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I have a suggestion for the community: We should upvote an answer, not only by its quality but by the ease-to-adopt as well.

That means that a question will more likely to be upvoted by the community if the code is in function or based on whether or not there are comments about what should be replaced instead of demo values and so on...

The reason why I think this type of answer should be rewarded with extra upvotes is that a code which is easy to adopt is that these types of answers are more likely to actually help the people which asks the questions, especially if the people who ask the question are beginners who wants the functionality of the code without the need to understand it, but not only, it's always better to have an easy-to-adopt code.

Do you think it is a good idea to take the ease-to-adopt as a parameter in the decision of whether or not to upvote?

closed as unclear what you're asking by Alexei Levenkov, Daedalus, Robert Columbia, Sotirios Delimanolis, Stephen Rauch Jul 9 at 22:49

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    How do you define, "easy to adopt"? Votes are a judgement of quality and usefulness; if an answer is good and can be implemented with minimal effort, it will naturally garner more upvotes. – fbueckert Jul 9 at 20:49
  • @fbueckert " if the code is in function or based on whether or not there are comments about what should be replaced instead of demo values and so on..." – user11722523 Jul 9 at 20:50
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    A function can sometimes be too much code that readers need. Code in a function doesn't automatically mean it's a good answer, either. It can still be wrong, or the wrong approach. – fbueckert Jul 9 at 20:52
  • @fbueckert I refer mainly to functions; I think they are underestimated in terms of upvotes and I think based on my experience on StackOverflow that people don't take think about how easy is it to adopt when before voting. – user11722523 Jul 9 at 20:55
  • @avivgood2 Not all answers are in functions, though. You have yet to provide compelling evidence this is a good idea. – Daedalus Jul 9 at 20:56
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    TL;DR: you encourage code only answer that are ready to use by a simple copy past? I don't agree ... – Temani Afif Jul 9 at 20:58
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    Sometimes all people need is a one or two liner. While they themselves might put it into a method, implementation is usually left to the reader. Elevating code in methods as better would lead to less critical thinking, I feel. – fbueckert Jul 9 at 20:59
  • you don't have to agree with me... this is the definition of discussion. but please do not weaponize the downvote button just because you don't agree with me... – user11722523 Jul 9 at 21:22
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    Er. People are disagreeing with you. Are they not allowed to do so? How else are people supposed to represent their disagreement? – fbueckert Jul 9 at 21:27
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    @Avivgood There are valid reasons to downvote outside of disagreement. Hover your mouse over the vote button and a tooltip will appear describing the purposes of votes. One purpose says that it is unclear; I found your post very hard to understand, and didn't get what you wanted until I read the comments. Another purpose says the post is not useful; I don't believe this suggestion is useful for the community, and your argument has not persuaded me. However I haven't downvoted... Only because I'm out of votes for the day though. – Davy M Jul 9 at 21:30
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    Is it a good idea? I don't think so... But if you think it is, then by all means you are free to upvotes these. Oh and please.. don't you weaponize the downvote. No one is using it against you. Don't make it look like they are. – Patrice Jul 9 at 21:32
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    Can you please clarify how your proposal is different from "this answer is useful"? – Alexei Levenkov Jul 9 at 21:42
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    @avivgood2 Weaponize the downvote button? Don't you think you should have a better understanding of how voting works here before you go suggesting changes to it? On top of signalling disagreement, voting is generally different on meta: stackoverflow.com/help/whats-meta – Daedalus Jul 9 at 21:46
  • Voting on Meta proposals expresses agreement or disagreement with the proposed change. I disagree with the proposed change, therefore I downvoted. It's nothing personal either way. – EJoshuaS Jul 9 at 23:03
  • I don't understand the point of this proposal. If you think that an answer is useful, upvote it. Voting merely indicates how many of the voters thought that the content was worth reading - for the purpose of voting, there is no distinction between "worth reading" and "really worth reading," just "worth reading" or "not worth reading." (You can award bounties to reward answers that you think are especially superb, though). – EJoshuaS Jul 9 at 23:06
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Functions don't automatically make an answer better. They can, but it really depends on the answer.

The reason why I think this type of answer should be rewarded with extra upvotes is that a code which is easy to adopt is that these types of answers are more likely to actually help the people which asks the questions

Sure, it will help them. Right now. There's a lot of people looking for answers that require no additional thought from them to achieve. But think about it long term; are we really helping them by just giving them bite sized functions they can copy and paste? Teaching them that critical thinking isn't required when programming does a huge disservice to readers. What happens once they run into a problem that functions can't solve? We've set them up for failure.

especially if the people who ask the question are beginners who wants the functionality of the code without the need to understand it, but not only, it's always better to have an easy-to-adopt code.

Well, like I said, are we really helping them by allowing them to forego understanding? Code only answers are usually pretty poor. Explaining why you're answering the way you are is far more important than a simple function. That gives readers the ability to think about how it fits into their existing code, and how they can implement it.

I'd prefer answers that not only solve the problem, but also explain themselves. I don't want to encourage a process that rewards setting up readers for failure. Functions are neither good, nor bad, so voting shouldn't have anything to do with their existence or lack thereof.

  • "Functions don't automatically make an answer better" indeed, just because you have a function in the code section of your answer doesn't mean it's "easy to adopt". It might still be missing stuff you need which the answerer doesn't know or need to know about. It might not conform to code style. It might not conform to the usual approach and would have to be changed slightly. It's even more complex if the code is not JS - if you're writing Java, should you really create a complete class to show off few lines of code? Do you also have to make sure it integrates with OP's codebase? – VLAZ Jul 10 at 7:01