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I recently came across this question, which is now rather incomprehensible as it references two images which are not present in the text. However, it was evidently an interesting question and attracted a useful answer.

The images were deleted by the original creator and can be seen in the edit history.

Should I restore the deleted images? I feel that there are likely to be moral and copyright implications, as obviously the original author feels strongly enough that they do not want these images online to delete them after getting an answer.

Perhaps a better solution would be to edit the question to better encapsulate what the images meant? Or perhaps even to make some replacement images. But this risks still being hard to understand and also is a large investment in time.

Should the question be closed or deleted instead?

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    you roll it back.... if the OP has concerns, they can remove their question, or they can do an image that's not copyrighted, and then ask for a mod to remove the image from the history. At least that's my opinion here... (and kinda what I did... since the edit invalidated answers IMHO, which is bad) – Patrice Jun 20 at 21:08
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    If you're talking about deleted as in removed, you can roll back. If you mean deleted as in 3rd party host that died or removed the images, and it can't be recovered through the archive, and the images are required for the question to make sense, vote to close. Otherwise, remove the links. – Zoe Jun 20 at 21:10
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Should I restore the deleted images?

When you see someone vandalizing their own post technically it's okay to restore it for the first time, and only refrain from action and involve a moderator (via a custom flag) if they re-apply the vandalism, but I often play it safe and just flag a moderator when I see vandalism because in my experience the rate of re-applying it is just so high it's not worth it.

I feel that there are likely to be moral and copyright implications

If the content was posted to the site by someone without proper authority to apply the CC license, they can submit a DMCA takedown notice. That's the process for copyright violations. You don't need to worry about them. If there was a proper takedown notice, the offending content wouldn't even be in the revision history anymore (or the question would be deleted, or some other mechanism by which you would be unable to restore the content). There would also probably be a mod comment, ore revision note, or something to indicate a DMCA request was involved. Since it is restorable, we know that didn't happen here.

Perhaps a better solution would be to edit the question to better encapsulate what the images meant?

You're certainly welcome to do this, if you feel you're capable of editing a question to not include information the author apparently no longer wants included, but while still ensuring that the question is not meaningfully different from what it was with that information. Using new, made up, test data that has the same relevant properties is fine if you are actually able to ensure the new test data meets the criteria of the original question, and is at least as clear, etc.

But this risks still being hard to understand and also is a large investment in time.

Yes, which is why it tends to not happen often, and it happens successfully even less often. Usually it's only the author who's sufficiently motivated to take the time to do this, if they really want that content off of the site, but don't have legal grounds to take it down. But if you want to help them, you are certainly welcome to.

Should the question be closed or deleted instead?

Only if the question isn't useful even with the restored content (or without the content if a successful DMCA takedown happens), which doesn't appear to be the case here (I say as someone without subject matter expertise, and just judging off of votes).

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    One nit: moderators are never involved in DCMA takedowns. Those are handled exclusively by staff of Stack Overflow. However, from a regular user’s perspective, staff look just like moderators since both carry a diamond after their names. – Cody Gray Jun 21 at 4:12

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