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Usage guidance:

Many files are involved in the operation.

Tag description:

Use this tag when many files are involved, especially if their number is unbounded.

  1. Does it describe the contents of the questions to which it is applied? and is it unambiguous?

    I guess it gives some description, but it's not unambiguous.

  2. Is the concept described even on-topic for the site?

    Well, programmers work with files and sometimes more than one, so I guess so.

  3. Does the tag add any meaningful information to the post?

    Not really. It's very vague.

  4. Does it mean the same thing in all common contexts?

    Well, it always means dealing with at least two files. Should we also have a tag for programs involving at least two variables?

Here are a couple of very different cases where the tag would be applicable:

  1. A Makefile that handles a project with many source files.

  2. Scripting involving wildcards. For instance rm *.tmp

  3. "Real programs" using multiple configuration or input files

  4. Since "file" can mean "stream" it can involve programs reading from standard input and writing to standard output. Or piping in general.

  5. Uploading and downloading multiple files.

  6. A bit far fetched, but in Unix, almost everything (hard drives, partitions, nics, memory etc) is a file.

Also, I cannot see how a question could have this as the only tag. Therefore, I consider it a meta tag.

  • 46 questions tagged both [multiple-files] and [file-upload]. That is probably the most appropriate use of the tag. – user4639281 Jun 25 at 17:34
  • From the creators of [mutiple-files], we bring you two new performers: multifile-uploader and multipartform-data – Braiam Jun 25 at 18:06
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    Disclaimer: If you don't know what the command in the title does, do not try to find out by running it from your terminal. – pault Jun 25 at 18:15
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    @Machavity Even more devious: rm -rf /* gets rid of [multiple-files] – JL2210 Jun 25 at 18:31
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    @JL2210 It's not a game for cowards... – Machavity Jun 25 at 18:33
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    @pault If you go around putting every CLI statement you see into your server just to find out what it does you've got bigger problems... – Machavity Jun 25 at 18:42
  • @pault: since I'm on Windows, I... did the correct thing and just typed rm without the arguments, and sure enough, rm reported back rm: missing operand, since of course I have a port of the file utils installed (didn't remember). And now I'm too cowardly to test if the whole command will "run correctly" on Windows, so no smug "this just said it wouldn't run" from me. – Jeroen Mostert Jun 26 at 15:46
  • @Machavity I consider it a right of passage to accidentally delete everything off your computer at least once while learning how to use the command line. – Edeki Okoh Jun 26 at 17:41
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    I'd laugh but I did manage to nuke /bin off a shiny new VPS once when I was trying to migrate all my crap to it. Try recovering from that one. Sigh. – Lightness Races with Monica Jun 26 at 23:41
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit I once did mount --bind bin /bin while attempting to create a chroot sandbox. Fun times, I tell ya. At least I could recover from that by restarting. Still, that taught me the difference between multiple-files and multiple-IMPORTANT-files. – DarkWiiPlayer Jun 27 at 7:46
  • @DarkWiiPlayer Are you suggesting a new tag? :D – klutt Jun 27 at 7:47
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    @klutt Possibly. Maybe the multiple- part can be removed so it's just important-files, or dont-delet-dis-files or maybe how-to-brick-your-os-files. This tag would mark posts where you should read the description before you copy random snippets into your terminal in hopes of understanding the question without actually reading it. – DarkWiiPlayer Jun 27 at 7:56
  • @Machavity Ha! glad some people know CommitStrip, I like this comic – Kaddath Jun 28 at 12:49
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    @Machavity Nice comic, but they forgot the --no-preserve-root parameter ;) – klutt Jun 28 at 12:51
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This is a clear-cut Meta tag. "Multiple files are involved in the operation" is not describing a topic.

In terms of point #2, I don't see that this is identifying anything unique to programming. After all, non-programmers work with multiple files all the time too.

I say that we get rid of this useless tag.

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The only thing that gave me a second of pause was:

especially if their number is unbounded.

But, we have tags for all of that (recursive, depth first, breadth first, etc), it's just that folks most inclined to use this tag are asking because they might not be familiar with those terms.

The UI was really funny in this particular case, so I'm including a screenshot of it:

screenshot saying "are you damn sure about destroying multiple-files?"

  • Nice how the moderator UI doesn't have any sense of professionalism. – JL2210 Sep 2 at 1:21

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