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is a Python library to provide parallelism and scaling via drop-in replacement for numpy, pandas and scikit-learn (or at least, a subset of their functionality).

  • However the current tag-wiki excerpt [*] makes no mention whatsoever of Python/numpy/pandas nor performance nor scaling (!!), merely the super-vague, language-agnostic, marketing-buzzword-sounding (and you could make comparable vague claims of Fortran compilers):

Dask is a flexible parallel computing library for analytic computing. It supports dynamic task scheduling optimized for computation as well as big data collections.

  • That's kind of D- grade: by not mentioning Python/numpy/pandas nor performance, the tag-wiki gives no insight into "which community of which language uses this and why would anyone ever use it?", and also will not be easily found by SO or Google search, hence tagging will be suboptimal, also dask questions on SO will not get seen, and machines won't understand the equivalence between dask <-> pandas. Also, that definition is overstatement; dask is not a fully-featured package for "analytic computing" and probably never will come close to that; it's a limited backend to numpy, pandas and some parts of scikit-learn.

    • [*] (yes if you click through to the full tag info page it is marginally better and mentions some but not all of the keywords, and not terse enough, and not sure we need all the URLs. There was some major reverting on that info page.)
  • The one-line warts-and-all tl;dr in the pandas community would be more like:

"Dask is a higher-performance, native, parallel, scalable, dynamic-task-scheduling drop-in backend replacement for numpy/pandas, well at least a subset of it, it breaks on some functionality, and you have to rewrite your code down to that subset to get the performance gains, also debuggability allegedly takes a major hit".

  • That's more accurate but less politic; and I don't know if it's considered bad behavior to say "Y is a higher-performance drop-in replacement for X", explicitly mentioning the other package, even though that's one of the key points here.

Dask natively scales Python: Dask provides advanced parallelism for analytics, enabling performance at scale for the tools you love

  • ...which is maybe a C+ grade offering, even when we replace "the tools you love" with "numpy/pandas/scikit-learn". It does mention "native" and "Python" which is good, but not the rest.

  • Last, dask supports out-of-memory datasets, but then so does pandas with HDFS, so hard to comment on how much better dask is for that.

So: how specifically to improve the tag-wiki? Your suggestions please.

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    Disclaimer, definetly not a subject matter experct. I think you made a great start. Seeing your reputation you could easily make an edit to the wiki and excerpt pages. Looking at their website, the Use Cases page could offer some great info for a wiki. Be sure to paraphrase and make it brief. Don't simply quote it, at risk of plagiarising their content. – Luuklag Jul 1 at 10:35
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I'd never heard of Dask until opening this question and so I'm not going to personally mess with its tag description, but remember that the primary purpose of the excerpt is to provide usage guidance. Describing the qualities of the library in the excerpt is useful only insofar as it helps make the tool recognisable, to reassure a reader that the tag is referring to the same "Dask" that they want to ask about.

With that in mind, why not just something like this?

Dask is a parallel computing and data analytics library for Python. It acts as a partial drop-in replacement for NumPy, Pandas, and scikit-learn, and is included by default with Anaconda.

That will hopefully be enough that almost anyone using Dask - even a bewildered employee on day one of their job who's been dropped into a Dask codebase with no guidance - will feel confident that, yes, the Dask described in the tag wiki is the one that they're using.

(Feel free to use this if you approve of it. And, obviously, if I've made any factual errors due to my ignorance of the tool, go ahead and fix them.)

The stuff at the end of your "warts-and-all tl;dr" about debuggability and rewriting code to adapt to the Dask API - while I'm happy to believe you that it's entirely true - doesn't seem to me like it adds any value in the excerpt.

By the way, regarding this point:

I don't know if it's considered bad behavior to say "Y is a higher-performance drop-in replacement for X", explicitly mentioning the other package

I don't see any reason why it would be bad behaviour. If the whole point of a tool is that it's meant to be an alternative (or an outright superior replacement) for some competing tool, and that's how it markets itself, then that should be mentioned in the excerpt, because that will make the tool more recognisable to its users.

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    Uhuh. "and is included by default with Anaconda" is not relevant. " parallel computing library" is not good enough, it doesn't describe any of the features: "native, parallel, scalable, dynamic-task-scheduling" is probably ok. "and that's how it markets itself, then that should be mentioned in the excerpt" We shouldn't just paste marketing claims, because the flipside is what I mentioned: "well at least a subset of it, it breaks on some functionality, and you have to rewrite your code down to that subset to get the performance gains, also debuggability allegedly takes a major hit" – smci Jul 1 at 17:26
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    @smci I figure "and is included by default with Anaconda" is helpful to somebody who's just installed Anaconda and imported Dask and isn't yet certain whether it's the same Dask as described by the tag. – Mark Amery Jul 1 at 18:46
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    MarkAmery: Well that can go at the bottom of the full (long-form) tag description, not the brief tag-wiki you should see on mouseover, which is my main intent here. We're not in the business of endorsing distributions, and these days users use pip, brew, macports, docker images... as well as Anaconda. It's really irrelevant how they installed it and what it came bundled with - that's a feature/marketing question about Anaconda. Not about dask itself. But yeah can mention at bottom of full tag description. – smci Jul 1 at 18:49
  • @smci Re "native, parallel, scalable, dynamic-task-scheduling" - I view "scalable" as a fluffy marketing buzzword in this context, so left it out. I'm unfamiliar with what dynamic task scheduling is, but if it's a concrete feature then I agree it's useful to have in. I'd leave out "native" both because its meaning is unclear (what does it mean, by the way? That it's implemented in pure Python, without any C extensions?) and because it only helps identify the tool if the reader happens to know that Dask is "native" (which seems like it's pretty unimportant to an end user?). – Mark Amery Jul 1 at 18:53
  • @smci "We shouldn't just paste marketing claims" - well, sure. If it's not true, don't write it, or caveat it to make it true (which I tried to do with the word "partial" in my proposal). But I'd avoid diving into detail on the merits of a tool in the excerpt in a way that doesn't help the reader identify the tool. – Mark Amery Jul 1 at 18:56
  • Also, ultimately, re: all of the above - I'm not going to mess with the tag, since it's not a technology I know about, so if you think any of my suggestions are misguided, we can agree to disagree and I'll defer to you. Ultimately, everything here is just advice - coming from someone with no expertise in the particular tool at stake - that you are welcome to do what you like with (including copying it verbatim, building on or cannibalising it, or ignoring it entirely). – Mark Amery Jul 1 at 18:58
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    ^^ "But I'd avoid diving into detail on the merits of a tool in the excerpt in a way that doesn't help the reader identify the tool." But they do help the user. Lots of packages in Python claim to be parallel, but that can mean various degrees of awfulness, brokenness and non-determinism - try wrestling with scikit_learn if you want to see. "Scalable" is a very meaningful word claiming both "scales across number of threads and number of cores" (CPU) and "scales across physical memory limits" (memory/disk). You can measure the throughput of libraryX vs library Y doing the same benchmark – smci Jul 1 at 19:03

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