-54

I very often see posts on various other forums regarding how StackOverflow has become a somewhat unfriendly and judgmental space to participate. This had me wondering how we can encourage users to showcase a more positive set of behaviors. This would likely encourage new members to use the site while also further engaging current users.

A system that rewards 5 reputation per month to each user who has 20 or more upvotes within that month seems likely to achieve both of these goals. The reputation award would be small enough so that it would not allow users to gain large amounts of reputation by randomly upvoting posts and large enough to still feel rewarded. By doing this, we can increase the amount of upvotes on the site in general and have people be less likely to be shunned away from the community. This would also encourage current members to interact with the site more.

A system such as that listed above could largely impact how pleasantly the community is acting toward one another and could go a long way toward reversing the not-so-beginner-friendly reputation that is beginning to develop.

  • 19
    There are already plenty of upvotes. The lack of upvotes is not a problem the site has. And that is not the behaviour you want to encourage blindly, – yivi Jun 20 at 18:15
  • 2
    By setting expectations earlier and more effectively. – Kevin B Jun 20 at 18:23
  • 3
    so wait... if you get enough upvotes, that give you rep..... we give more rep? how does that incentivize anything? Or you mean if YOU upvote enough }? don't you see the risk in people upvoting bad stuff just for a +5? – Patrice Jun 20 at 18:41
  • 1
    @Patrice Yes, the idea was that if you upvote enough, you get +5 rep. I briefly addressed the concern of random upvotes for +5 rep on the post. A full year of doing so would result in a meager +60 reputation which doesnt sound worth the effort. It sounds like people are largely against the rep gain idea but I'm still wondering if a similar concepted implemented with badges might be a good idea – GregH Jun 20 at 18:44
  • 9
    @GReg +60 to the upvoter, sure.... but + 200 a month of potentially undeserved rep to the upvoted posts..... Are you ok with a bad question getting 20 rep because someone wants that +5? – Patrice Jun 20 at 18:44
  • @Patrice I'm not sure you're understanding the original idea. If a user upvotes other users posts 20 times or more within one month, they get +5 reputation total and never more than +5 reputation per month as part of this. That results in a maximum gain of +60 reputation per year. This whole post seems somewhat ironic to me as I'm new to meta and downvoted into oblivion on a well-intentioned DISCUSSION topic. Oh well though, not all ideas are good ideas – GregH Jun 20 at 18:45
  • 9
    @Greg I upvote 20 posts TODAY. I upvote bad posts. I get 5 rep. How many rep did I give to bad posts? I get your point. my point is people will upvote BAD content to get that +5, and that is terrible – Patrice Jun 20 at 18:46
  • 2
    As for the score on your post, you tagged your post feature request as well as discussion. Read the tag excerpt for feature request. You'll see..... people are downvoting you to say they disagree. it's about the suggestion. don't take it as anything against you... it's about the post and the suggestion. – Patrice Jun 20 at 18:50
  • 19
    I very often see posts on various other forums regarding how StackOverflow has become a somewhat unfriendly and judgmental space to participate. Oh, sorry I missed that, I was down voting and flagging some of the 8000 new posts that came in today on Stack Overflow. – rene Jun 20 at 18:55
  • 5
    Number of upvotes is steady as it goes. It can't be recent complaints. – rene Jun 20 at 18:58
  • 20
    If anything, I'd prefer to give rep to curators for performing needed curation. That includes downvoting bad posts and closing popular but off-topic questions. That, I think, is incentive to clean up the piles of junk we get. I just don't know how to implement it so that couldn't be gamed, or be massive overhead, though. – fbueckert Jun 20 at 19:12
  • 4
    Basically your suggestion is to encourage upvotes to posts that trigger "your site sucks because when I posted unresearched/off-topic question I was told that it is unresearched/off-topic" blog and twitter posts... but how would you even detect that all those upvotes go to such content (as it currently stands/desired most upvotes go to on-topic/well researched posts)? (I confused about proposal - so I'm voted/concerned about it being somewhat not-well-though-out) – Alexei Levenkov Jun 20 at 20:57
  • 2
    Good goal, not so good suggestion for achieving that goal (as numerous people have pointed out - I'd go with EJoshuaS's answer as the clearest). I'd encourage you to think about other avenues by which we might reward positive participation though... Maybe start by thinking about ways we could do more with badges, since that's precisely why they exist! – Shog9 Jun 21 at 2:36
  • Before trying to come up with a fix, you'd first need to define the problem more clearly. What is being seen as "somewhat unfriendly and judgemental" exactly? – deceze Jun 21 at 8:17
  • 1
    Some users get miffed when SO does not do their homework while they spend all weekend in the bar. Don't worry about the Tattler and Facepalm ranters with their sour grapes and entitled thuggery. Who needs 'em? – Martin James Jun 21 at 14:48
39

Maybe stop calling us "unfriendly" and we'll feel better about the whole thing.

Honestly though, giving people random reputation just because the system thinks they're being "positive" adds more logistics to the reputation system which doesn't have the same benefit or payout that we intend.

  • 10
    Dang, next you’ll be saying we shouldn’t hand out trophies to all the kids just for showing up to competitions! What kind of unfriendly world do you want to create here?! – Cody Gray Jun 21 at 4:15
  • Why would you even hand trophies to kids who just show up to competitions and not win it? – Shinjo Jun 21 at 4:26
  • @Shinjo because that's modern parenting. Reward everything. And then you get people who get emotionally devastated because a question received downvotes for doing less than the bare minimum. – Gimby Jun 21 at 8:31
  • 1
    Unless it was a cultural difference, AFAIK kids were usually rewarded with a certificate of participation. Also back to the topic in regard to SO unfriendly terms, I actually appreciate the folks who downvoted or closed the question for specific reasons and explained why after I clarify why I thought it's not the case. As long as it was done in a civil manner, no one should be hurt in the process. – Shinjo Jun 21 at 8:34
  • 3
    @Shinjo That gives me an idea, let's rebrand downvotes as Certificates of Participation! Hold on, going to make a feature request... – Davy M Jun 24 at 18:24
27

I very often see posts on various other forums regarding how StackOverflow has become a somewhat unfriendly and judgmental space to participate. This had me wondering how we can encourage users to showcase a more positive set of behaviors. This would likely encourage new members to use the site while also further engaging current users.

What needs to stop is that outsiders call me unfriendly. I'm not, nor are many other users around here. I'm fed up with having to argue with imaginary tweets, blogs, forums, whatever. We have a pretty good setup to do self-evaluation and self-healing, it is called Meta. Tell those outsiders to post here instead of being the delivery guy of their unfriendly message.

A system that rewards 5 reputation per month to each user who has 20 or more upvotes within that month seems likely to achieve both of these goals. The reputation award would be small enough so that it would not allow users to gain large amounts of reputation by randomly upvoting posts and large enough to still feel rewarded.

The Q/A model is crafted around content that gets valued by up and down votes from users. You earn reputation because you've added value and get recognized for that. There is not a single event that gives you reputation for free. And it is important that reputation isn't free. It needs lots of effort to post and maintain good quality content.

By doing this, we can increase the amount of upvotes on the site in general and have people be less likely to be shunned away from the community. This would also encourage current members to interact with the site more.

No, you're not increasing the amount of upvotes. You're increasing reputation, out of thin air. And upvoting is free. Once you gained 15 reputation you can upvote 40 times per day. And 15 reputation is reached after 7 accepted suggested edits. You don't even need to post anything. With giving rep for free you only makes users more lazy. Those that cared about rep will stop participating because it now comes for free. The gap between low rep and high rep (if that is important) will increase.

A system such as that listed above could largely impact how pleasantly the community is acting toward one another and could go a long way toward reversing the not-so-beginner-friendly reputation that is beginning to develop.

