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I have been around Stack Exchange a ton in the last 10 years (about 150k total network reputation). About a year ago I switched to exclusively consuming content and logged out of all my accounts.

Through the last year of this, there are a few things I have noticed which are problematic to me as a now-just-reader of Stack Overflow.

  1. The signal/noise ratio for common languages (JavaScript, Java, and Python) is not that great at this point. There are many cases where the first Google result basically is useless information without a fair bit of reading through multiple answers, comments, etc.
    • It's still better than forums, but that gap is not as significant as it once was
  2. Finding results from 9+ years ago... and then having to scroll down through answers to see who updated it based on a decade of changes. Why isn't this problem solved yet?
  3. If you log out, the percentage of most Stack Overflow pages filled with ads/non-relevant content for the actual value proposition to me (technical information) is... well. It's bad.
  4. It's really annoying when a question title matches what I want to do perfectly, but the body/answers are different.
    • This is also pretty common, especially with XY problems. It's really frustrating to see a question "how do I do foo?" in Google results only to see answers saying "don't do foo, do bar instead"

I don't know really how to resolve these issues. Most of them have been discussed to death on MSO without much change for the majority of the time I've been here.

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    I've run into 4 more than I'd like, mostly because the question title is too generic for the question body, but it's impossible to solve it due to the sheer number of questions on SO. – user247702 Jun 26 at 15:32
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    Have an upvote just for #3 alone. The UX for new users is atrocious! – deceze Jun 26 at 15:35
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    for point 2, sort answers based on activity rather than votes, and you'll get the most recently updated answers. So that problem actually is already solved. – Davis Broda Jun 26 at 15:40
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    'Most of them have been discussed to death on MSO without much change for the majority of the time I've been here.' - From what I've seen, posts like this tend to get ignored when it comes to official responses, though, I might be wrong here. Though when they are ignored, you get a bunch of answers from users (not from employees) which seem to provide solutions and then everything will go quiet again for a couple of months until the whole process starts again when people realise that nothing has been done. – Script47 Jun 26 at 16:22
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    @Stijn One solution would be to edit the question title to be about what the question is actually asking about (versus something completely generic), but depending on the question, you may get pushback from other users on that. – R.M. Jun 26 at 17:07
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    @Stijn number four is a symptom of years of Stack Overflow (as a company) prioritizing the needs of question askers over future readers. – enderland Jun 26 at 17:42
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    I always hated 4, and now I'm guilty of it. Sometimes it's the best way to answer. But sometimes there are reasons why a person just needs to do what they're trying to do. On the other hand, just because one person says not to do it, that doesn't mean someone else can't answer and say how to do it. Either could be a good answer. If the answer says don't do it and it has lots of upvotes, seriously consider not doing it. – Scott Hannen Jun 26 at 18:37
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    @ScottHannen it depends though. If I ask, "how do I do X?" and then list a bunch of reasons why I should do Y instead, that's one thing. But if I am explicitly searching Google for "how do I do X" I very likely have an entirely different set of constraints than the OP does. In those cases, it's maddening to find a whole bunch of answers saying "don't use X." – enderland Jun 26 at 18:47
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    Google is far better than tag searching in SO. Those who find duplicates must have the links in their heads or work with own lists – Pauli Sudarshan Terho Jun 26 at 20:39
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    Many upvotes is more of a phenoma than something I can consider of having truthness... I often see a better answer below the most voted answer. Voters act from feelings and not logic. Maybe also speed in answering hint that SO is adjusted more after quantity that burn us out. I get not mush for reflecting and editing my questions to get them better. – Pauli Sudarshan Terho Jun 26 at 20:46
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    If you log out, the percentage of most Stack Overflow pages filled with ads/non-relevant content SO once said "plz send teh $$$$" and then it was filled with ads :( SO appears to do what they do just for money and they don't mind about members/users like you. – double-beep Jun 27 at 9:29
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    "It's really frustrating to see a question 'how do I do foo?' in Google results only to see answers saying 'don't do foo, do bar instead'." I would suggest to you that if you have not come to the point where you appreciate these responses, then you have a great deal of learning left to do. These answers are typically given when something flies in the face of normal and secure practices. Asking how to do it is typically an indication you're on track to create a headache for yourself or someone else. Instead of degrading such advice, change your attitude toward how you write code. – jpmc26 Jun 28 at 8:38
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    Although I appreciate hearing about your experience, and I agree with a lot of what you're saying, this is four questions/opinions in one, which could have been separate posts. – Flimm Jun 28 at 8:43
  • Possible duplicate of I've asked an XY question. What should I do with it? – user10677470 Jun 28 at 17:37
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    @jpmc26: Most of the time, that's the case, but occasionally it's something like "how do I create a subclass" when the OP needed composition. Even if the OP is making a mistake, people googling the title might have a good reason. – user2357112 Jun 29 at 9:22
46

