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I have attached an image of a recent review audit which I was told I had failed.

Albeit brief, it seems like the answer directly addresses the question that was asked. Would anyone mind providing input about why I failed this audit?

As the image shows, I'm not able to see the accepted answer either.

enter image description here

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    You should link to the actual review, not a screenshot of part of the review. – Servy Jun 7 at 14:10
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    Have you seen the comment under the answer during the review? That answer looks like a post written to an old question but doing nothing more than repeating another answer for that question. – Tom Jun 7 at 14:11
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    Possible duplicate of Failed and banned for user who answered the question correctly? – gnat Jun 7 at 14:14
  • @Tom Yes, I did see the comment, but I did not feel comfortable blindly accepting that the comment was true without being able to actually see any of the other proposed answers which I think is prudent. – jkovba Jun 7 at 14:18
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    Pretty standard audit failure, rejecting a flag from a concerned SO user without looking at the other answers to verify whether or not there was any point in keeping it. There wasn't, somebody else already mentioned the 6 chars minimum two years before. Getting such flags rejected used to drive users pretty nutty so audits had to be added to teach reviewers how to get it right. You have to look. – Hans Passant Jun 7 at 14:19
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    There is a link to the original post if you felt the need to investigate – Suraj Rao Jun 7 at 14:19
  • Well that's useful to know. All of a sudden I had access to audit queues and didn't know the full original post was not present at the time of audit. – jkovba Jun 7 at 14:21
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    If you didn't know how to check the post, or don't want to verify a claim, hit Skip, not Looks OK, and leave it to someone who wants to invest that bit of extra work. There's no shame in using skip, and if you're a starting reviewer, I certainly recommend using Skip every time you have any doubts. You can check your review history at the link at the bottom of stackoverflow.com/review/first-posts/history, and review what happened to skipped posts to educate yourself. – Erik A Jun 7 at 14:34
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    You're choosing "no action needed" quite a lot, even for rather bad questions like my code is not running: to print random numbers between 1 to 1000 every second and you don't even take your time to do that review properly. You have several reviews with around 10 seconds apart. You even say you're new to reviewing and don't know the rules yet, that's fine, but why do you rush your reviews? – Tom Jun 7 at 15:10
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    as @ErikA pointed, There is no shame in using “Skip” – gnat Jun 7 at 15:43
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"It addressed the question" is not exactly a ringing endorsement of the answer. Do you really think that's a high quality answer that has no room for improvement whatsoever? Because your review action is saying as much. You said that there was nothing you could possibly do to either make the answer better, help the author make it a better answer, or provide any information on it's usefulness to the community, by saying that no action should be taken on this post from review.

