) opposed to a fast and unclear/incomplete/inappropriate one. And if you're setting yourself up as a target for that, that shouldn't really be a problem. – musicamante Aug 17 at 4:47
  • 1
    @musicamante AFAIK, Martin James has a habit of using :( instead of /s (yes, his comment is a sarcasm) – Andrew T. Aug 17 at 14:30
  • @AndrewT. damn, I was too tired to get that. Thanks. – musicamante Aug 17 at 16:18
25

I can't see this as an attempt to thrash, even reading it in the worst light. It looks like the user has a valid criticism of the answer, and is trying to use extra words to express it in the least offensive way possible, because we get told that succinctness is rude or unwelcoming.

Obviously, a polite qualifier doesn't excuse someone from actually being rude, but I think this person wrote a not-rude comment, looked back, thought it could be blunt, and wanted to make sure it wasn't taken that way.

Escalating IMO by adding humble

There's nothing offensive about IMO or IMHO, regardless of if the H means Honest or Humble. You're not trying to put yourself above the other person by pointing out that your opinion is humble or honest, you're just underlining the fact that it's you talking for yourself and not talking as a representative of others or their opinions.

Tim's post goes into more detail about how IMO/IMHO and other qualifiers could be an indicator that what follows lacks compassion or is brutal or otherwise inappropriate. I agree with that anaysis, but it's not the fault of the IMO or IMHO, that's the fault of the following text. Hence why I say there's nothing offensive about the acronyms themselves.

Unnecessary quoting to point something?

The person was quoting word for word a portion of the OP's text, that's what quotes are for. Without the quote, it wouldn't have been clear exactly what part of the post the commenter was referring to, so it was necessary.

I don't think the guy who posted answer have to "ensure".

It seems like this guy is saying "you should know what actually means simpler and shorter".

Here, the commenter is referring to the posts' claim that their code is getting "rid of the inessentials," which is synonymous to saying getting rid of the things that don't matter. That's simplifying and shortening, so the commenter is just expressing their understanding of the intent of the poster in their own words to make sure both parties understand what is going on. Doing this is a tactic of a good listener, so that's the opposite of being rude.

The other guy says the code can be written in half the lines. But in later comments doesn't reveal so.

The person has made an observation of an improvement they can see with a post. That's not rude, however it might not be as helpful as it could be for the reason you describe. It's one thing to tell someone they have a problem, and it's another to tell them how to fix it. It would have been nice of them to explain exactly what lines they could cut, but it's not rude to tell someone that they have room for improvement. Telling them how is just a bonus.

Improving readability in meantime - what does this mean? seems a bit not good.

Simpler things are easier to read. If it were shorter (yet still clear), the post would be easier to read. That doesn't mean it is currently hard to read, and it certainly isn't an insult towards the post. It's just providing justification for why it would be good to implement their suggestion of their comment.

  • I agree with you except last para where you said "It's just providing justification" - he never provided justification. Right? – Mr_Green Aug 15 at 18:52
  • 6
    @Mr_Green "Improving readability" is the justification. If I just say "do x," then that gives you no reason to do x, but if I say "do x because it will improve y," I have justified the reason for doing x. – Davy M Aug 15 at 19:00
  • 6
    [comment author here: I don't know if it's bad practice to intervene here when you're the case in point, I hope it's not] I think you got exactly what I meant. I've been around SO a bit, and read about the succinctness issue, which is also something I usually do even in real life. Unfortunately not everybody gets that, and when somebody feels attacked by criticism they tend to react exactly in the opposite way (I've got a fair number of punches for this, but that doesn't stop me from keeping to try and be polite anyway). – musicamante Aug 15 at 19:37
  • 4
    I didn't post my code because I thought it wouldn't have been useful to the question or the answer, and he was already commenting too much. After my switching to chat he said I switched to see him "stay quiet so that [I] could get in the last lame word", and he wouldn't stand by "same lame duck who probably could not out program me their best day"; annoyed, I gave him my code; even after that he claimed I didn't provide proof (as it wasn't exactly "half"). Here are both examples, as the answer has been deleted; his comes first: gist.github.com/MaurizioB/e9c671dda90997e8f62e52b0e11755fd – musicamante Aug 15 at 20:04
16

I hate English. And I speak it fluently.

I also hate feeling like I've been snake bit. And I can see that evident (to a degree) in the commentator's remarks.

Your comment here neatly sums up why, emphasis mine:

Honestly, I would have just ignored such comments on me but posting here because someone felt bad about it.

The problem isn't that what was said was actually rude. It was interpreted as rude. That's enough these days to launch an Inquisition® into whether or not someone was being offensive to another person.

I'll respond to your points in turn.

but IMHO this hardly "gets rid of the inessentials"

  • Escalating IMO by adding humble
  • Unnecessary quoting to point something?

In context, a quote like that refers directly to something which was said prior. The specific line was likely called out since there was no explanation to what the "inessentials" were.