I must say that questions of type (4) are often very helpful to me because I got stuck in my XY problem and saw the real solution after reading an answer of this kind.

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    Entirely agree here. Many, many times the wrong tool or process is being used for the wrong job. Users should be aware of better alternatives, unless they specifically state why they wish to avoid specific, clearly better alternatives. – jpp Jun 27 at 8:11
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    I agree. I do think that all answers to XY problems should list both answers, though – how it should be done and how to do what the asker actually wanted to do. – Numeri says Reinstate Monica Jun 27 at 11:09
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    @numeri - unless the asker wanted help applying the wrong tech to a problem. – Henk Holterman Jun 27 at 11:41
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    Yes, sometimes that is true. But sometimes you can waste a great deal of time answering why a certain approach is invalid to people fixated on "their" idea of a solution. I asked a question some time back and to avoid this happening I pointed out in the post that 'solution x' was not appropriate. The first response I got was someone asking me to justify why that solution was not appropriate. Rather frustrating. – Lee Melbourne Jun 27 at 11:42
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    @LeeMelbourne To a question like "How can I open this door which has an handle, without using the handle?" Asking you for clarifications about why you can't use the handle seems rather correct to me. We're not gonna tell anyone to take a hammer and destroy the walls when they just didn't realized they had to insert the key at the same time they push the handle. – Kaiido Jun 27 at 11:55
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    The situation was more like "How can I send data to an application on a device behind a NAT, when port forwarding is not an option." (How many Alexa devices would be sold if the home owner needed to configure port forwarding on their home router to get it to work?). Answer, in the end I used a server as a middleman and web socket channels. Arguing about why router configuration is not an option is frustrating. – Lee Melbourne Jun 27 at 12:21
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    If I am searching Google for "how do I write a for loop?" and then a top result is telling someone they don't need to write a for loop and to do something else instead, it's annoying. Or any other variant of this. The benefits of the XY problem primarily come if your also in an XY problem. But if you aren't, it's frustrating. – enderland Jun 27 at 14:17
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    @enderland from my point of view, most people coming here with such an "how do I do X" which gets an answer "Don't, instead solve the Y" actually need the "Y". Of course I got no numbers, but for instance 99% of people typing "How to trigger a mousemove event" will receive help by seeing "Don't, simply call the callback directly.". Sure there will still be the 1% of people that really need this odd request, but I believe we're here to help the majority. – Kaiido Jun 27 at 14:24
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    @Kaiido I agree XY problems are common for question askers who post on SO initially. But the problem is that almost all readers of Stack Overflow are not the question asker but people finding information via search results. – enderland Jun 27 at 14:29
  • @enderland Not sure to follow you here. I'm not myself a prolific question poster but I do consider myself a huge question asker, with tenth of different pages lurked in search of some or other information every single day. And yes, my questions are just the same ones that someone else already asked (with <s>3</s> 1 exception<s>s</s>). I do believe that SO-users, that is all the anonymous readers, are all askers, and that if they don't post their questions, it's because they did close it as dupe beforehand. And that's where our job as community members is a success. – Kaiido Jun 27 at 14:35
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    But @enderland I should note that I actually agree entirely with all your points, apart this sub-bullet on X-Y problems. For the 4, I find myself more often confronted to unanswered questions, or with very poor answers, that I have to dig through all the list of site:stackoverflow results to get what I wanted. Seeing bad answers is even more frustrating to me than seeing someone getting the good response for their wrong question. – Kaiido Jun 27 at 14:47
  • @enderland: Your making a difference between searching on Google or on SO is entirely in your imagination. In fact SO askers are strongly encouraged to search on Google first. And if advice that may be useful for others but not for you does 'annoy' you, you are the problem. ((All other points: full ack!)) – TaW Jun 28 at 8:09
  • Shouldn't this be a comment? – TGO Jun 28 at 17:21
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    @TaW I frequently find answers to questions on Stack Overflow via google that proceed to not answer the question and instead answer a question that they think the asker should have asked. The only thing more frustrating than that is arriving at a question via google only to find no answers and a comment saying "you should google it". – user4639281 Jun 28 at 23:07
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    @enderland Don't blame the answerers for giving a good answer. Blame the asker for giving the question bad search terms. – jpmc26 Jun 29 at 10:06
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Finding results from 9+ years ago... and then having to scroll down through answers to see who updated it based on a decade of changes. Why isn't this problem solved yet?

