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True experts can be harsh and direct but often for valid reasons. Edsger Dijkstra is a classic example of such character in Programming and Computer Science. Generic Stack Exchange could be a better place for the discussion, but since I point to a CS figure let it be here.

He was known for the direct and somewhat cynical style but also for his achievements. Dijkstra left rich legacy of over 1300 papers, would it be written if he was forced into writing in be-nice style? I doubt so. By the way, is it allowed to post his quotes under the Code of Conduct at all? :)

This direct style is rather natural to people with certain cultural backgrounds e.g. it is very common for people from ex-USSR countries (myself included). We find it natural and don't think that it hinders constructive discussion unless it gets personal or deteriorates to 'trolling'.

In a nutshell, I think 'be nice' policy if it's overly moderated can harm psychological safety i.e. ability to freely share concerns and suggest bold ideas without fear of repercussions/downvoting/banning etc.

Psychological Safety does not equal to 'be nice', it's a balance between 'be nice' and 'be honest' and not necessarily in favor of the former, sometimes inconvenient truth needs to be spoken in harsh and direct manner. Yet this is the most important factor in successful teams according to empirical data from Google's Project Aristotle.


To clarify what I am asking for:

I would explicitly whitelist appropriate/recommended phrases to express grades of criticism or disagreement (up to extreme) in the Code of Conduct. "I extremely disagree with this answer" and similar.

I know it is mechanical, but at least for people like me it would be straightforward to follow and not offend anyone, and since it's such a sensitive topic it could be a good compromise.

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  • And what do you propose we do about it? We have had endless discussions over where we stand on this, it's not clear what you are bringing that is new. If you have a new idea for a policy change and/or a technological enhancement (e.g. a better Ask Question Wizard), please share it, and explain why it is likely to help! Aug 14, 2019 at 15:06
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    There's a difference between "writing papers" and direct communication. While honesty is indeed important, is it mutually exclusive with respect?
    – Lewis
    Aug 14, 2019 at 15:06
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    You can share your ideas. Thing is, though, that being direct can be seen as rude (I know, I'm usually pretty direct), and that detracts from the message you're trying to convey; people will focus on the bluntness, and at that point, whatever you're trying to say becomes ineffective. What you say is important, but how you say it also matters a great deal.
    – fbueckert
    Aug 14, 2019 at 15:07
  • @RobertColumbia what do you propose we do about it - mark the question as duplicate if it was already asked. I didn't find one with words "Dijkstra" or "Psychological Safety" or I would have asked. And stop downvoting people based on their cultural traits unless they attacked you - yet this is exactly the treatment that I'm getting right now.
    – KolA
    Aug 14, 2019 at 15:10
  • @RobertColumbia I was referring to wider audience. You can include this suggestion in your Code of Conduct.
    – KolA
    Aug 14, 2019 at 15:11
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    Downvoting != violation of Code of Conduct. It's a common correlation, and always misguided. Downvotes are curation; on Meta, it's used as agree/disagree, for the most part. The premise here seems to be that tone should be ignored entirely in favor of content, no matter how rude it can be seen as. Even with how blunt I am most of the time, I have to disagree with that.
    – fbueckert
    Aug 14, 2019 at 15:11
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    @KoIA - How do you know that you were downvoted based on your "cultural traits"? Evereybody has to be treated the same, and this includes downvotes. I personally downvoted this question because it seems to be more of a collection of "facts" than "ideas" or "suggestions".
    – Lewis
    Aug 14, 2019 at 15:12
  • and to clarify - being or not being nice at all costs is the cultural trait, it's not just diversity traits etc.
    – KolA
    Aug 14, 2019 at 15:12
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    Honestly, your post feels like one of those feel-good "diversity" seminars that are great for whipping people up into an emotional frenzy but not very good at all for implementing lasting change. Aug 14, 2019 at 15:13
  • @RobertColumbia how is your last comment any different in that respect? That was not my intention at all.
    – KolA
    Aug 14, 2019 at 15:15
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    Because Robert's comment doesn't do the thing that Robert's comment says your post did
    – Clive
    Aug 14, 2019 at 15:15
  • When I type "you" in this context it can refer to a group of people or to one person and I apologize for ambiguity (it's English), in the opposite direction it always "me", so I'm not the one who is making it personal
    – KolA
    Aug 14, 2019 at 15:18
  • I'm sure "we" can all agree that when "we" say "you", "we" are referring to people other than "you" who also happen to share the same opinion. Thereby making it as impersonal as your own intentions, and re-levelling the playing field.
    – Clive
    Aug 14, 2019 at 15:24
  • @Clive "Honestly, your post feels like one of those feel-good "diversity" seminars that are great for whipping people up into an emotional frenzy" hardly seems like being about a group of people, and btw violates "be nice" policy (although I don't mind at all).
    – KolA
    Aug 14, 2019 at 15:36
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    I disagree to that "rude ~ productive" theory you are trying to build up here. I don't think that being friendly makes one less productive, but it definetly has a positive impact on the recipient. Therefore being rude just serves no purpose, there is no reason to be rude. Aug 14, 2019 at 15:42

2 Answers 2

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The problem - with all these discussions, not just this contribution - is one of perception; especially in a multi-cultural venue such as Stack Overflow.