This works (pyqt5 / python 3.7) in Windows10 and gets rid of the inessentials

Everyone who commentates is entitled to an opinion, so IMO/IMHO is little more than noise.

If you want to post simpler and shorter code that's fine, just ensure that it actually is simpler and shorter (your code can be written with half the lines, improving readability in the meantime)

  • I don't think the guy who posted answer have to "ensure".
  • It seems like this guy is saying "you should know what actually means simpler and shorter".

The OP made the claim...

...but this is simpler and more straight forward...

...and it should be a defensible claim by anyone who reads Python. I happen to read Python and I'm not really disagreeing with the notion that the OP's code is neither simpler nor shorter than what the asker had provided.

You're taking offensive at a statement here which the OP failed to defend of their own volition.

your code can be written with half the lines, improving readability in the meantime

  • The other guy says the code can be written in half the lines. But in later comments doesn't reveal so.
  • Improving readability in meantime - what does this mean? seems a bit not good.

Improving readability of code is always good.

Copy editors can't really touch this since it might wind up turning into a refactoring, and the OP in this context should be the one to do that.

I don't necessarily disagree with the "half the lines" statement there; if the commentator believes they could do so, they should leave an answer. But that's not an offensive or aggressive remark unto itself.

-9

I'm going to answer generally, as if you were a third-party to it, because I think that's the most useful thing to do. I don't want to critique different ends of a conversation in a peanut gallery, so I'm not really depending on the link you provided.

Any time you say "Not to be [thing], but [words that you feel need a disclaimer]" you probably want to re-evaluate what you want to communicate and find a better way.

Some shining examples of when folks really need to think a bit more:

  • Not to be [racist/sexist/homophobic] but, (racist, sexist, or homophobic statement)
  • IMHO (not so humble assertion, honesty lacking compassion is often brutal)
  • I'm not telling you what to do, but (proceeds to tell someone what to do)

So yes, inordinately specific qualifiers should generally be re-thought and ideally re-worded because when you engage in a way where you wish to influence someone, you should always think of how it might escalate if your attempt fails. So if you start off with needing a disclaimer or qualifier, going up from there probably entails being downright rude, even if the first attempt did a good enough job of couching it.

The way to say that more effectively is "This doesn't do what you think it does, and here's why.."

Conversely ....

In the example you gave, It looks like the person read the comment they were posting and realized it might be interpreted in a manner they didn't want -- and that they cared how the other person felt. I pick up on that because I've contacted many people about comments like that and most of the time, their intentions and emotions were completely benign.

Learning how to recognize when we need to turn a brain dump of what we think into text that resonates as efficiently with the world as possible is called learning how to communicate more effectively and everyone goes through it.

What you could do is just simply say "I think what [so and so] meant to convey was [actionable, constructive thing] which took me a few reads to realize" if you find yourself as a third party to an interaction that went poorly and you can help, just take care to disengage from any hostility if it breaks out and involve a moderator immediately. This is a non-confrontational way of helping people learn how their phrasing was actually interpreted (and that folks had a hard time parsing it), and helps the person it was directed at realize that the tone was quite off.

  • 10
    Imo imho shouldn't be in that list. It's used interchangeably with imo, to indicate something is an opinion rather than a hard fact. Something entirely different than not to be <something>, but. You may hammer on that h that some people read as humble, others as honest, and others just skip over (apparently it's about 50-50 in some random buzzfeed poll in slight favor of honest), but I think neither generally lead to rudeness more than sharing an opinion without introduction. – Erik A Aug 15 at 19:01
  • 9
    [comment author here] As pointed out in another answer, the whole introduction was exactly to avoid the "succinctness is rude/unwelcoming". I'm aware that trying to be "too" kind might seem indulgent/patronizing, but I honestly prefer risking the latter than being just blunt and succinct. Also, I don't think "Not to be/but" are the same here. I said I wasn't meaning to be rude (I knew my comment could, as most critics can). You can't put that on the same plane of being homofobic/racist/etc. It's just politeness. Eg: "Sorry to interrupt, but I've to leave" is not the same as "I'm leaving". – musicamante Aug 15 at 19:25
  • 2
    I just had a nice Princess Bride moment. – Robert Harvey Aug 15 at 19:43
  • 1
    @musicamante IMO, the first half of Tim's answer is good general advice. It might be -- as is the case with your comment -- that there is nothing rude in what follows the "don't mean to be rude" disclaimer. That being so, though, the disclaimer is superfluous, and unlikely to dissuade someone inclined to take offence. – duplode Aug 15 at 20:13
  • @duplode I agree, as unfortunately there's that much you can do when you deal with very sensitive people (and that's seems to be the case). Maybe, if we met in person, it could have been gone very differently (possibly in a good way), but, then again, I've had my share of situations in which you just can't do nothing to change how people sees your manners once they've got their impression, no matter what you try to do. – musicamante Aug 15 at 20:24

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .