-27

The tag is very unclear and ambiguous, and more specific tags already exist for all or nearly all of its questions. Let's put it on the list of things to get rid of and retag. Questions with the tag should be retagged either with , , or an appropriate tag for the type of list being used.

Does it describe the contents of the questions to which it is applied? and is it unambiguous?

No, the tag wiki itself states:

The list tag may refer to: a linked list (an ordered set of nodes, each referencing its successor), or a form of dynamic array. Not to be used for HTML lists, use [html-lists] instead.

Is the concept described even on-topic for the site?

No, only specific types of lists as used in programming are on-topic.

Does the tag add any meaningful information to the post?

Not really.

  • Questions about HTML lists can use the existing tag, as mentioned in the tag wiki.
  • Questions about arraylists can be retagged with the existing tag instead of this one.
  • Questions about linked lists can be retagged with the existing tag.
  • For times when a single link direction is just not good enough, we already have the tag.

Does it mean the same thing in all common contexts?

No, questions could be about any specific type of list mentioned above, and it can refer to questions both about the data structures themselves, implementation details in various frameworks, or applied usage questions. It's not clear how anyone could be a general expert in technology.

21

There's several strikes against this

Is the concept described even on-topic for the site?

The answer here is a definitive YES. Lists are a thing in Python and nearly half of the tag is for Python. That's not even counting C#, Java, .NET, etc.

90k questions would also be the largest burninate ever done. There's no way to retag or clean it up, so the only remaining option would be CM removal.

This is a basic programming data structure tag. It should not be burninated.

  • 3
    Side note: a lot of people call python lists arrays because they don't know better, so we should probably have even more [list]-tagged questions than we already do. – Andras Deak Aug 14 at 16:04
  • The Python-centric objection also applies to Haskell, as well as to the various Lisps. – duplode Aug 14 at 16:48
  • Yes, Wikipedia even [list]s it as an example of an Abstract Data Type. – EJoshuaS - Reinstate Monica Aug 14 at 21:33
11

I disagree with the burnination. There are a few issues here, and the fact that there are 90k posts in that tag seems to be the least of the issues.

Does it describe the contents of the questions to which it is applied?

Yes, it definitely does. It is a question about a "list". Tags can't get any more specific than this. List is a perfectly valid term in programming languages. It is a valid datastructure.

There would have been an issue if someone were to create a new language called "list", or a new Operating System called "list", which has a completely different meaning.

The fact that the tag wiki is written as such is a good reason to update the tag wiki and make it clear that list is about the datastructure.

No, only specific types of lists as used in programming are on-topic.

This can be used as a generic answer to literally any tag. When talking about tags on Stack Overflow, we need to consider the programming related aspect of the tags only. In the worst case, if we get a question about a person asking how to manage their grocery list, then we should just close that one question and not kill an entire tag.

Questions about arraylists can be retagged with the existing tag instead of this one.

ArrayList is a specific implementation of a list datastructure in Java, and not the concept itself.

it can refer to questions both about the data structures themselves, implementation details in various frameworks, or applied usage questions

This is the case with any programming language tag, as well. As long as all the questions are about the same single meaning of , then we need not worry.

5

I can see why you might argue that this is ambiguous, I think that it's still on-topic and adds information to the post. Even if it could refer to several different specific data structures, it's still a general category of data structures. In fact, Wikipedia gives list as an example of an abstract data type.

There are also high-rep users who have answered quite a few questions with this tag. We'd have to hear from them directly to know for sure, but this at least suggests that it might be helping people find stuff to answer (in which case burninating it would likely be a mistake).

I don't think that this really meets the criteria for burnination.

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