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TL;DR:

  • This would apply To META ONLY. This should not have any effect on the main site whatsoever.
  • Partial answers are and have always been allowed, though they have historically been discouraged through community voting habits.
  • Many post partial answers to meta questions via comments, but that's now discouraged
  • An oft-encouraged alternative is to post these partial answers using the Answer box
  • Partial answers in the answer box often come across as not well thought out, even when they are Community Wikis, and are therefore downvoted, even if they might have good ideas.
  • Instead, we can use a clear visual signal and clear guidance (via a link to this question in the stub template) to foster community participation in editing such posts into shape.
  • I'm not proposing a new rule. I'm proposing a cultural shift in how we as a community handle a subset of partial answers, and a commonly agreed upon clear signal with the goal of triggering the alternate response that I'm hoping for to these answers from the community.

This is a really long post, and I'm sorry for that, but I promise that all of it is necessary, and I'm trying to address all of the community's concerns and clarification requests. I really think that those reading this post should read it in its entirety before judging the proposal.


I'm fairly certain most of us have seen this text at some point on Wikipedia:

This article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Stub

With the primary goal of a frictionless option for partial answers to encourage:

  • those with partial answers to post their partial answers using the answer form instead of the comment form, and
  • the community to jump in and help flesh out such partial answers instead of downvoting them because they aren't fleshed out

... and a secondary goal of providing a standard avenue for elevating partial answers posted as comments to proper answers and preventing the premature deletion of said comments with this avenue (more on this later in the proposal).

I propose that we introduce a new and very simple format ON META STACK OVERFLOW ONLY specifically for posting partial answers and call them "stubs".

What is a stub?

A stub is a partial answer whose author has willfully forfeit ownership of the answer with the goal of constructive edits by the community and discussion resulting in a clear and fully-fleshed out answer.

  • The poster should mark the answer as community wiki, and
  • include the following template text at the top of their answer:
> This answer is a [stub](https://meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/388135/this-answer-is-a-stub-a-partial-solution-for-partial-answers-on-meta).  
> The author has renounced ownership of this answer. You can help by editing this post.

---

Posts following this format are hereinafter (in this question) referred to as "stubs" or a "stub".

Why do we need stubs?

We need this on Meta because people are afraid to post partial answers, and the community generally responds to partial answers with downvotes. We need a clear signal to the community that the poster of an answer knows that it is a partial answer and would like the community's help fleshing it out. They may not be able to do so themselves for any number of reasons.

We need this because posting partial answers as comments is also not ideal. Doing that creates a barrier to further discussion about the partial answer, but may inspire others to create a full answer on the topic so they aren't completely without merit. It becomes problematic when there are many partial answers posted as comments in a single thread, or when those partial answers spark discussions that aren't relevant to the post that the comment thread resides under.

I personally want this because I often have a fear that my partial answers will be downvoted solely because they are partial answers and have not been fleshed out, and they will be judged before they have a chance to be fleshed out. Also because I may not have the whole answer. I may only have a one little part of an answer, but I know that with the right people we could come up with a really good whole answer. Instead I have historically posted my partial answers as comments and have attempted to respond to discussion they may have sparked in the comments, and have been disappointed when those discussions get moved to chat or deleted. This is not a good option, and we need a better, frictionless avenue for this kind of thing.

What should I do when I see a stub?

  • If you feel you can expand on, improve, or clarify a stub in any way, while keeping the core idea intact, feel free to edit it.
  • If you feel that some part of the stub is unclear or additional information is required, feel free to request clarifications or additional information in the comments. Such clarifications or additional information can come from any member of the community.
  • If you think that the information contained within the stub is inaccurate, feel free to edit it for accuracy.
  • If you don't think you have anything to add or clarify, that's fine. You don't have to add anything.
  • If what you have to say doesn't fit with the core idea of the stub, you should write a new answer, possibly as a stub!

When should the stub template be removed?

Once the answer is well and truly fleshed out (i.e. no longer a stub), the first line of the template text can be removed and the answer will be a normal community wiki answer.

What should I do if I see a partial answer posted as a comment and would like to discuss the idea?

  • You could politely ask the user to consider elevating their partial answer from the comment section. Something like this:

    @user I'd like to discuss your <position/concern/criticism/argument>, but the comment section here isn't suitable for that discussion, and such a discussion would likely be deleted or moved to chat if it were to take place, negating any effort that we put into clarifying or discussing your <position/concern/criticism/argument>. Would you consider elevating your <position/concern/criticism/argument> from the comment section so that it can be discussed? Possibly as a [stub](https://meta.stackoverflow.com/q/388135)?

  • Post a new stub (possibly linking to the original comment in the answer somehow to prevent confusion), then invite the author of the comment to discuss the partial answer under the new stub in a comment replying to the original comment.

How should the original comments be handled?

Once the discussion has been started under the new stub, or it is clear that the author of the comment has been made aware of the new stub, the comment can be flagged as no longer needed. Moderators reviewing such flags should investigate to determine that a stub or other partial answer has been created, and that the author of the original comment has been made aware of the stub. If so, they should delete the original comments.

When should I downvote stubs?

You should still downvote if you fundamentally disagree with the premise of the answer, or think an answer is not useful; however, please refrain from downvoting these answers on the basis that they are partial answers, or are unclear. Instead please comment to request clarification and additional information, or submit an edit to the effect required.

Please leave a comment (preferable over a downvote) on the basis of a perceived lack of research effort, formation effort, or any other kind of effort-lacking-ness if you aren't able yourself to improve the answer with edits. That is going to come with the territory of partial answers. They will inherently be lacking in some way and we need to help polish them into the best possible version they can be.

Won't posters abuse this format to prevent downvotes on their posts?

Users should still downvote bad ideas as they see them, or answers that they don't think are useful. I'm not saying that should change.

Now if posters use this format and simultaneously show that they are not open to edits or constructive discussion, you should feel free to vote as you normally would. As I say later, the voting recommendation isn't a rule to be enforced by anyone, it's just a recommendation that I hope users reading this will heed.

Can you give a couple of examples for which this would be relevant?

There have been multiple examples in the comments here of partial answers that have been elevated to full answers, one of them as a stub (it was never a comment, but it is an example of a stub). The original comments have been removed as they are no longer needed.

There are yet more examples of partial answers posted as comments under this question that haven't yet been elevated to answers. I would like to discuss and clarify these partial answers, and have requested that the authors of those comments elevate their partial answer comments to answers, possibly using the stub format, but I cannot discuss those partial answers or clarify them in the comments because such discussions would inevitably be deleted or moved to chat, therefor wasting any effort I may put in.

Why the boilerplate which most users would not find if it's not in a help topic or coded into the answer editor?

The idea here is that people who read this question will start suggesting to those posting partial answers as comments that this is an option and link here, or start posting stubs on behalf of commenters as I suggest in this proposal.

Aren't you just saying that partial answers are acceptable and people should get used to them?

Partial answers are acceptable, and people should get used to them; however, there is an inherent issue with partial answers and the longstanding rules around post ownership. If it isn't clear that the answer poster knows that it is a partial answer and is open to the community editing it or helping to flesh it out, the community will generally react with downvotes as opposed to constructive discussion and edits to clarify or flesh it out.

This happens regardless of whether an answer is community wiki due to widespread misunderstanding of the feature, and because of that widespread misunderstanding, even if you do understand the purpose of the feature, you can't ever truly be certain if the person posting a community wiki answer understands the purpose. Therefore there is an initial barrier that you must overcome before investing your efforts in such a post. This removes that barrier and goes one step further to say that the author knowingly no longer has any more say in the ultimate formulation of the answer than any other member of the community, blowing that barrier to smithereens.

This is to create a clear signal to the community that edits of all shapes and sizes are welcome to such posts, and the normal ownership rules have been willfully forfeit in the goal of constructively fleshing out the answer.

How is this new rule going to be enforced?

It won't be enforced, because it's not a rule. It's a proposed cultural shift in our handling of a specific subset of answers with a clear visual signal to prompt the alternate reaction that I'm hoping for, with clear guidance for the community via a link to this question in the stub.

There is absolutely nothing stopping anyone from ignoring this completely and handling these answers as they normally would, but I'm hoping that this will catch on and I'm banking on the good will of the community to make it happen.

This isn't a perfect solution, and it isn't meant to be. I could propose feature changes and rule changes, but this is something we can actually do with the features and rules we have right now, we only need to change how we interact with these answers.

We can prevent the premature deletion of partial answers posted as comments, and we can create a standard avenue for elevating these partial-answer-comments to actual full answers and stimulate further constructive discussion in a healthy manner. We just need to work together.

Final thoughts specific to this meta question:

  • This is absolutely a rough draft of this idea.
  • If you feel that you can clarify this proposal meaningfully, please feel free to edit it.
  • If you feel that something in this post is unclear, or there is information missing, please feel free to request clarifications or additional information in the comment section here.
  • If you have concerns about or criticisms of this proposal, or you have arguments for or against it, please post them as answers. They cannot be discussed in the comments here, and if they are discussed, any such discussions will be deleted or moved to chat.
  • If you feel that the answer that you're about to post qualifies as a stub, feel free to use the stub format.
  • If you do not intend to honor the spirit of this proposal, please do not use the stub format just to be funny. It's not funny.
  • 27
    You say that we need stubs because we need partial answers, and we need partial answers because... well, they're acceptable anyway. That doesn't seem like a particularly strong case for why these posts are worthy not just of being kept, but of being edited and worked on others to 'flesh out' an idea. Devil's advocate--doesn't an answer being so incomplete people decline to post them, and are downvoted if they are posted, heavily imply that the answer has not been adequately considered, and may ultimately be incorrect or fruitless after further fleshing out? – sinaraheneba Aug 5 at 1:24
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    "the community generally responds to partial answers with downvotes" Do they? – Clonkex Aug 5 at 2:00
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    I don't understand the point of this suggestion. How can there be a partial answer in Meta that others should flesh out? Can you give a couple of examples for which this would be relevant? – Cindy Meister Aug 5 at 7:17
  • 14
    This is NOT meant for main. It says so in the tile title, it is tagged meta. Answers stubs tries to solve a problem on Meta and on Meta only. – rene Aug 5 at 9:20

12 Answers 12

86

I really don't think that this is a good idea. Besides the fact that it will require other users editing the post to get a good, well-written post (which, sadly, most people aren't willing to do), having other users edit it to fill it in may cause slight differences of opinion and wording that may make it hard to read or understand the post.

Instead, simply just create an answer (community wiki if you so wish) and edit it as you think of ways to improve it and fill it in later. As this is a per-site meta, it won't affect your reputation if people receive it badly.

If people are afraid of leaving answers and instead leaving comments, then we can simply suggest to create a community wiki answer with their idea. If people feel the need to improve it, they can do so without having to be explicitly asked.

The same would apply with answers to technical questions: Simply create a community wiki answer, and if some of the information in it is out-of-date, invalid, or needs improvement, people can edit the post without having to be asked.

Basically, what I'm saying is that this feature is already implemented, and already in use. Creating another name for it won't change anything.

That said, if you want to do this, nobody's stopping you.


Despite what I said here, I'm going to try this out. Here's the relevant chatroom.

DAY 1:

After only 15 hours, I see why people don't like this idea: It will add unneeded fluff at the top of the answer that will distract from the actual content of the answer.

DAY 2:

A mod removed the template from the top of my answer. Guess that's the end of this idea.

