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This question already has an answer here:

(I am writing this post because the help page “What are declined flags, and what should I do about them?” suggests this.)

In a nutshell, I flagged this answer as “Not an answer”. To make it clear why I think so, here is a paraphrase of the answer, which leaves out only irrelevant(!) details:

My initial theory about the difference between A and B was […]. But it turns out I was wrong, and I don’t know what the difference is.

The flag was declined with the justification

flags should not be used to indicate technical inaccuracies, or an altogether wrong answer — [moderator]

However, the answer neither contains “technical inaccuracies”, nor is it “altogether wrong”. In fact, it’s correct. It simply doesn’t answer the question, at all. Instead, it’s an anecdote about the author’s failed attempt to answer the question.

I therefore proceeded as outlined in the help linked above, and flagged the answer as “In need of moderator intervention”, explaining this:

My flag was declined, saying “flags should not be used to indicate technical inaccuracies, or an altogether wrong answer”. However, to clarify: this answer is not technically wrong, and this is not why I flagged it. I’ve flagged it because it does not answer OP’s question at all (see the comment stating the same thing). Combined with the high low-quality answer volume on this question, this “answer” adds substantial noise. — [me]

This flag, too, was declined:

That still doesn’t make this “not an answer”. If it is a wrong answer, downvote it. — [moderator]

But, as mentioned, the answer is not wrong. In fact, it seems the moderator didn’t read my explanation properly because their reply seems to ignore it.

At this point I double-checked the official guidelines for the “Not an answer flag”. Unfortunately, the answer in question is not exactly described by either the points under “When should I use this flag?”, nor the points under “When should I not use this flag?”. However, the guideline also says:

If it seems blatantly obvious to you that what you're looking at isn't an answer, you're probably using the flag correctly.

So: Is it blatantly obvious?

To somebody familiar with the technology (), the answer is obviously “yes”: Not because I say so, but rather because the answer has a highly upvoted comment by a senior user of R which says the same thing:

this is interesting, but isn't really an answer to the question ... ? – Ben Bolker

How to proceed? I’m fine with just dropping it; the only reason I’m even writing this is because (a) the help page explicitly told me to, and (b) this answer presents its information in a meandering and easy to misunderstand way and, I suspect, misleads beginners who skim the answer. Furthermore, the question already has many low-quality answers and this non-answer adds noise.

marked as duplicate by ivarni, HaveNoDisplayName, Robert Longson, Code Lღver, double-beep Jul 17 at 14:27

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    I should add for context that this answer currently has a positive vote tally despite not being an answer. The reason for this is almost certainly not due to its merits but rather due to an initiative a few years ago to raise R’s profile on Stack Overflow by mass upvoting answers. This has led to a temporary phase in which all R questions and answers gained an inflation of upvotes, regardless of merits. – Konrad Rudolph Jul 17 at 10:28
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    The Not An Answer flag is for things that aren't an answer at all. If it is an answer, but off topic for the question (Say, someone posts how to do bubble sort in java to a question asking how to malloc in C), use a moderator flag to explain why it is off topic. However, Not an answer isn't "this doesn't answer the question," it's "This isn't an answer at all," meaning to any question. In isolation (not looking at the question), this looks like it is very possibly an answer, so NAA is not appropriate. – Davy M Jul 17 at 10:35
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    @DavyM Respectfully, looking at it “in isolation” doesn’t make sense to me. The answer isn’t present in isolation, after all. – Konrad Rudolph Jul 17 at 10:35
  • There's at least a couple of posts a week about declined NAA flags so I wouldn't be surprised if the early downvote is from someone who read the first 2 paragraphs, looked at the linked answer and figured "oh it's this again". – ivarni Jul 17 at 10:36
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    @ivarni It’s not a duplicate, it’s a specific dispute resolution request, as suggested by the relevant help page (first link in my question). – Konrad Rudolph Jul 17 at 10:38
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    @KonradRudolph NAA doesn't literally mean NAA. It means it's not an answer in the sense that it's supposed to be a comment or questioning or something else. I've had similar issues, I really think we need to change the text for NAA to clarify what it should not be used for. – Script47 Jul 17 at 11:05
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    NAA is in a bad spot. I got a declined NAA flag on an answer that literally said can't comment because of the required rep and something that clearly wasn't an answer, but that first part got edited out, and got lots of downvotes on my meta question about the declined flag. – Erik A Jul 17 at 14:06
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    @ErikA: The number of times that we find people flagging answers because it starts with can't comment but then proceeded with actually answering the question is to numerous to count. So no, you really can't take can't comment because of required rep at face value. – Martijn Pieters Jul 17 at 14:41
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    @ErikA: if you remove the excuse from the post, does it look like an attempt at answering? Then don't use the NAA flag. – Martijn Pieters Jul 17 at 14:42
  • When it comes to voting, note that it doesn't matter that the post is not incorrect. The litmus test should be: is the answer helpful in solving the stated question? If not, then vote it down. If this is an interesting side note or whatever, and not actually answering the question, vote it down. – Martijn Pieters Jul 17 at 14:44
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    @MartijnPieters To reference that old discussion again, here is the link, and no, the author didn't attempt to answer there, he attempted to add information to an existing answer. Still got declined, even though in the end Samuel ended up editing the answer to be improved and deleting the answer I flagged. Of course I don't flag because of that comment, I flag because it isn't an answer. – Erik A Jul 17 at 14:47
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    @ErikA: By the time you flagged that post as NAA, the excuse had been edited out already. That said, I'd probably have deleted that one on the strength of the NAA alone, since it starts with For the accepted answer to work on 64-bit Excel. A custom flag (such as the one you used later on) is often much better for such cases, as it connects the flag and post to things not visible on the flag dashboard. – Martijn Pieters Jul 17 at 14:50
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Try searching Meta for "not an answer flag declined" or "NAA". This has been discussed ad nauseum.