OK, I have some good news for you. In a recent answer, Tim dropped a hint for a new feature that nominates "canonical answers":

It's going to be complicated, this business of nominating canonicals and making sure they get enough attention to stay up to date, and fixing the sort order issue exacerbating bad info is going to be bumpy too, but it's gonna be worth it in the long term (I keep telling myself that as I pound my head on my desk coming up with a rough scheme to accomplish both to talk about)

The biggest complication with this feature is preventing its abuse.

Requiring enough people to vote on something so a small cabal organized in chat can't run rampant with it, while keeping it accessible enough to be useful in niche tags (COBOL, I'm looking at you). Might have finally found that use for silver tag badges.

Perhaps we on meta should push for a dialogue on this—as our community matures, stale content is getting to be more and more prevalent, and we need to think of more innovative ways of getting the content that matters to the people who need it.

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    ...you mean add another piece of dialog to the existing body of dialog about this issue? – Makoto Jun 26 at 21:46
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    @Makoto Yes, but this time the discussion would have some direction, and at least we know we'd be on the same page as SE :) Just hope I'm not being too naive for expecting this to turn into something useful eventually. – cs95 Jun 26 at 21:48
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    I'd better not feed you with any more comments then. I'm incredibly pessimistic these days. – Makoto Jun 26 at 21:49
  • With posts that are a decade old, you could reverse the answers by sorting by date so that the newer answers are near the top and older answers near bottom. As an option long posts, could have sort by upvotes as well. – Stan S. Jun 28 at 18:36
6

The signal/noise ratio for common languages (JavaScript, Java, and Python) is not that great at this point. There are many cases where the first Google result basically is useless information without a fair bit of reading through multiple answers, comments, etc. It's still better than forums, but that gap is not as significant as it once was

My impression is that Google presents highly popular questions first and they usually have good quality. I usually look at 2-3 different questions listed on the first page of the Google results and either there is a helpful answer or there is no helpful answer here or elsewhere with a high probability. Google is quite good at finding duplicate questions though (which are often not marked as duplicates here). Maybe one could try to quantify that effect a bit more.

Finding results from 9+ years ago... and then having to scroll down through answers to see who updated it based on a decade of changes. Why isn't this problem solved yet?

Good question. You could weight votes by their age, for example by shrinking existing scores year over year by a certain factor and newer answers would arrive on top more easily. With the right tweaks this may be solvable.

If you log out, the percentage of most Stack Overflow pages filled with ads/non-relevant content for the actual value proposition to me (technical information) is... well. It's bad.

