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I recently came across this (Deleted, check review below) question in triage. I flagged the question as "too broad" because the guidelines for the flag state "Avoid asking many distinct questions at once" and the question asks 5 very distinct questions (7 total). However, 3 other people marked it as "Looks Ok". According to this question, the flag doesn't go into the close vote queue if it is disputed. Since I can't re-flag it for the same reason, is there any action I can take to get that question closed?

Related/Useful: Is a disputed flag still reviewed?, What causes a recommend closure flag to be marked disputed, versus helpful or declined?, Why does this question "Look OK"? (related answer)

Review: https://stackoverflow.com/review/triage/23470007

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    After a certain number of days, you'll be able to reflag. There's also SOCVR but you should read their FAQ & tour. I've joined their chatroom before and found them helpful. – SecretAgentMan Jul 8 at 19:09
  • It's in the close queue and currently has 2 "too broad" votes FWIW. – Dave Jul 8 at 19:19
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    @SecretAgentMan we try to be helpful, thanks. Adding to the comment: when a post is under scrutiny on Meta, we no longer allow active moderation requests in our room on said question. We consider that what is on Meta, stays on Meta. So for this particular question we're out of the loop but feel free to drop in later. – rene Jul 8 at 19:28
  • @meyi Too broad is a good flag for that question. BTW: In practice, the "too broad" flag covers many, many posts which are obviously bad, but not for a reason that is easily articulated. In other words, too broad typically covers the "I know it when I see it" category of bad questions. Accordingly, I don't take the wording of that particular flag description too literally. For example, "extra" questions are sometimes used to narrow the scope of a question rather than broaden it, such as when asking several questions about a narrowly-defined topic. – jpaugh Jul 8 at 19:57
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    @jpaugh That's a good distinction to make. I generally flag as "too broad" whenever the questions asked are unconnected. For example, this question had 5 bullet points with seemingly unrelated questions that just happened to be under the same topic. With that, your approach appears to be much safer and I think I'll start following that logic rather than my current approach to avoid false flagging. – meyi Jul 8 at 20:17
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    Triage is kind of a mess sometimes, unfortunately. On the bright side, disputed flags don't count against you and this particular question is gone now anyway. – John Montgomery Jul 8 at 23:28
  • The question looks to have been deleted now. – Dijkgraaf Jul 9 at 0:04
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    Given the asker's username on that question, it seems like they went into things thinking we'd be unwelcoming before they even posted. I wonder how well the new policies are working out... – Draco18s Jul 9 at 1:54
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    @Draco18s They might have changed their username as a reaction to the question getting closed, but there's no way I'm aware of for a non-moderator to check that. Not that it matters much. – ivarni Jul 9 at 4:12
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    @ivarni The username was that way when the question came up in triage. – meyi Jul 9 at 13:12
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    Three of the four "Looks OK"/"Needs Editing" reviewers have sub-1K reputation, and the other one barely exceeds that. I know that a high reputation doesn't necessarily mean you have a better knowledge of how Stack Overflow should work, but it's one of the only metrics we've got to work with. Triage is one of the hardest queues to review, and none of those users should be reviewing in there. The rep minimum to review Triage needs to be raised severely, or at a minimum you shouldn't have that many low-rep users all reviewing the same item. – LittleBobbyTables Jul 9 at 13:42
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    Fantastic! We managed to chase a new user away from SO. Keep up the great work. – Fattie Jul 9 at 14:15
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    @Draco18s as long as Stack Overflow remains the dominant site to ask programming questions and maintains a policy of only allowing questions of types A, B, and C that meet minimum quality standards of X, Y, and Z; people who want to talk about D, E, or F or that aren't experienced enough to understand what they need to do to meet X, Y, and Z are going to leave here unhappy and ranting about how unfair we war. – Dan Neely Jul 9 at 18:06
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    @Fattie: I'd bet real money that user is not new, will never make an effort to comply to with site guidelines for asking questions, and cannot be "chased away" no matter how hard we try, if that ever were our goal. – James Reinstate Monica Polk Jul 9 at 19:18
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    @Fattie I am afraid it is worst that that. I am periodically blamed because I help too much ! Last time was in stackoverflow.com/questions/56923084/… The guys considering the main goal of S.O. is not to give/receive help but to check rules-are-followed generally fly in group, so down/close votes and finally delete. I am not masochist and don't come to have my ass kicked because I help OPs, I already reduced a lot my presence here, but more and more I just think about to close account and never come back, saving time – bruno Jul 10 at 13:05
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In this case, it's a self-delete by a user after getting six downvotes and five close votes and is probably gone for good.

We note that this happened after you asked your question.

Well, the meta effect got your desired response on the question, but I'm not so sure for the user.

You on the other hand have discovered when when the normal pathways managed to make a serious blunder, posting on meta generally fixes it.

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    A triumph, we chased off another user from SO – Fattie Jul 9 at 23:46
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    @Fattie Judging by other comments it sounds like this user wasn't worth keeping. – John Montgomery Jul 10 at 3:29
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    @JohnMontgomery: I will let others debate that. – Joshua Jul 10 at 3:45

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