The Not An Answer flag is meant for:

  • Posts containing obvious garbage, or
  • Posts that obviously contain a new question.

If it isn't either of those, don't flag it as such, because it will end in tears.

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    Thanks for your answer but the official guidelines — to which I refer — disagree. See section “But I'm still not sure if I'm using the flag correctly...” (Incidentally, I did search, and I believe the case is very different from most other discussions.) – Konrad Rudolph Jul 17 at 10:37
  • That the answer is incorrect, or tries to reason about an answer, does not make it not an answer. The poster says "I thought the difference was [blah], but the docs say [blah]". That is an attempt to answer, you cannot deny that. I know it's hard to wrap your head around, but if you follow the guidelines given in my answer you'll never be hurt again by this flag. Just downvote the incorrect/partial/guess-answers you encounter and move on. – CodeCaster Jul 17 at 10:41
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    But as explained the answer is not incorrect. And the text is not an attempt to answer, it’s a description of a a failed attempt to answer. I don’t think that distinction is very subtle: It’s not a pipe, it’s a picture of a pipe.. By your argument, writing “This is an attempt at an answer” is an attempt at answer. This argument is obviously flawed. – Konrad Rudolph Jul 17 at 10:42
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    @KonradRudolph yes. That piece of text cunningly uses the word "probably", which means guarantees are instantly out the window. You flagging for mod attention and the mod disagreeing is entirely within the range of possibilities. You did all you could do, now it's time to let it go. NAA flags don't generally stick to answers which kind of sort of look like it answers some question somewhere on the site. (edit: darned, didn't type fast enough) – Gimby Jul 17 at 10:45
  • @Gimby I completely agree with your comment, but I felt that I had a very strong case for “probably”, given that this opinion is shared by many people who had actually read the answer and upvoted Ben’s comment, and that the moderator handling my flag had clearly misunderstood the reason for flagging (since they assumed I thought the answer as wrong). Either way, I wouldn’t even have raised this issue on Meta, and only did so because the help page explicitly advises doing so. – Konrad Rudolph Jul 17 at 10:50
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    @Konrad I don't agree either, see for example my question Not An Answer flag declined #24. It's just that moderators don't really read or interpret the text of an answer when flagged as NAA. The "official guidelines" can say so much, but mods deny that flag when the flagged post isn't obvious garbage or a new question. – CodeCaster Jul 17 at 10:52
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    @CodeCaster Right, and this much is totally OK. I used to be a moderator, I know how impossible it is to do every flag justice (part of the issue, besides the volume, is that the UI for moderation is godawful; Stack Exchange acknowledges this without fixing it). Which is why the help page explicitly suggests clarifying matters here, on Meta. – Konrad Rudolph Jul 17 at 10:54
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    Posts containing obvious garbage, - if you mean cats on keyboard-kinda garbage, that's incorrect use. Use spam, or rude or abusive instead. – Zoe Jul 17 at 11:31

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