The community is pleasantly acting as proven by the many upvotes that are still cast, despite the incoming stream of bad posts per day. We are catering for beginners. Ask question wizards, Help center topics, FAQ posts, review queues, (auto) comments, external guidance sites and thousands of users that set out each day, week, month, year to try to make sense of any (serious) attempt of asking a question. I have the impression that not all of those that ask their first question on SO come prepared or are willing to accept that their question can't be answered. Some of them even refuse to invest a bit of time to handle feedback. Strangely enough they find the time to tweet, blog, forum, whatever adding to the installment of what started your meta post.

The gamification of SO is well balanced and has proven to be working to curate useful content for millions of visitors. We don't need reputation inflation as that will break that delicate balance.

  • 4
    It's funny how, longer and longer after the welcoming bandwagon, answers to these type of questions start more and more with "can we stop calling each other unfriendly?" in more unfriendly terms... People are pissed off... it's getting really aggravating, if I'm to be honest myself... – Patrice Jun 20 at 19:42
  • 10
    @Patrice that is true. I honestly don't mind if people here on meta call me unfriendly because I am. What is simply not productive is having to argue with individuals and their opinions that are not here. I rather have a fight with you, Servy, Hans or Makoto then with some anonymous user "discussing" an issue without any context. – rene Jun 20 at 19:47
  • 13
    sorry if your name is not in the list, I want to have a fight with you to but space is limited – rene Jun 20 at 19:49
  • 3
    @rene Yeah, but we can't argue back there. They're not looking for a constructive debate, they're looking for support that their feelings are validated, which they won't be here. It's happened since SO was created; it won't stop anytime soon. If they want a voice here, then invest some effort into understanding the system. Otherwise, it's going to be extremely hard to take them seriously. – fbueckert Jun 20 at 19:50
  • 1
    @rene this was intended to be more of a discussion and not "hey! lets give out tons of free rep!". there are other ways of implementing this that do not require free rep. A badge similar to the Electorate badge but for upvotes (maybe not gold tier to not overly encourage "bad" upvotes), a piece of flair on the username such as a profile hat and many other ideas im not thinking of. The somewhat aggressive response to a suggestion that has good intentions is pretty ironic. I don't think stackoverflow is an awful place but I do think it can improve. as most things usually can – GregH Jun 20 at 20:00
  • 4
    @GregH we all agree some things can improve. You've set the context for the start of a discussion about your suggestion. I responded to that. Yes, that context makes me angry / sad and lots of other things. It is ironic how pleasant I find this site and its inhabitants. – rene Jun 20 at 20:07
  • 1
    I don't think anyone thinks things are absolutely perfect, @GregH. But I don't think it's unreasonable to expect users to make an attempt to understand the system before wanting to change it. There's always more to learn, but starting from a false premise is an easy way to lose support for your idea. – fbueckert Jun 20 at 20:25
  • 5
    @gregh point me to an aggressive message sent to you.Where was anyone rude, aggressive, or angry towards you? People disagreed and said "I don't think this will help", while giving their reasons for it. Would there have been any way we could've disagreed with you that wouldn't have made you feel this way? Cause..... This seems like you got a pretty ok kind of response, to me..... (+ btw, as rene pointed out, your context is kinda insulting to a lot of the meta regulars) – Patrice Jun 20 at 20:29
  • @Patrice to be fair, my answer can be read as pretty aggressive. – rene Jun 20 at 20:40
  • 1
    My personal experience on stackoverflow has been really nothing but positive. The opening of my post was driven by what I've heard from very capable colleagues as well as seen on other forums. I realize I'm not providing any supporting evidence to that claim however that still remains my experience and I felt it needed to be said to provide motivation for the suggestion. Also, I'm not sure exactly how that can be found insulting and certainly wasn't my intention. Anyway, the point has been taken that the idea isnt well received – GregH Jun 20 at 20:42
  • @rene fair point, but the timing of the comments on the question make it clear that perception was before your answer though – Patrice Jun 20 at 20:42
  • 6
    @Greg there's a lot of context you don't have there unfortunately :/. Meta regulars have to fend off "you're unwelcoming" or "you're unfriendly" about once a day. All without evidence, all feeding off the same blogs that have been debated time and time again. People are tired, and meta regulars consider they do a LOT to help the site...... so being called "unfriendly" is.... abrasive, when you have to defend yourself often. It's not just on you, there's a lot of.... fatigue... around this too. It definitely doesn't feel like your intention.... but ppl are tired of this lol – Patrice Jun 20 at 20:45
  • 17
    @GregH I have cast 70,000 close votes, over 12,000 flags and 11,000 down votes. Those that complain about unfriendlyness tend to couple that with their posts being moderated. That is about me. And I take that serious and personal because I still care for this place. But I refuse to go wherever the wind blows as that will end us in the same state usenet, Yahoo Answers and many other forums ended. I can listen and respond to feedback here on MSO. Tell your capable colleagues to join the discussion here on MSO. We can use capable people to drive this thing towards to the future. – rene Jun 20 at 20:54
  • 6
    Thanks for the callout rene. <3 – Servy Jun 20 at 21:00
25