Ads reduce the value of the content, they distract from it and take away valuable space. The owners of the Stack Exchange network presumably want to maximize their financial return. For them there exist an optimal ratio of ads and content (the point where users are not yet running away probably). For you and other users there are ad-blockers extendable with custom-rules. Why not using them?

It's really annoying when a question title matches what I want to do perfectly, but the body/answers are different. This is also pretty common, especially with XY problems. It's really frustrating to see a question "how do I do foo?" in Google results only to see answers saying "don't do foo, do bar instead"

I usually check multiple search results in the hope that one of them solves my problem. I cannot remember this particular problem ("XY done wrong"?) much. Maybe one could try to quantify it a bit more.

  • Reducing votes just due to age isn't practical if content is still relevant and best practices haven't changed regarding it – charlietfl Jul 24 at 0:30
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    @charlietfl There are advantages and disadvantages. If the content is still relevant it will get new votes and it will stay on top. If the content is not relevant anymore, then aging of the votes is the right choice. Some situations will be improved, others not. What I would already be happy with would be a sorting order by age weighted votes, so that answers with lots of recent upvotes come more often to the top. No reduction of votes necessary for that. – Trilarion Jul 24 at 21:16
4

Just addressing point #2:

Finding results from 9+ years ago... and then having to scroll down through answers to see who updated it based on a decade of changes. Why isn't this problem solved yet?

The superficial problem is that users aren't supposed to make edits that change an answer significantly unless it's community wiki, even if it's now wrong. If I'm mistaken here, I'd love to be informed/corrected.

But then who should maintain stuff? Are we suggesting that Jon Skeet (as an example) should go through hundreds of decade-old questions and answers looking to see if he should open it up to more broad editing from the community? Who has the time for that? And what do you do if the original answerer or asker isn't active anymore? Most/many of the top posts on SO are pretty dang old, and a lot of the involved parties are either far less active or gone entirely.

However, this policy of not significantly changing an answer is grounded in solid principles... it's wrong to attach somebody's name to work which they haven't vouched for and it's wrong to forcibly remove their name from work that they have done. Also, what if the person editing the answer has either worse writing or worse understanding of the issue and makes the answer incorrect or misleading? These are things worth preventing.

I would love to see a feature that allowed users to suggest "significant" changes to answers that could either then be accepted by the original answerer or by the community. Perhaps this would only be an option for questions which haven't been edited by their original author in 3+ years and/or the review process is more stringent. I personally would love this since I don't find many ways to meaningfully contribute on SO, but I regularly see situations where I think I could improve an existing answer by editing in some highly-upvoted comments, indicating some new API requirement, etc. At the very least, it would allow us to try and find a middle ground of respecting people's contributions while keeping things as up-to-date as possible.

  • In some cases it helps to add a comment, asking for an answer to be updated (and wait a few days). Include all the information that may help the answerer. – Peter Mortensen Jul 12 at 11:48
  • As an FYI - if you do edit an answer, the author gets notified. Have seen some of my old answers get updated due to api changes or better modern practices and has never bother me...and doubt it would bother most. Simple enough to add note and date in edit – charlietfl Jul 24 at 0:23
  • @charlietfl My edits go to review, where they can be rejected because "This edit deviates from the original intent of the post". Although some, you included, think that some modernization is still within the "original intent of the post", it may still be difficult for reviewers to see this, especially if I'm pulling in information from comments (sometimes on another answer.) – Jeutnarg Jul 24 at 15:01
2

Just a simple though on number #4, since no other answer seems to tackle this.

You say

It's really annoying when a question title matches what I want to do perfectly, but the body/answers are different.

Sadly, this is a problem every site in the network seems to share, with different solutions and different approaches. In my humble opinion, Stack Overflow one is one of the worst ones. Let me explain what I mean.