  • I disagree. And I also don't believe you actually think every response you've ever approved "has no room for improvement whatsoever", so quoting policy doesn't exactly carry much weight here; it's hypocritical. I understand Hans Passants point and appreciate Suraj Rao's feedback, but it seems like SO has developed a culture where people are quick to critique, rather than enable, and quickly upvote in approval. That is diminishing, not helpful. – jkovba Jun 7 at 14:24
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    @jkovba Why are you reviewing if you're not interested in actually improving posts, and are simply interesting in marking low quality answers that need a lot of help to become good answers as not requiring any action? If you're opposed to any critique whatsoever then why did you come here asking for feedback? Were you only interested in people telling you that you were right? Because if so, that's not how this works. Just assuming you're infallable and attacking anyone for daring to indicate otherwise is not helpful. – Servy Jun 7 at 14:29
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    Well, audits were created because people were getting it wrong, and getting it wrong frequently, @jkovba. That's what this is supposed to do; make you sit up and pay attention. We have a very specific goal we're trying to accomplish, and reviewing is supposed to help make that easier. Allowing a duplicate answer that adds nothing of value just adds to the noise, the very thing we're trying to reduce. – fbueckert Jun 7 at 14:30
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    @Servy, you're making an awful lot of assumptions. I'm new to reviewing, so don't know all the in's and out's yet. I am not opposed to critique, I don't know where that notion comes from, but this is not helpful to me. I find these remarks inflammatory. I'm here to learn and to seek assistance. Rather than be spoken down to, it would be helpful to be pointed to some documentation that outlines the expectation of reviewers. Why wasn't that the first thing that someone offered? How to get better, not just why it was wrong. – jkovba Jun 7 at 14:32
  • The post was edited at least 4 times and was down-voted at least 7 within 23 minutes. That doesn't exactly give me a "helpful" vibe. It doesn't feel like those of you are on here enriching anyone, just being quick to point out what's wrong rather than fixing it. So, some feedback for everyone in the upper echelon. – jkovba Jun 7 at 14:35
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    No one is required to fix anything, @jkovba; we're all volunteers, so we can spend our effort as we see fit. Your feedback is negative because people disagree with your premise; you were told why you failed, and you're challenging that instead of accepting it. You yourself said you're new to reviewing; nothing wrong with that, but audits exist specifically because reviewers were getting it wrong. It's supposed to be a learning opportunity so that next time, you know how to perform the correct action. – fbueckert Jun 7 at 14:39
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    @jkovba It's fine to be new to reviewing. Being new means you'll make some mistakes. Learn from them and improve your reviewing going forward. That's fine. You can't say you're opposed to critique when in your previous comment you said people are critiquing you and that's not helpful. Also it's odd to say you don't want to be spoken down to while also going on about how new you are and how you don't know anything about what you're doing. You're asking to be spoken down to in a comment in which you say you don't want to be spoken down to. – Servy Jun 7 at 14:40
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    @jkovba If you wanted to learn the basics of how to review then first I'd start by reading through the help centers, faqs, etc. on the topic, as well as the links in the review page itself on reviewing, and if that isn't enough, considering asking a question about that, if that's what you want to be given. Don't ask why you failed an audit and then complain when people tell you why you failed the audit, instead of talking down to you by just linking you to the help center section on reviewing. – Servy Jun 7 at 14:40
  • I didn't challenge the notion that I was wrong. "It's supposed to be a learning opportunity"...how was this post a learning opportunity? For example, what did your post do to help me become a better reviewer? Interesting that responding to this this is how you "see fit" to spend your time. – jkovba Jun 7 at 14:41
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    ...Educating users on why they failed audits is now a bad thing? Okay. I guess that's what I get for trying to be helpful. Lesson learned. – fbueckert Jun 7 at 14:42
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    @jkovba Why is people editing your post unhelpful? Your post was downvoted because it's a pretty bad post, is generally not useful to the community, and far and away most importantly (in my opinion), because rather than acting constructively to the feedback you got defensive and responded poorly, it was only after you started doing that that your post attracted downvotes. – Servy Jun 7 at 14:42
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    @jkovba How isn't this a learning opportunity? You found a post, and thought that just because it addressed the question no action should be taken. Now you know you need to be doing everything you can to either improve the post, or help the author improve it, or, if it's not fixable, to use the moderation actions available to you to address that. The problem isn't that you didn't learn anything here, it's that you didn't like what you were told, and are refusing to act on what you've learned. – Servy Jun 7 at 14:45
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    @jkovba The "one character edit" was mine. It was done at the same time that I removed the "thanks!" from the end of the message (that's considered "noise" in SO, since it's not relevant to the post; thank users by using your votes or comment if you must). The character I added was to surround the screenshot with block-quote formatting, since screenshots have a tendency of getting mixed up with the site's UI (since you are logically posting a screenshot of this same site, with the same design and look and feel). I'm sorry it bothered you, I only meant to help. – yivi Jun 7 at 14:57
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    Come on folks... seems we're all quite passionate here but let's turn it down a notch please. – Jon Clements Jun 7 at 14:58
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    @Joshua I stand by my statement that if you cannot see any problems with that post purely from what's shown in the review queue then you should not be reviewing, making it a perfectly suitable audit. There are numerous problems with that post apparent right from the review queue, in addition to red flags of other problems worth investigating further. – Servy Jun 12 at 15:38

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