  • 3
    The whole point is that a lot of users prefer to comment instead of simply just create an answer. The point is that when Meta attracts fresh idea's from new users it is a burden to flesh those ideas out in comments. And as most Meta regulars have passed the point that they immediately spot a potential good idea, having an extra mechanism to lift those pearls out of a lengthy comment thread does help to make needed changes and be welcoming and helpful to those new contributions. – rene Aug 5 at 6:42
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    The point is that people don't respond that way to partial answers even if they're community wiki right now. The status quo is that such answers are downvoted to oblivion and rarely encounter constructive discussion or edits. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 16:28
  • @TinyGiant Where are you getting this information from? – JL2210 Aug 5 at 16:33
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    @JL2210 from years of experience on meta. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 16:39
  • @TinyGiant then we must fix the voting culture on the meta first... (if it's possible)! Someone can just downvote it for any reason. How can that rule be enforced? Asking mods to retract the downvotes while the answer is a stub? – Andrew T. Aug 5 at 16:57
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    @AndrewT. I'm not proposing a rule. I'm proposing a cultural change to how a specific subset of answers are handled by the community with a clear visual signal to prompt the alternate reaction that I'm hoping for and clear guidance for the community via a link to this question in the stub template. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 17:36
  • @AndrewT. I believe my latest edit has addressed your concern as well. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 18:04
  • "Basically, what I'm saying is that this feature is already implemented, and already in use." That is the point, I'm not proposing a new feature, I'm proposing a cultual shift to the way that a certain subset of answers are handled by the community. "Adding another label to it won't change anything." The point of adding the label is to create a visual cue with the goal of triggering the alternate response that I'm hoping for. It isn't supposed to change anything but how we react. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 21:32
  • I've also explained in the proposal about the misunderstanding of the community wiki feature, how that creates an inherent barrier to investing your time contributing to an answer that you didn't originally author, and how this proposal would not only remove that barrier, but blow it to smithereens. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 21:34
  • @TinyGiant The community isn't going to handle an answer differently based on a copy-and-pasted quote box on top of the answer, nor for one user. See latest revision. – JL2210 Aug 5 at 21:34
  • "The community isn't going to handle an answer differently based on a copy-and-pasted quote box on top of the answer, nor for one user" Why not? The only thing stopping us from doing so is us. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 21:34
  • @TinyGiant You're free to do whatever you want, as is anybody else who wants to do this. As I said before, nobody's stopping you. – JL2210 Aug 5 at 21:38
  • 1
    So why are you saying that it isn't going to change anything. If everyone but you decided to do this, it would still change things. If a reasonable portion of regular meta users started doing this, it would change things. I'm having a hard time understanding what your position here is other than "I don't think it will work, so I'm not going to." – user4639281 Aug 5 at 21:40
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    @TinyGiant How about I give it a shot for a week. I'll give you the results and see how well this works. Keep in mind that the most highly-upvoted answers are against this idea, and the one answer that agrees (and the question itself) are highly-downvoted. – JL2210 Aug 5 at 21:46
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    I would be immeasurably grateful if you were to do that. If we could all just give it a shot, see how it works, and judge it after we gather some data on the efficacy of the proposal. Who knows, it may actually be a really bad idea in the end, it may cause all sorts of confusion, I don't know. What I do know is that if we don't try, it will never get better, only worse. I tend to prefer better over worse, even if it takes a bunch of effort and trying to be better could end in complete failure. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 21:50
44

This might work for Wikipedia, where they are writing an encyclopedia.

In meta it's more often about opinions, two people from the same premise will come at two completely different conclusions.


I'll try to make my point a bit clearer using examples.

At Wikipedia:

userA [create new page] "foobarbaz (Animal)"
+ "The foobarbaz is an animal."
admin [edit] "This is a stub"
+ "{{stub}} [The fooba.."
userB [edit] "Add scientific name"
+ "The foobarbaz] (bazis foobarus) [is an ...
userC [edit] "Add information about Habitats"
+ "an animal] living in teapots[.
...

While at Meta-Stackoverflow:

userA [answer]
"{{stub}} I don't like foobarbazes."
userB [edit] "Add reasons why foobarbaz sux"
+ foobarbazes] because they sing creepy songs[.
userA [rollback] "I actually like these songs"
userB [edit] "Add reasons why foobarbaz sux"
+ foobarbazes] because their color is dull[.
userA [rollback] "Their color looks good to me"
...

This system makes sense when writing about facts, but you can't (and shouldn't?) delegate the building of your opinion to a third person.

I agree, I'm using an exaggerated example of a "stub" here, which may not match what you had in mind, but you get the idea.

And that's actually one of the biggest flaws in this proposal. You are talking about "partial answers" as if it was a thing, but always fail to point to any.
I sincerely don't know what you are calling a "partial answer". An answer that even treats only one aspect of a [discussion] post is still a complete answer. In a [discussion] you don't need to treat all the aspects of the question, to give your opinion on a single point still makes for a valid and complete answer.

If I try to find such examples in my experience, I've got some comments where I question a proposal based on "feelings", because I miss the real data to be able to validate what my gut says. So sure I could have posted it as a "stub" answer, wait for SEDEman to come help us with actual data etc. But what if the data proved me wrong? What would have been the benefit of marking this unsure answer as a "stub"?

In a now deleted comment someone did direct my attention to the "first ever stub" (paraphrasing, if someone remembers the real quote, feel free to edit). Their point if I got it correctly was that this answer starts with "I like," and thus is a good example of how "stubs" do work even for opinion writing.

This answer even at first revision was not a stub. This is a complete answer, with an opinion declaration and a few points to explain that opinion.
It is a good example of where community wikis are useful, since it started what seems to be a non-exhaustive list of reasons why their opinion is good.
But the big header adds nothing more than what does provide a

Non-exhaustive list, feel free to add more points.

note under or above the list like we already have here and there.

And, I'm sorry, but after 24 hours all this answer got was a formatting edit and a LOLcat.
Not sure that's such a great example for your case...


Now, if we try to come back at this proposal's premise, what it is trying to accomplish is full of good wills and I like this.

You are trying to help clean-up the comments and to make the little heards take their stance to post actual answers.

However, it's been pointed out a few times in the comments that this system will probably raise even more noise in comments, when instead of having comments on the opinions exposed, we will now also have "meta-comments" about how such opinions should be worded...

Also, I'm really not sure about what I'm going to say, but I've got the feeling that if people don't want to post an answer, and either post only an easily ignored/deleted comment or even keep silent, it's because they fear the community's response to their opinions. I don't think it's because not every one has strong opinions, or is not able to build a complete answer but more that not every one is willing to expose publicly their opinions as being theirs.
If it is really what we want to fix, then maybe a better feature would be to be able to post anonymously on meta, where the poster's id would be hidden only to non-admins. But that's really just the {{stub}} of an idea.

  • 5
    While this is not un-true I don't understand why this is an argument to NOT have answers that start as stubs, for example "opinions" that started off as a good comment. It encourages sharing opinions and allows the community to better express their conclusions, be it by voting or by comments under the answer stub. – rene Aug 5 at 6:45
  • Maybe it would work for "Community Wiki" questions on the Stack Exchange network. – Anderson Green Aug 5 at 19:02
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    @Anderson I think there's a common misunderstanding here: TinyGiant is proposing that we use the Community Wiki feature (like it's meant to be used), but simply put a small snippet of text at the top of partial answers to remind people. – Cullub Aug 5 at 19:05
  • There have been multiple partial answers posted as comments here that were elevated from the comment thread. None of them as stubs so far, but those partial answers were there, then they were encouraged to be posted as answers and did so. They chose not to post stubs and instead post normal answers, so be it. There were also multiple answers here posted as stubs that do actually match the spirit of the proposal, at least one example of its use in the wild (on my phone or I would link it). Also, there are multiple examples in the comments on the question that I would like to discuss but can't.. – user4639281 Aug 6 at 4:13
  • ... due to the fact that they aren't posted as answers, but rather as comments on my question. I've requested that the posters elevate their partial answers, but they have yet to do so. – user4639281 Aug 6 at 4:14
  • Also, your last paragraph is exactly what this proposal aims to negate... up until the anonymous posting feature idea. Features are highly unlikely to be implemented at this point, and the purpose of this proposal is that we can do it as a community with the features and rules we have in place right now. We don't need to change anything except our own perceptions of and responses to a certain subset of answers. We can do that, right now. – user4639281 Aug 6 at 4:17
  • I feel like the middle of your answer completely misses the point here though. It's so far off base I don't even know where to start. Though I do agree the initial stub answer is not exactly a good use of a stub. The idea would be to post a stub as one concept, idea, what-have-you, that isn't entirely fleshed out, and have the community expand on that core concept, idea, what-have-you. Saying "I like this" or "I don't like this" and asking the community to expand on it is not constructive, and posting a list of random thoughts is also not constructive. – user4639281 Aug 6 at 4:18
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    Usually these partially answers don't occur in the wild as lists of random thoughts or just a plain old "I like this"/"I don't like this". So, it's kind of inventing a problem with the proposal that just doesn't exist. – user4639281 Aug 6 at 4:22
  • 1
    I agree your example shows a potential pitfall but that still can be valid exchanges to work out the line of reasoning. Disagreemeent and misunderstandings are natural and specially these days on Meta where there is one big mess of distrust. Having a record on how a proposal / opinion / position came about seems useful here, specially if it is confined to an answer with their edits and comments, instead of being scattered among see 1337 more comments – rene Aug 6 at 6:45
15

This answer is a stub. The author has renounced ownership of this answer. You can help by editing this post.

I think this adds much noise to a Q&A, especially when stubs are meant to replace comments. Instead fix the actual problem (comments).

  • The problem is not comments, but rather that partial answers are posted as comments, and there is an inherent barrier to elevating partial answers from the comment section, clarifying them, and discussing them. The comment section is not the right place for partial answers, but the community has historically discouraged partial answers in favor of comments through downvoting and commenting to that effect on partial answers. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 20:59
  • Now we have the added problem of increased comment moderation causing these partial answers to disappear outright instead of being clarified or discussed at all, which is not a good outcome. This isn't a perfect solution, and isn't meant to be. It is the best I can think of that we as a community can do right now with the tools at our disposal. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 21:01
  • As a side note, it has actually worked effectively multiple times on this discussion. Maybe not in the use of the stub format, but in partial answers posted as comments actually being elevated from the comment section, clarified, and discussed. It actually works! Regardless of the community's apparent distaste for the idea. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 21:02
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    Suppose we suggest to use this format until the actual problem is fixed. Will that be an option? – rene Aug 6 at 6:38
10

I think there's a few issues here - while this is almost an appropriate use of the community wiki process, I don't get the idea of a partial answer and how the CW process helps with fleshing those out.

Effective meta or even populist meta needs folks to think out what they're doing - the trouble with meta is effective meta needs folks to actually understand the system, and somehow manage to find major flaws (or even minor ones) in a system that has evolved over time.

The idea of ownership of an idea is also important if you consider meta in terms of a political construct. Would you rather trust someone who's willing to put in time and energy to routinely post fleshed out answers which they're happy to work on as input comes in over someone who decides to throw their answer, not fully grown, into the deep end of the pool, so someone else can teach it to swim.

This also somewhat reduces the incentive to iterate on an answer - and quite frankly, if its a great idea people want to contribute to - why is it just a stub?

As for community wikis, I've often felt that on main sites, its a failed experiment. MSE has legacy ones, but there's rarely a great/compelling reason to use a CW any more.

Fundamentally - wikipedia is a community-collaborative knowledge base built on breadth. They'd rather have a stub article for someone to build on. Great SE posts have depth, and meta isn't purely a knowledge base.

Fundamentally for a well functioning meta site - we need people to answer and have their say. We don't want people just throwing out what comes to mind without a reasonable amount of consideration either. Having a jerryrigged "content-lite" post and hoping folks pick up on it seems... contrary to that.

  • 1
    Community wiki is explicitly for posts that are the work of multiple people. That is exactly what I'm suggesting it be used for here, multiple people coming together on an answer to make one good answer out of a core idea. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 16:15
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    "This also somewhat reduces the incentive to iterate on an answer - and quite frankly, if its a great idea people want to contribute to - why is it just a stub?" I don't understand why it would reduce incentive to iterate, or how an idea being an idea can preclude it from being a stub. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 16:19
  • 1
    "Great SE posts have depth, and meta isn't purely a knowledge base." does every single post ever made have to have depth and be a great answer immediately after being posted? That isn't the goal here. The goal is to lift partial answers out of comments where they can absolutely not be iterated on or edited, and prevent the deletion of said partial-answers due to the fact that they were posted as comments. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 16:21
  • 2
    "Fundamentally for a well functioning meta site - we need people to answer and have their say. We don't want people just throwing out what comes to mind without a reasonable amount of consideration either." I don't agree with that statement at all. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 16:23
  • 1
    "Community wiki is explicitly for posts that are the work of multiple people." I wish it's true, but I deleted my CWed answer stub. Yeah, it's not yet the work of multiple people, but the author can just delete it anytime (well, until it's undeleted, locked, or the author is suspended). – Andrew T. Aug 5 at 17:09
  • @AndrewT. I'm not proposing any feature changes, that would be nice but highly unlikely. My proposal relies heavily on people's good nature and hoping that when it comes down to it, people will do the right thing. It isn't perfect by an shape of the word, but in my opinion it's better than outright deletion of partial answers that are posted as comments on meta. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 17:40
8

Partial answers are and have always been allowed, though they have historically been discouraged through community voting habits.

You are making a distinction between the community's will and the site's tools, one which does not need to exist. If the community discourages a thing, it doesn't matter if the site's tools technically allow it. It's still not a good thing. Just like if someone posts a bad answer, the site allows it, but that doesn't mean it shouldn't be downvoted.

We are against "partial answers" on Meta for many of the same reasons as for main:

  1. It disrupts voting as a means of approximating quality. This is even more the case for meta content, which can be much more opinion based. If someone radically changes the post, that can essentially invalidate the votes on that post, since it may make a good idea into a bad one or vice-versa.

    Yes, it can happen when the OP edits their posts too. But when you make it OK for anyone to come along and make major edits, you massively increase the chance for this to happen. Particularly well after interest in the question has died down.

  2. It encourages FGITW-style behavior. Get in first with your partial answer, no matter how unfinished it is. Oh sure, it's a community-wiki answer, but MSO doesn't keep track of rep anyway. The only thing CW does is make it easier to edit the post. It's still your post; it shows up in your list of answers. And you still get (non-tag) badges for voting on CW posts, after all, so there's some benefit to FGITW behavior.

Partial answers are not good content; at best, they are placeholders for good content. Your post never tells us why we need placeholders.

So as far as I'm concerned, them being "historically discouraged" is the correct behavior.

An oft-encouraged alternative is to post these partial answers using the Answer box

No, the alternative is to post answers, not pithly one-offs or half-baked concepts that someone else has to come along and actually turn into something useful.

Partial answers in the answer box often come across as not well thought out, even when they are Community Wikis, and are therefore downvoted, even if they might have good ideas.

Well, yeah. We want good content. That means discouraging bad content. We do this on main all the time; we don't give CW answers any special consideration, just because they might get better.

Either we vote on the basis of content, or we don't.

Instead, we can use a clear visual signal and clear guidance (via a link to this question in the stub template) to foster community participation in editing such posts into shape.

To what end? To what purpose?

First, the number of genuine "partial answer" comments is pretty small. Most comments are requests for clarification, responses to such requests, responses to responses, arguing about site rules, indignation at someone's entitlement, indignation at the indignation at someone's entitlement, or otherwise just drifting off topic via thread-moding into minutiae. None of which constitutes a "partial answer" to a question. So even if this were to go into effect, it wouldn't actually change much. Not unless your definition of "partial answer" is so broad as to be "basically any on-topic comment".

Second, if we are to hold off on judging an answer "to foster community participation in editing such posts into shape", when exactly do we actually get to judge it? An hour? A day? A week? How long should we wait before making a judgment? Again, we don't wait on the main site, CW or no: we vote based on what we see.

If those "partial answer" comments were to go away without becoming proper answers... would the site be worse off? I don't think so.

For example, you claim that the reason people aren't making them answers right now is fear of downvotes. I contest this. MSO has no penalty for downvotes, so the sting of them is basically irrelevant. Yes, you say that you personally are afraid of them, but that's not everybody.

The only time I could see fear of downvotes being a legit thing is if the downvotes come from an innate quality of the post. That is, you're saying something unpopular. Sometimes, people will make a comment or series of comments that defend unpopular ideas. They post them as comments because comments can't be downvoted. So if they happen to fetch one or two comment upvotes, their position looks like it is more solid than it really is.

But that has nothing to do with being a partial answer; it has to do with offering unpopular opinions on a site with up and down-voting.

I may only have a one little part of an answer, but I know that with the right people we could come up with a really good whole answer. Instead I have historically posted my partial answers as comments and have attempted to respond to discussion they may have sparked in the comments, and have been disappointed when those discussions get moved to chat or deleted.

But... this wouldn't change that.

OK, let's take your example. You post a "little part of an answer" as a comment. Other people reply to it, spawning a discussion thread. This thread gets put into chat/deleted, which is bad because... reasons.

In your world, you post your "little part of an answer" as an answer. Then... what happens? If they reply to you in comments, then the same thing happens. It goes into thread mode, and it will eventually get put into chat/deleted, which is bad because... reasons.

So, how do you fix the problem? Do you want the discussion to happen by having those users make edits on the post, asking you for questions/more specificity about your idea? Do you want the discussion to happen by them posting answers which reference your answer, and you just go back and forth referencing each other?

So this doesn't fix that problem.

The solution to thread-mode is not to try to put the threads under answers. The solution is to make it easier for people to just take things to chat when it starts to happen. Chat is not a four-letter word... OK it is, but it's not that kind. Chat threads should not be thought of as some kind of purgatory for bad comments; it should be thought of instead as a way to preserve the thread and allow it to continue without junking up the main site with what is undoubtedly either not particularly relevant or otherwise too trivial for most users to have to wade through.

There have been multiple examples in the comments here of partial answers that have been elevated to full answers, one of them as a stub (it was never a comment, but it is an example of a stub). The original comments have been removed as they are no longer needed.

I contest this. The so-called stub answer was adequate in its first version; it did not need fleshing out. Yes, there were additions made to it, but the OP has made the most changes, and everybody who edited it would have been able to do so if it weren't a CW.

So this is not an example of your system working. Indeed, none of them are. They are examples of how the advice "post answer content as answers, not as comments" works, not your advice of "let's be tolerant of incomplete answers". Do not mistakenly conflate the two.

We can prevent the premature deletion of partial answers posted as comments

And therein lies the most important point, one which you take as an assumption but is never actually addressed: why should we want to prevent their deletion? Why are they good content? Why are they useful to the site?

Basically, your proposal boils down to "the mods are getting delete-happy on comments, so let's make it OK to post the stuff that would have been deleted in a form they won't delete." At no point do you stop and ask "is it actually worthwhile to keep that stuff around? Isn't it better to just have people provide answers with real substance, instead of encouraging them to do what they would have done, just in a different place?"

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    "And you still get badges for voting on CW posts" the only you get are non-tag badges, so it doesn't translate to actual power. – Braiam Aug 7 at 10:43
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    I don't think doing nothing is the right solution, but if the community believes that the better option is just to outright delete any partial answers posted as comments as well as any attempts to clarify or discuss such partial answers then I guess it is what it is. I think we're going to lose a lot of valuable contributions. – user4639281 Aug 7 at 15:34
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    @TinyGiant: "I think we're going to lose a lot of valuable contributions." What is the value in an incomplete post? That's one of the things you really haven't demonstrated in your question. The "examples" from this post that you give were not provided as incomplete answers; all of those answers were reasonably complete in their first versions. None of these people were afraid of downvotes; they just naturally preferred to post comments rather than a full answer. Once told to do so, most of them did, and those were full answers. Where do "partial answers" come in? – Nicol Bolas Aug 7 at 15:42
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    I don't know, maybe just because I've seen it happen countless times in my experience here on meta. I don't have specific examples because it was over the course of years. If the community wants to refuse to see the possibility of value here, that's fine. I just figured that I wasn't the only person in the community that recognized their value. Like I said, if the community consensus is to just delete them immediately and inhibit communication from the community at large then it is what it is. It's sad, but it is what it is. – user4639281 Aug 7 at 17:21
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    @TinyGiant: Why do you consider asking someone to post a real answer to be equivalent to "inhibit[ing] communication from the community at large"? Most questions that get long comment threads do get complete answers, ones which typically cover the (genuinely useful) stuff in the comment threads. So what is being "inhibited"? – Nicol Bolas Aug 7 at 17:24
  • @NicolBolas Because you're saying that they should post an answer instead of trying to use the comments, but if they try to post an answer and haven't completely fleshed out their idea, it will be downvoted to oblivion solely because it isn't fully fleshed out. So in essence you're saying that unless they have a fully fleshed out idea they should keep it to themselves, that is inhibiting communication. Comments aren't the appropriate place for them anymore, and answers aren't the appropriate place, and this proposal for an appropriate place is a failure, so there is no place for them. – user4639281 Aug 7 at 17:32
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    @TinyGiant: That all depends on how you define "completely fleshed out". I've seen plenty of ideas that were not "completely fleshed out" which were not "downvoted to oblivion". My experience has been that most answers that are met with downvotes are so met because they are, to some degree bad or unpopular, not because they're not "completely fleshed out". Can you offer examples of answers which were clearly downvoted due to not being "completely fleshed out"? Because thus far, nothing you've said about this correlates with my experience on the site. – Nicol Bolas Aug 7 at 17:58
5

I think that's a good idea actually. However, I don't see why the stub text is needed. Isn't this already what we have available to us via community wiki answers? It seems to me that the main point of this is to encourage partial answers. Can we do that without adding another construct here? Maybe just reply to comments that could be partial answers and tell them that?

That looks like a partial answer [link] to the question here. Posting answers in comments is harmful because it circumvents the voting system here. Go ahead and post it in the answer box below, and feel free to expand as well!

  • The point is that currently community wiki partial answers aren't treated any differently than normal partial answers, largely I imagine this is because of misunderstanding of the purpose of community wiki, this is an explicit marker to the community with clear guidance (via a link to this question) as to what that all means. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 17:33
  • The change here is really going to be a cultural one around how we interact with a specific subset of answers with a clear visual signal to help trigger that alternate reaction. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 17:34
  • Ah, so basically what you're proposing is a small piece of text to use above partial answers letting other people know that it's fine to edit? – Cullub Aug 5 at 17:38
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    Basically, being as explicit as possible. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 17:41
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I'm skeptical about this suggestion, more or less along the lines posted in JL2210's answer (the community wiki). Plus:

  • Personally, I'd find the stub text distracting and "in the way", especially if it's at the top.
  • I imagine most people would be leary about editing their own opinions into someone else's contribution, especially since this "workaround" primarily targets discussions rather than factual topics.

I think it would get more traction if the person posting a question that is likely to have reactions in comments would create a chat room and post the link to it as part of the question. Advantages:

  • Discussions currently in comments could automatically start there
  • Less work for mods
  • Since mods can only move to chat once, the danger of things getting lost or disconnected would be reduced
  • After discussing, people could then post more carefully considered answers
  • Occasionally, the OP could edit the question with an update about any important topics being discussed in chat, so that readers will have an idea whether it to look in. Or anyone else could post a comment to such an effect.
  • The whole point of this is to have a visual cue to drop the whole "be leary about editing their own opinions into someone else's contribution" part of the problem. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 19:31
  • Partial answers in chat are less visible than partial answers in comments. I'm trying to make them more visible, and more permanent. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 19:32
  • Also, chat isn't very good for fleshing out partial answers to the question, because such chats tend to encompass more than just fleshing out an individual partial answer and things get left behind very easily. It is more likely that such partial answers would be ignored than anything constructive coming from it. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 19:33
  • @TinyGiant Well, in that spirit I sat and looked at JLL 2010's Answer, thinking about how I could fit my thoughts in... and decided, no. It just didn't feel right. If there are any "partial answers" in chat, and someone feels good about them, there's nothing stopping anyone from puttting them in an answer. People don't (and shouldn't) write answers when they don't feel the content is ready. And there's nothing stopping another person from putting what s/he feels is important information originally contributed by someone else into an answer, to make sure it gets seen and voted on. – Cindy Meister Aug 5 at 19:35
  • "If there are any "partial answers" in chat, and someone feels good about them, there's nothing stopping anyone from puttting them in an answer" My point is that they won't be seen, and therefor no one will put them in an answer. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 19:36
  • "People don't (and shouldn't) write answers when they don't feel the content is ready." I completely disagree. Sometimes stuff isn't ever going to be ready until other people see it and give their opinions on it. This proposal wasn't ready when I submitted it, it needed a lot of edits in the first hour, and many more later on. It's still probably not ready, and won't be until it has been fully fleshed out with the help of the community. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 19:37
  • "Well, in that spirit I sat and looked at JLL 2010's Answer, thinking about how I could fit my thoughts in... and decided, no. It just didn't feel right." that's a perfectly acceptable response. If you don't feel that what you have to say fits with what someone else is trying to say, there's no need to shoehorn it. You would edit a stub if you feel you can expand on it or clarify it meaningfully, while keeping the core idea intact. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 19:39
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    I'd like to point out that you butchered my username. – JL2210 Aug 5 at 21:19
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    @JL2210 Yeah, sorry about that... – Cindy Meister Aug 8 at 21:39
2