As you already said, often the issue is called "XY problem". Some other sites prefer to call it "Frame challenge" instead, but in the end the core of the issue is the same: someone post a question, asking "how to do X". Then, readers recognize that for some reasons, the asker doesn't actually need to do X, but should do Y instead. Reasons can be many: maybe it is not advisable to do X, maybe X uses a now deprecated ans insecure technology, maybe X doesn't even solve the problem.... maybe.
The important point here is that the alternative proposed solution Y does solve the asker problem and it is preferable to X.

The problem is that our system basically allows people to "make up" XY problems that never existed in the first place. So, even if it is clear that the asker can't do Y because the requirements of his scenario don't allow that option, someone will "kindly" suggests that he does Y because that is obviously the right way. No matter how "impossible" doing Y is for him, the asker can't really do anything to avoid that reply.

I know, I know, maybe some of you are thinking that he shouldn't care, that the reply "could still be useful to other users that don't have the same limitations". Yep, that's true.. but I find that a tad strange... and noisy. What I don't find strange is that at this point the user that needed to do X and was told to do Y even if he clearly stated that's not an option for him will probably feel pretty deluded with the help he got on our site. Yep, he could try and downvote the answer... and pay with his rep for what to him seem just an abuse of someone that "is just hijacking his question to get some free votes". Obviously, that is if he has rep to spend on downvotes in the first place.
He could flag the answer as Not an answer... ops, no, wait... I just remember that it is fine to give an orange to someone that asked for a book, and such answers can't be moderated by the mods but their downranking should instead be payed with other user rep points.
So, it is just stuck with a question that now seems to have one answer... that doesn't help him. All the answer does for him is adding noise... and discourage other readers of the question list from clicking on his question to check if they could post an answer since "it already got an answer, no rep to gain, move on".

Obviously the above is just a sort of hyperbole, taking the issue to extreme conclusions. What is important though, is that is indeed discouraging for people, especially new users, to get told that they should do X because "only bad programmers still do Y" after they explained -is some cases multiple times- that they are stuck with Y for whatever reason they may have.

  • This is actually more or less why I stopped asking questions on Stack Overflow, most of my questions started to become more difficult because of constraints and after a number of questions in a row got answers which blatantly ignored things that were in the question to be "helpful." – enderland Jul 19 at 20:53
  • Oh, trust me @enderland - I know how you feel. I once posted a self answered question that explains why two apparently equivalents methods of setting a SharePoint list item ID produces different results (one does correctly raise an exception since setting the ID shouldn't be allowed, the other bypasses the check) and got aother answer explaining why setting the id is a bad practice... I already knew that, I was just trying to share documentation on a SharePoint api bug. – Hitodama Jul 22 at 11:16
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I upvoted your question. You raise some valid points.

Stack Overflow certainly has changed. It is more oriented on making profit and that has affected the user experience. There's been a lot of focus on creating revenue and a neglect of the main Q&A site. This has been discussed ad nauseam.

I'm hoping (I've said this a lot) that they're focusing more on our site.

Many people do not adapt well to change and the site is changing. Some is good, some is not good. Ads on the internet annoy the stuffing out of me. I always use an ad blocker. On one developer survey there was a heavy focus on ads. I said in the survey - "you better not disallow ad blockers" - as it was clear they were ramping up for more advertising.

So the new user experience, without ad blockers, is clearly different from the registered and rep bound users (is it 200 rep we need to start not seeing ads?). So simply this aspect of your issues is easily solved by ... erm Logging in.

The whole notion of having people register and earning moderation privileges with reputation is to curate the site. A kind of ironic point at this stage of the site's development. To have a community run site, that is now heavily mandated by the business. (*)

For the parts of your question that are solvable by the community I agree with this answer. So without repeating these points I'll add to them.

Flag Flag Flag

You mention in the comments:

The entire value proposition of SO is not having to sift through information. However I find myself regularly having to sift through comments (which don't show up in activity anyways) and random answers to find meaningful answers to questions. I can sort all by "active" but nearly all questions have newer crappy spammy answers on them that aren't useful. Or "good try" answers that are technically answers to SO prevents people from deleting them. This is especially prolific for popular questions. – enderland

I have been a great advocate of the transient nature of comments and cleaning them up. Flag to have comments or comment threads cleaned up. Moderators are happy to vacuum these up from the site. It's very easy to do.

We have some users who faithfully curate their tags and flag repetitive answers. They go through long threaded posts and carefully flag answers for deletion and why. This is time consuming, for the flagger and the moderators, but that's our job and we're happy to support people in the community striving to improve the site. It's this type of dedicated user (the flagger) and the content contributors that are the backbone of the site.

Comprehensive custom moderator flags help most problems on the site. Meta posts are not always required. We have an incredibly strong moderator team and are on top of the flag queue all the time these days. It's reasonable to say to people. Bring on the custom flags if you want to seriously curate the site. Be reasonable. Be clear.

Whilst it doesn't solve every concern, it certainly does aid in making quality content more readily available.


(*) although there's things I do not like about the site, I respect the employees. Much (most, if not all) of it is out of their hands. I strongly urge people to be respectful of the employees, as they have their heads on a chopping block coming here delivering, often, unpopular messages. The site is now very much a business and it's something we need to accept. We don't have to like it.

I’m not for a moment saying people have to stay. I’m saying it’s clearly out of our control the direction the site is going.

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    @Yvette re your point on custom flags: are you saying that a well written custom flag on subjectively "bad" answer, especially an upvoted one, has a chance of causing the A to be deleted? If you are I'll do more of it (FWIW to date I DV, vote to delete if I can, grumble and move on - I sometimes even take the risk of commenting) – chris neilsen Jun 26 at 20:44
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    The goal there is to make it not subjective, @chrisneilsen - "this is a bad answer" relies on the moderator being able to figure out why something is - & then agreeing with it. "This answer contains a shell script that wipes the harddrive of anyone unfortunate enough to run it - it has nothing to do with PDF generation" - is much less open to interpretation... – Shog9 Jun 26 at 20:55
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    @shog thanks, that's what I always thought (mods aren't expected to be SME's) I'll stick to DV'g etc except in the most egregious cases – chris neilsen Jun 26 at 21:58
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    I don't think casting more flags,downvotes, and closevotes are going to help the situation. All of those actions are routinely looked down upon by the growing majority. We're (figuratively) getting beat up for doing the very thing we we're supposed to be doing. Saying keep on doing what we're doing doesn't seem like a good option to me. – Kevin B Jun 26 at 22:31
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    @Yvette a)yes it is. Thats why their input is valuable. They know better than the average bear, so they can see where the problem is compared to where we aim to be. Anyway at that level of rep, aren't they a 'trusted user'? Don't wanna sound defeatist but I kinda don't see it here... B)again, why does it matter?? The problems pointed out are problems. For many reasons, people can stop/slow down moderation and curation efforts. Judging their contributions isn't productive in anyway and detracts from the topics they are trying to fix. – Patrice Jun 26 at 23:23
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    @YvetteColomb "this is a long time user making a complaint not a new user." yet this is exactly a complaint a new user or non-registered would do and should do. The only reason they don't is because they are a new user or a non-registered user. I have been there when somebody who doesn't have a SO account is trying to find an answer and they hit exactly what OP described. Yet, without an account, they can't do anything about it. They don't even know they are supposed to do anything about it. To top it off, even if they did get an account - they still don't have the rep to act. – VLAZ Jun 27 at 4:57
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    Folks, please keep the comments here civil. It's perfectly okay to discuss and disagree, but shouting and sniping at each other is not only pointless, it's a violation of our community standards. – Cody Gray Jun 27 at 6:32
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    Some downvotes may be due to the last sentence. I think a lot of people are unhappy about the direction the site is being steered in by its bosses. Have an upvote from me anyway! – user1725145 Jun 28 at 8:12
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    I'm sorry if I offended the OP. That was not my intention. – Yvette Colomb Jun 29 at 1:00
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    Re "There's been a lot of focus on creating revenue": Yes, they want a ten times higher revenue / valuation before the IPO - from 70 million USD to 700 million USD (hence the change of CEO). – Peter Mortensen Jul 12 at 11:54
-15

I'm not sure the solution to some of these things can't directly be resolved with technology, and may not be in the domain of SO as a company.

