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I would like to know if it's possible to tune the Community account in Stack Overflow Enterprise?

Some of the automated activity is ruining the experience in our Stack Enterprise implementation. For example,

  • The volume of posts that are bumped exceeds the number of questions asked or answered on a daily basis. The effect is that by morning, all of the previous days new activity is already below the fold or on page two. I want the human activity to be front and center rather than the bot. It's discouraging to new users when their question swiftly disappears. I would like to set the max number of posts that can be bumped within a day.

  • The ability to blacklist certain Tags from the Community account would prevent obsolete questions from getting bumped. Like any company we have internal systems that get retired, policies that change, etc. and when those topics are no longer relevant, the bot should not bump those questions to the top any more. Besides making the content look stale, nobody is going to answer them, or vote on them, and they could in fact be confusing to users.

  • We need the Community account to not bump questions from users that have left the company. Since they're gone, no answer can be marked as answered. And more often than not these questions have quality issues, so nobody upvotes, and they just keep coming back.

  • NEW: Bumping questions should not take place over the weekend when there is no user activity on the site. As an example, tonight (Sunday night) on our front page there are 34 questions bumped by the Community account, and 14 from employees. Most of the 14 are from the handful of active users and moderators. So all of the activity from last week is now below the fold, on page 2, etc.

Is there a way to address this in the current software? If not can this be a feature request?


Related posts that provide some insight:

  • 3
    Huh... this is interesting. I'm not sure how flexible the bot is but I'm curious... are there answers on these questions? On the network sites, the bot only bumps answered questions where the answer/s is/are zero score. So, voting (up or down) should prevent the question from being bumped. Accepting the answers isn't necessary. Here's an explanation of when the Community User bumps posts on public sites: meta.stackexchange.com/a/184511/284336 My (patchy) understanding is that most behaviors between the live sites and enterprise sites are similar/the same. Apologies if that's incorrect. – Catija Aug 7 at 20:25
  • Yes, upvoting answers can mitigate some of it, but often it would be arbitrary and then you're upvoting and awarding rep for the wrong reasons – 5eleven7 Aug 7 at 20:44
  • 3
    Downvotes work, too. Community won't bump a post where all of the answers score less than zero, either. On the Stack Exchange sites where this is problematic, it tends to be because there's not enough voting for the site. It's not that answers are wrong or low quality, it's because no one bothers to vote. I've often wondered if internal SO instances would suffer from something similar since, if there's only one answer and it gets posted by the person everyone trusts... why bother? I can't see your Enterprise instance, so it's 100% possible that's not the case, it's that verification is hard. – Catija Aug 7 at 20:48
  • 2
    I've definitely had times on sites where there's only 1-4 questions getting bumped but they get bumped every month, like clockwork... and no one knows if the answers are good or not because of how niche the question is. ... and it gets really frustrating because of it. If I remember correctly, we actually created a special case where an answer can't be bumped for another 90 days if it's already been bumped once... which means it'll only come up a few times per year. – Catija Aug 7 at 20:50
  • You are totally right about the lack of voting. Currently we have 26k users and only 1.5k first upvote badges awarded. I don't have exact metrics because I am not one of the administrators. – 5eleven7 Aug 7 at 20:53
  • 1
    There is not only a small fraction of users upvoting, even fewer people are willing to downvote a co-worker. Pretty much only the moderators and a handful of developers familiar with the public Stack culture downvote and set flags. – 5eleven7 Aug 9 at 4:23

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