I think that this proposal could make sense. This answer is an attempt to show how and why it could make sense. As such, this answer does not cover all details and aspects that may be relevant for others, and although not explicitly marked as a "stub", ... it is, probably.


First of all: There's probably not much controversy for that proposal to be applied to purely technical answers.


For non-technical answers, I think that this approach could still make sense: Meta has been squeezed into the pure, lean, focused Q/A format that made stack overflow great. But this format is not great for discussion, and being restricted to the Q/A format made certain discussions far more difficult and chaotic than they had to be.

As it is worded now, the proposal seems to focus on the point of explicitly marking an answer as a stub, turning it into a community wiki, and encourage edits and changes. Some skepticism is justified here. There might be premature downvotes, edits that change the sentiment of answers, or maybe even edit-wars...

But my interpretation of the broader goal of this proposal is that it aims at spreading out the discussion over several answers: Instead of discussing 5 different points in the comments of a single question, each point could be raised (if worthwhile) into an answer, and the possible discussion (for that one particular point!) could be done there.


Of course, there is some (naïve?) optimism involved here. It would require some change of "discussion culture" on meta. The comments of the partial answers would still contain cross-references to other (partial) answers and arguments. But there's at least the chance that it might prevent things from derailing too quickly. So I think it could indeed help to keep the discussion more clean and civil and focused, and prevent important points or arguments from being lost in escalating comment threads.


Sticking to the exact wording of the proposal, I don't think that this concept of "being a stub" has to be institutionalized like that. Something similar could be achieved by starting the answer with some sort of disclaimer, roughly like this:

This answer only addresses this-and-that point. It ignores that-and-this, and makes this-or-that assumption. I think this aspect should be discussed separately here.

Right now, something like this would likely be downvoted hastily and garnished with a comment: "You cannot ignore that-and-this!!!111". But I think that using "(Stub) answers as 'a poor man's forum thread'" could indeed be helpful in order to discuss individual aspects of complex topics properly.

How well it would work? That's hard to tell. Let's try it out.

  • This comment of mine doesn't really add anything, I'll get to that later once I've had more of a chance to consider your post, but I would like to thank you for elevating your concerns from the comments and in chat to this answer. It definitely makes it easier to consider, clarify, and discuss, all in a manner that is much more visible to the larger community. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 22:28
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    On the de-railing aspect: if the discussion derails under one answer, a mod can lock the answer, instead of having to lock the whole Q/A. same goes for move to chat. But you're right that it needs cooperation of all involved. – rene Aug 6 at 6:36
1

The problem stated by this question is

Many post partial answers to meta questions via comments, but that's now discouraged

You want to solve it by

It's a proposed cultural shift in our handling of a specific subset of answer with a clear visual signal to prompt the alternate reaction that I'm hoping for, with clear guidance for the community via a link to this question in the stub.

And you make it even more explicit in your comment

If everyone but you decided to do this, it would still change things. If a reasonable portion of regular meta users started doing this, it would change things.

So, the way I see it, instead of changing the site to better serve the community, you want to change how the community behaves, to better serve the site and the needs of the company that runs this site.

This isn't some kind of proposal to bow to the company or anything like you seem to be suggesting. It is for us, by us, to help us communicate better with each other and everyone else. It is to elevate useful content and discussions from the comment section before they are purged or moved to chat.

Useful content and discussions on meta could have stayed in the comment section, as it used to be. The moderators' decision, apparently caused by concerns expressed by the company, was to start purging and moving that content to chat. I did not intend to accuse anyone of "bowing to the company", but I see this proposal as nothing more than attempt to adapt to this change.

In my experience, I've seen numerous attempts to improve things for "everyone", that would have worked only if everyone had changed their behavior.

Let's see how far that will get all of you (us?) this time.

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    The only option i have is to appeal to the community. Any proposed feature changes would be highly unlikely to be implemented at this point. I want to do the best with what we have available to us so that we can all have the best experience possible. This isn't some kind of proposal to bow to the company or anything like you seem to be suggesting. It is for us, by us, to help us communicate better with each other and everyone else. It is to elevate useful content and discussions from the comment section before they are purged or moved to chat. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 23:52
  • "Let's see how far that will get you." I find that rather rude and dismissive. – user4639281 Aug 5 at 23:54
  • Also, you've lead up to an argument in your answer... but it's unclear what your actual point is. Would you mind clarifying that? – user4639281 Aug 5 at 23:55
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    Sorry if it sounds rude, that was not my intent. The point is that changing people behavior is much harder than implementing technical features. – artem Aug 6 at 0:03
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    Well technical features ain't likely to get implemented, so we can either gripe about not being able to get technical changes implemented, or we can do what we can with what we have available to us. This proposal is something that we all can do, right now. No feature changes necessary. – user4639281 Aug 6 at 0:04
-1

If the goal is to prevent valuable opinions, criticisms, and arguments from being lost to moderation, we need to actively encourage people to post those things as answers. You've successfully done that numerous times on this question.

That said, none of those comments were really partial answers. In the context of a discussion, simply stating an opinion or criticism probably qualifies as complete; so, they don't really require the purported protection of a stub. This leaves me wondering what kind of content you're trying to protect.

As far as opinions, criticisms, and arguments go, we can guide people into answering without the use of a boiler-plate header and the notion of relinquishing ownership. It's just going to take long-term, consistent effort... engaging people through comments until they get the idea.