I don't think it's unfriendly or judgemental but, rather, people are coming to SO expecting to get things handed to them on a silver platter without so much as investing 30 seconds of their time to try and formulate a reasonable question, search for an answer to their question or trying to understand how SO works.

Day after day new posters demand code to solve their problem and those same people can't even describe their problem clearly enough for someone to even begin to guess what it is they want. I find that the level of tolerance around here has gotten enormous even as the quality of questions has steadily declined.

16

So numerous people have explained to you in depth why it's not a useful idea to just give people rep purely for upvoting posts, so I'm going to ignore the entire body of your question for a second and address purely the title:

How to encourage users to exhibit positive behavior?

There are hundreds, if not thousands, of decisions and intentional aspects of design in the site attempting to accomplish that. We allow users to upvote to encourage people to post useful questions and answers, we give people badges for a wide variety of behaviors that we want them to do, we make behaviors we want people to do easy and convenient, and things that they should probably be doing infrequently or with great care harder (there's a reason that the answer button is way more prominent than the comment button.

We let people close questions that don't meet the site's standards to encourage people to ask good questions. We allow users to flag content that's offensive, rude, spam, or otherwise requiring moderator attention so that the bad behavior can be dealt with and discouraged.

We give people rep for suggesting editing posts that meaningfully improve their quality. We ensure people are recognized for their contributions, both in questions, answers, and edits.

And the list goes on, from major features, down to names of things and wording (which often has quite a lot of thought go into it).

All of these systems that you think are "unfriendly" and "judgemental" all exist because they are there to encourage the positive behaviors that we want. Here, that mostly means contributing towards improving the site as repository of knowledge for all programmers to aid them in their practical professional programming problems (say that three times fast).

Places that don't have those kinds of systems, and that encourage people to do whatever they want, tend to create places where people don't like to be, because the unchecked behavior of many people, without strong systems in place to encourage desirable behavior, can get pretty ugly. There's a reason pretty much any large internet site containing lightly moderated (or entirely unmoderated) user-contributed content is going to have a reputation for having lots of really vile things on it.

13

Upvoting is not an intrinsically positive behavior. Would you want someone to upvote obvious spam, "me too!" answers, or blatantly off-topic questions, for example?

I've said this before, but you really can't reward anonymous voting because there's no way to audit how well people are doing it. By the logic of your post, people could literally upvote 20 posts at full random and get free rep for it - the system wouldn't know any better, and there would be no way for anyone else to tell them otherwise.

I'm not saying that everyone would necessarily do that, just that you could do it and the system would reward you for it - there's literally no way that anyone would know. As one user pointed out in the comments on the linked post, "Binding a reward system to an action which is completely anonymous and where you're completely free to do all the wrong things... I wouldn't do that."

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .