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This question already has an answer here:

I am hereby humbly asking for clarification of this text in the FAQ "What do the colors on Stack Overflow mean?" (my question is not a duplicate of the FAQ, it asks to clarify one small part of it) :

Creme-colored, "highlighted" questions contain one watched tag that is not explicitly queried; the highlighting is possible only if there are no search criteria other than tags.

If I display the questions which are tagged abap and contain the words ALV refresh, and among my watched tags is sap, I would expect that the questions tagged sap are highlighted with the creme color:

creme-colored/highlighted questions

As you see, none of the questions are highlighted with the creme color, although they are assigned the tag sap that I watch:

enter image description here

Can someone explain why (and clarify the FAQ), possibly with some examples?

marked as duplicate by Bjørn-Roger Kringsjå, gnat, Zoe the transgirl, Stephen Rauch, il_raffa Jul 28 at 16:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • I'm surprised by the quantity of "does not show any research effort". One month ago, the FAQ ("Creme colored, "highlighted" questions contain one of your favorite tags.") was incorrect because I had one question containing one of my watched tags, but it was not highlighted. Then I corrected the FAQ today, and I created this question to explain how it really works. How should I reword it please? – Sandra Rossi Jul 28 at 15:50
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Here are some examples for each case:

  1. No search criterial at all -> highlight of questions which contain at least one watched tag
  2. One or more tags searched (only) -> highlight of questions which contain at least one watched tag that is not searched
  3. Use of search criteria other than tags -> no question is highlighted

1. No search criteria at all

If the user watches the tag python-3.x or astropy but not reactjs and react-pdf, only the first question below is highlighted:

Question list - No search criteria at all

NB: the corresponding "search" URL is https://stackoverflow.com/.


2. One or more tags searched (only)

Two examples, one with one tag searched, and one with two tags searched.

Questions tagged [tag]

If the tag python-3.x is searched, and the user watches the tag csv but not python and excel (and whatever python-3.x is watched or not), only the first question below is highlighted:

Question list - One tag searched (only)

NB: the corresponding search URL is https://stackoverflow.com/questions/tagged/python-3.x.

All Questions tagged [tag1] or [tag2]

This example is not so different from the case with only one tag. Note that this example would also work if the search would concern questions containing both tags ("and-ed" tags using [tag1] [tag2]).

If questions with the tag pycharm or reactjs are searched, and the user watches the tag javascript but not c# (and whatever pycharm and reactjs are watched or not), only the first question below is highlighted:

Question list - Two tags searched (only)

NB: the corresponding search URL is https://stackoverflow.com/questions/tagged/pycharm+or+reactjs.


3. Use of search criteria other than tags

If the term csv is searched within questions of tag python-3.x, no question is highlighted, whatever the tags csv, beautifulsoup and html-table are watched or not - The highlighting is inactive because some search criteria other than tags are used (here, the term csv) - In short, it's inactive in all "Search Results" views:

Question list - Use of search criteria other than tags

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    Why did you feel the need to post a new question when simply posting this as an answer to the other one would have sufficed? – jhpratt Jul 29 at 0:51
  • @jhpratt Mine is one tiny aspect of the other question, I prefer to separate. The FAQ is a broad question, it's not forbidden to have other questions around it. If a question is broad, it's better to link to the details described & answered in other questions, that's a matter of hierarchization. – Sandra Rossi Jul 29 at 6:39

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