  • This completely misses the point, yet again. – user4639281 Aug 7 at 17:22
  • Note that I explicitly said that if users disagree with the core idea of an answer they should still vote as they normally would. The only thing I asked is that these answers not be downvoted solely on the basis that they were partial answers. I never said that we should stop voting on the merit of an idea. – user4639281 Aug 7 at 18:42
-8

It seems that the consensus here, as far as I can tell, is that this shouldn't happen and the community would rather any partial answer comments as well as any attempts to clarify or discuss these partial answer comments should be immediately deleted. Partial answer comments hold no value whatsoever, and if you would like to contribute to the discussion, you should have a fully fleshed out answer ready to post or keep it to yourself.

I will now start flagging such partial answer comments for deletion as I see them, and If I have something to say but don't have a fully fleshed out answer ready to go, I'll just keep it to myself.

  • I don't understand the downvotes on this answer. Is this not the consensus? It definitely appears so given the multiple answers that say this that are upvoted, and anything that says anything different is heavily downvoted. I don't understand – user4639281 Aug 7 at 17:35
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    Maybe it needs a stub marker? But in all honestly you're not just stating / summarizing the consensus, you spice it up with your own opinion and we already learned from the question that you much liked your own idea. That doesn't need a new answer. So ether get rid of the personal pride things and write an overarching consensus answer or just let it be and delete it – rene Aug 7 at 17:42
  • @rene I've removed the opinion statement. – user4639281 Aug 7 at 18:10
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    In the context of a discussion, simply stating your opinion probably counts as a complete answer. I wouldn't advocate deleting those. So, I'd still love to know your distinction between partial and complete/incomplete. Sorry I'm still so confused. :/ – canon Aug 7 at 18:19
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    @canon all but four of the comments on the question are partial answers posted as comments or attempts to clarify/discuss those attempted answers. As such, all but those four have been flagged. I mean, I did even ask those people to post their partial answers as answers instead of comments so they could be clarified and discussed, but they have refused to do so. In the future, I'll just flag instead of asking for the partial answer comments to be elevated. – user4639281 Aug 7 at 18:37
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    ... or you could continue asking people to post answers instead of throwing your hands up after two days because people disagree with this whole "stub" idea. Several people did write answers after you engaged them. I commend you for that. – canon Aug 7 at 18:44
  • ... or I could just follow the community consensus and continue to flag such comments. I put enough effort into this proposal and was repeatedly dismissed by users who didn't bother to read the whole proposal. I think flagging is enough effort for the future if people don't want to just post answers. Who knows, maybe the routine immediate deletion will encourage users to post answers as opposed to comments. – user4639281 Aug 7 at 18:47
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    @Tiny I don't see a consensus here on flagging these comments. Your proposal is not about flagging, nor even about interacting with these comments that could be answers if the commentator had — more time to flesh it out — more confidence in their saying — more will to handle the answer's maintenance — ...whatever made them not post an answer. Your proposal is about adding a header to some answers so that it receives a special attention. Please only see a consensus about this. Also, we're probably a few being thankful for this post may have been a head-up for some commentators like this. – Kaiido Aug 8 at 4:40
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    I think you fully misinterpret the "consensus", as others have pointed out in their comments. Reasons why people don't want to post "stubs" or edit others' contributions were mentioned a number of times. As other comments have said, there was no mention in the question about anyone actively flagging comments for deletion. No one (that I've noticed) has objected to being encouraged to post comment content in an answer. Or having the content of their comments written to an answer by someone else. The whole point was not losing valuable input, yes? So what matter if there's a "stub" or not? – Cindy Meister Aug 9 at 15:36
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    And if over-zealous moderators feel they need to police these discussions, well, they have to decide how to best spend their time... – Cindy Meister Aug 9 at 15:36
-20

This answer is a stub. The author has renounced ownership of this answer. You can help by editing this post.

I like this idea. Some benefits include:

  1. Sometimes users comment useful things instead of fleshing them out into a full answer, whether it's due to lack of time, or not having enough references on hand, or a number of other reasons.

  2. Since moderators are looking to keep comments more cleaned up, it would help separate and streamline discussion by making it easier for such content to go into answers.

  3. It can help decrease the barrier of entry for users who are new to Meta by making it easier for them to share their thoughts, and letting them find posts that they can easily add their own research and ideas to.

  4. Sometimes it just takes a lot of time and people to figure things out

  • Reminder: MSO users only can view posts until they have 5 rep. – zixuan Aug 5 at 1:20
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    I don't see how the 5 reputation comment is relevant here, there are new users to Meta with 5 reputation and with 500,000 reputation, many users from all over the place come to Meta and have bad experiences because they don't know what to expect. I simply suggest that this would help lower that barrier between expectation and reality by giving another way to participate in Meta. – Davy M Aug 5 at 6:00
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    MSO users only can view posts until they have 5 rep. That must be a typo. Even without an account you can view posts. Viewing of non--deleted posts is never restricted, on any site in the SE network. That feature doesn't exist. You must have confused it with the minimum rep of 5 needed to be able to POST on Meta. – rene Aug 5 at 6:33
  • @rene that's how I read it, i.e the only thing user can do if they have less than 5 reps is view posts. – Matt Ellen Aug 5 at 8:58
  • @rene I meant "in MSO". – zixuan Aug 5 at 17:05
  • I do have one great insight about this idea: even though, users with any rep feel welcome to the community when they the post a stub and a poster recommends editing the answer. – zixuan Aug 5 at 17:17
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    @zixuan I meant in MSO still doesn't make sense. You can always view posts. – rene Aug 5 at 17:29
  • @Rene I think yours and Zixuan's comments spoke past one another; Zixuan's comment about 5 rep does grammatically indicate that the only permission of a user is to view posts until they have 5 rep. Since you said there must be a typo, when really it's just unclear but technically correct phrasing, Zixuan misunderstood where you thought the typo was and guessed you took issue with the comment starting with "MSO" and not a qualifier to say "In MSO." – Davy M Aug 6 at 2:10
  • @DavyM ah, that makes sense. So we are all good then. One issue solved ... :D – rene Aug 6 at 6:30

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