Finding results from 9+ years ago... and then having to scroll down through answers to see who updated it based on a decade of changes. Why isn't this problem solved yet?

You can use the "Active" sorting features on answers to see answers with the latest activity. Beyond that this is not something SO really can do much about, but moderators and curators can. Bring up the specific question, maybe we need to restrict new answers, maybe we need to cull other answers, or maybe we need to create a community wiki out of the question or maybe a new question entirely needs to be made for the new version of what ever software you are using. Bring this up on meta, this is something we currently have the tools to deal with.

It's really annoying when a question title matches what I want to do perfectly but the body/answers are different.

This is also not something the SO company can do much about, this is a people problem.

  • If the topvoted answer accepted answer is correct, and you should never have used X, then that's on you, and you shouldn't be using it, don't make a new question.

  • If the topvoted accepted answer doesn't apply to you, and you really need to use X, then make a new question because that old question didn't address your situation. Make sure to state why this other question wasn't a duplicate. You may also want to consider editing the other questions title if it really is exactly your situation, but not theirs, possibly bring it up on meta.

  • If the topvoted answer doesn't really apply to anyone, and is wrong, but OP accepted it anyway, then it should probably be discussed on meta, and a new title needs to be discussed for the question, because OP clearly wasn't looking for X, but a way to solve Z. Then you may make a new question similar to the previous situation.

Unfortunately fixing these two issues requires you not to be a "read only" user, not every curator can look at every question, and you can't really make a tool that automatically detects these kinds of situations, they are sort of subjective. More tooling isn't going to help in these circumstances. It's up to you to bring these issues in a well defined specific manner to the people who can fix them.

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    I don't need to argue with you about my experience over the past year. You can tell me "you are using the site wrong" - that's your opinion. My opinion is sifting through answers/comments on old questions to find relevant content is cumbersome. My opinion reflects my experience, as an established and experienced SE user trying to use Stack Overflow exclusively for information in that timeframe. Your response here is pretty naive, too - you really expect every question fitting those criteria to get a dedicated meta discussion about it? Or to be reasked? – enderland Jun 26 at 17:37
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    The entire value proposition of SO is not having to sift through information. However I find myself regularly having to sift through comments (which don't show up in activity anyways) and random answers to find meaningful answers to questions. I can sort all by "active" but nearly all questions have newer crappy spammy answers on them that aren't useful. Or "good try" answers that are technically answers to SO prevents people from deleting them. This is especially prolific for popular questions. – enderland Jun 26 at 18:44
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    Ok? So because there's a broken suggested solution it invalidates my experience? Look, 99% of the content I view on Stack Overflow is the result of the content matching a search I put into Google. If Stack Overflow wants me to sort answers in order to use their tool, which has the entire point to sort answers so good answers get voted up... ok then. You seem more intent on being pedantic than actually caring about the points I raised though so I am not sure what the purpose of me even responding here is. – enderland Jun 26 at 19:28
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    And calling this a people problem and not a platform problem is ignorant of the nearly decade of people asking for better curation tooling on this very meta site. – enderland Jun 26 at 19:31
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    @opa I have a degree in HCI (which is basically UX). Understanding how customers use your product matters and the workflow matters, or you build crap tools/workflows. As a tangible example, what is the default sort option if you click a SO link from Google? Do this daily for a few months. This entire answer acts implies that is is my responsibility as someone browsing Google to figure out how to read a thread of results, when the entire purpose of SO is (was?) to eliminate this problem. All of your suggestions in the post itself are similarly shortsighted, ignoring years of history. – enderland Jun 26 at 19:43

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