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On multiple occasions, I have begun to compose an answer to a question, and have put a great deal of time and effort into constructing diagrams, and making graphs, only to discover that, by the time I am actually ready to submit my answer, the question has been closed by a moderator.

My usual process is to first convince myself that there is a clear thing that the OP wants, then to research the problem, in case there already exists a solution on Stack Overflow, and then, in case I do not find one, to begin working on a solution and a relevant explanation. However, my ideas of what constitutes a clear question, or what questions are sufficiently covered by answers to other questions are not universal, and sometimes a moderator has a different conclusion about whether or not a question is clear and/or solved.

Most recently, I have spent at least 2 hours constructing an answer to this question. The question seemed clear enough to me, and seemed to ask a sufficiently different thing from this question and also this question. Since there is not some objective "duplicateness" metric out there, I can only judge for myself. Having spent 2 hours composing an answer, I have returned to discover that it has been closed. Asking that it be reopened got a response that I, essentially, do not have standing.

This particular example is mostly irrelevant. The point is that this has happened to me more than once, and I have spent a great deal of time answering open questions, only to discover that in the meantime they have been closed. This is incredibly frustrating, and causes me to feel as though my time spent answering questions on SO is wasted.

What am I doing wrong here? How can I better focus my time? Does anybody else experience this?

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    I sympathise with the problem. However, I guess we need to be careful to ensure that "on-topic" does not come to mean "I spent lots of time composing an answer". Sadly, some things just are off-topic. – halfer Jul 25 at 15:45
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    Where this has happened to me in the past, I put what I can on a Gist, and add a link in the comments, so the effort is not wasted. Of course, you can separately lobby for a question to be reopened too - perhaps by going to the relevant chat room. – halfer Jul 25 at 15:46
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    @halfer "we need to be careful to ensure that "on-topic" does not come to mean "I spent lots of time composing an answer"" I agree with this statement. "Sadly, some things just are off-topic" I disagree with this statement. The definition of on-topic is vague enough to allow a lot of discretion to the individual doing the closing, and I think intentionally so. This is good, because it prevents a lot of "paperwork" when closing a question, but creates a situation where what is off-topic is not always crystal clear. – Scott Jul 25 at 15:56
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    I think that this trade-off was made consciously. My question is mostly that, given the non-crystal-clarity of off-topicness/duplicateness/other-closable-offensiveness, what can I do to avoid spending time answering such questions? – Scott Jul 25 at 15:57
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    The question you included the link to is not closed now FWIW. – Dave Jul 25 at 16:14
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    Linked question sure seems overly broad with zero effort shown to make an attempt at a solution or reflect any research effort. Even if it's not a duplicate ; being too broad sure seems like valid off topic reason. That said, have had same thing happen numerous times over the years – charlietfl Jul 25 at 16:16
  • One thing you can do is compose your answers offline, or in another tab, (or in a Gist as mentioned by @halfer), and refresh the question periodically to view its current state. You could theoretically waste less time that way. – Heretic Monkey Jul 25 at 16:42
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    @Scott "The definition of on-topic is vague enough to allow a lot of discretion to the individual doing the closing, and I think intentionally so" err... no. There are a lot of things that are very explicitly off-topic, such as polls, questions asking for opinions, shopping list questions, questions asking why a something was implemented the way it was, questions asking for off-site resources, etc. There are yet more questions that may be on-topic if they include the requisite information necessary to answer the question. – user4639281 Jul 25 at 16:50
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    The subjectivity only really exists in the "Too Broad" and "Unclear what you're asking" close reasons. – user4639281 Jul 25 at 16:50
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    Probably you need to spend more time thinking about whether the question belongs on our site and whether it meets our quality definitions before answering. If it's questionable, wait until it becomes clear. If experienced users are commenting and pointing out flaws with the question, then follow their lead and wait until attempting to answer. Just because someone asks a question doesn't mean we must answer it. – mason Jul 25 at 17:58
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    Depending on why you answering the question, the situation isn’t so dire. As you have spent 2 hours, i assume you don’t do it (only) for rep - your goal to learn something is already achieved. It sucks that the work isn’t documented - you could add your answer to a duplicate target or create and self-answer a Q&A, if this is different enough and on-topic. – ead Jul 25 at 18:59
  • @ead "your goal to learn something is already achieved" this is true. :) However, I am a teacher at heart, and was a university instructor for years. As such, my motives are mostly not selfish in nature, and so when I set out to answer questions, it is not for rep and not for my personal benefit, it is to benefit those who are asking questions. – Scott Jul 26 at 7:58
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    I have to ask - you write elaborate answers which take several hours to complete. You are as you say drawn to questions where the asker seems extra confused. One seems to follow from the other in my eyes. Are you not forced to write answers which require a great deal of effort because you have to cover too many bases? Wouldn't it be better to try and take away some of the confusion first through comments so you can write a more to the point answer? Because that will at the same time help to stop questions from being closed... – Gimby Jul 26 at 9:55
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    The help center specifically requires that "You should only ask practical, answerable questions." The "correct" question might be "Why can't we invert an RGB to grayscale mapping?" But this implies that the asker knows that such a mapping cannot be inverted. This 1) isn't the question that occurs to people, though and 2) isn't, ostensibly, a programming question at all!, even though "How do I invert an RGB to grayscale mapping?" is. – Scott Jul 26 at 10:53
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    It will help a bit when you get to 3K rep (I think that's the number), so you can see if there are already some close votes on the question. – Don't Panic Jul 26 at 17:54

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