What's off-putting in some cultures is acceptable in others; and what's considered correct will differ, as well.

At this point, what I'd like to see from all sides is tolerance and a bit more objectivity. If something isn't a direct, personal attack, people should give others the benefit of the doubt and let things go.

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  • I would suggest that in multi-cultural venue which Stack Overflow is it's impossible to find common intersection that will satisfy everyone i.e. everyone needs to be flexible not just those who find it difficult to strictly adhere to "be nice" principle. And I'm not suggesting to cultivate bullying or discrimination by any means, sorry if it appeared that way. Just something simple as "don't alienate or prejudge people simply because they are direct"
    – KolA
    Aug 14, 2019 at 15:33
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    @KolA I agree. Were you around when the whole "be nice" campaign started up last year? That's what is still reverberating and makes it so difficult to find a good balance, currently, with "who you are" and "being correct". fbueckert 's answer is also a good point. Keep it professional is how I like to phrase it. Aug 14, 2019 at 15:38
  • I wasn't an active user a year ago at all, and definitely should get better at searching duplicate questions
    – KolA
    Aug 14, 2019 at 15:44
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    @KolA Well, I'm not sure this is so much a duplicate as your not having the background experience the "old-timers" have gone through the last eighteen months, or so. And I suspect moderation may have removed some of the more, mmm expressive... content. Also, coming across such things after-the-fact doesn't transmit the underlying, emotional impact felt at the time. People (long-time contributors) are still leaving the site due to the longer-term consequences of the "be nice" campaign. So there are still lots of open wounds that aren't visible :-) Aug 14, 2019 at 15:54
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    This is exactly right. In no culture is it truly acceptable to not be "nice", but the definition of what is nice is culture-bound. In China, it's quite rude to directly point out an error made by someone else. Compare this with, say, Israeli or Scottish culture, where it's normal to speak freely, and even sometimes use "colorful" words in a playful manner. That's why, IMHO, a policy like "be nice" is never going to be truly effective in preserving everyone's feelings. Aug 14, 2019 at 15:56
  • @CindyMeister. "I suspect moderation may have removed some of the more, mmm expressive... content. " Yay, I can be nice! :-) since it's not deleted
    – KolA
    Aug 14, 2019 at 16:11
  • @RobertColumbia maybe some tiny subset of recommended "newspeak" to express degrees of disagreement or criticism could be a good compromise (added to the question)
    – KolA
    Aug 14, 2019 at 16:14
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Content is important, absolutely. That is what we strive to maintain, eliminating noise, cruft, and other bits and bobs that generally focus on people instead of content. It's the whole reason SO was created in the first place, after all.

The ideal is fantastic, and is what most long term users work towards. But...we're people. Ideals are awesome, until you inject people into them. You have to account for how people work, at least a little bit. Maybe not in the content itself, but how you address others.

Tone plays a big part in that. Being direct isn't a bad thing in my book; I'm direct. Cheerfully blunt, most of the time, in fact. But I've learned the hard way that it often comes across as rude; people aren't emotionless automatons, nor Vulcans. Whatever it is you're trying to say gets lost in the delivery, and now you've either lost your audience, or it's been sidetracked by their problem in your delivery, instead of focusing on the point you've made.

I've also seen users justify rudeness as that's just the way they are. Culture plays a big part in that, and what's acceptable in yours may not be in another. And, well...being blunt is who I am, too. None of that changes that others are not you, and don't work the same.

The best way to put your best foot forward is to focus on the content. If you're arguing with someone, don't attack them, attack their argument. "That point makes no sense because of X, Y, Z" is going to be far more acceptable than, "That point is idiotic and you don't know what you're talking about." That's not a way to effectively defend a position.

Most of all, interact with others in good faith; there's going to be times when someone says something in a way you personally don't like. Assuming that they're just not aware of it works best for everybody.

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  • this answer resonates with me, however I would say "Whatever it is you're trying to say gets lost in the delivery" is a two-edged sword: the same way importance or severeness of criticism can be lost in comfort of niceness.
    – KolA
    Aug 14, 2019 at 16:02
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    @KolA That's something I certainly agree with, and something I've used to argue when people think others are being rude. But I think there's a balance between conveying the point, and doing so in an effective manner. You don't have to wrap it in feel good words, but neither is it a good idea to be so direct it gets lost in the tone. One thing you will run into is people looking to be offended, and those you will never be able to make happy. Interact in good faith, though, and it'll work out.
    – fbueckert
    Aug 14, 2019 at 16:17

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