154

There are many tags which would probably be burninated if doing so was feasible.

Most of the DO NOT USE tags have a lot of questions in them. Those tags used to be valid in the past; we didn't have a quality system (a.k.a. burninate requests) back then. If we tried to remove those tags now, we'd get too many worthless old questions bumped to the front page.

Some tags, especially old ones, appear to simply have too many questions for burnination to be easy, at least not without a significant increase in helpers. Examples: (15k questions), (68k questions), (37k questions). There are many, many more such tags - just search for DO NOT USE.

Perhaps these tags will eventually be burninated, like what happened with , which had a DO NOT USE label at the end of 2014, but still got added to ~2000 more questions before burnination started 6 months later, because users did not read the tag description before adding it. Those added tags generally did not add any value (or added negative value) to their questions, and resulted in more cleanup work in the long run. (Burnination finished in February of this year)

Consider , which officially acquired DO NOT USE in 2012 by Shog9, but has gotten multiple tens of thousands of questions since then, which may eventually have to be cleaned up.


The site does have the ability to prevent specific tags from being used in the future, without requiring them to be removed from current questions first. Might we use this ability to prevent these sorts of DO NOT USE tags from actually being used, to improve tagging accuracy and question quality, and to reduce future cleanup workload?

Caveats:

  • Locked tags are (I think) expensive. Tags which have already been burninated usually do not need this:

    every tag [increases processing time] for little gain because most tags don't experience this problem

    But there would be much gain for active tags which should not be used, but are still being used daily. (Worst-case, to avoid increasing processing time, remove locked tags which are rarely triggered.)

  • Just because a tag has DO NOT USE does not mean that it will definitely be eventually burninated. Still, if there is a consensus, actually preventing it from being used would be useful.
  • New edits to old posts with a blocked tag must remove said tag for the edit to go through. It would probably be helpful for each blocked tag to have its short message suggest what an editor should do with it, maybe with a link to a meta post on it.

Note that I am not asking a "Do we have the ability to..." feature request - we do have the ability. I am suggesting that we use our ability (or, more precisely, that we make posts to discuss tags, come to a consensus on a lock message, and that the developers use the ability). Figuring out lock messages now is far easier and more efficient than having to sort through tens of thousands of questions years later.

  • 51
    More general: ..users did not read the tag description before adding it... needs fixing. That is an UX challenge. – rene Jun 2 at 7:25
  • 6
    I could also argue that the Do Not Use phrase is added prematurely. As a community we seem to prefer to discuss the removal of tags first, which led to the burnination process, and there the tag excerpt is updated (in step 4) after consensus is reached. – rene Jun 2 at 7:34
  • 2
    There are approx. 60 tags (a few false positives) that have DO NOT USE in some form. Roughly half of them are backed by a burninate request. – rene Jun 2 at 8:19
  • 1
    There has been discussion on some, but yes, the phrase should probably only be used as part of a more official process. Pretty sure many of these tags still exist not because of a lack of consensus and discussion, but because of a lack of manpower - getting to that step 4 takes so long. – CertainPerformance Jun 2 at 8:21
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    Well, we have made some progress the last year. When it comes to manpower there are more users prepared to back that statement then to actually get their hands dirty and dig in. – rene Jun 2 at 8:26
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    "Locked tags are (I think) expensive" - to me this just highlights the need to improve how it's implemented. There's really no reason this should be at all expensive, even with much, much more tags than what we have now. – Dukeling Jun 2 at 18:01
  • @rene: For some reason I wanna try automation-aided burnination. I can come up with a lot of high specificity mass queries on most large tags that would really reduce the workload if ran before or during user-level cleanups. – Joshua Jun 2 at 19:17
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    @Joshua if you don't mind, hop in Trogdor where you can find what we already have in place and find both regulars and mods involved in these efforts. Ideas to support the effort are appreciated. – rene Jun 2 at 19:21
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    @JarrodRoberson See the last paragraph in my question - that question is a feature-request for the ability to lock tags. We now have that feature. My question is suggesting that we discuss using that available feature. – CertainPerformance Jun 2 at 23:54
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    @JackBashford I'm not sure. "object" is too general and I find javascript-objects to be rather descriptive when it comes to what a person is dealing with. A lot of people mistakenly tag their question with json when they don't have JSON and instead mean objects. And in particular, object literals, as opposed to making an instance of a class. – VLAZ Jun 3 at 6:03
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    @rene the "people don't read tags" needs to be addressed somehow. Some tags have "DO NOT USE" written in capitals and still get used but my bigger gripe is with tags that explicitly say "DO NOT USE if you mean Y". The java and javascript tags are very often used interchangeably when people mean one or the other. I agree that to a newcomer, they sound very similar, but the site should try to suggest that they aren't. I'm sure other tags have similar problems. The system might try to verify that the user really wants "DO NOT USE" (in some form) tags. Dunno how best to have it not be annoying – VLAZ Jun 3 at 6:07
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    @JackBashford like excel and vba? That one went smoothly .... – rene Jun 3 at 6:43
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    @TinyGiant This isn't a request for an automated system prompted by a normal user edit. This is a request to examine tags currently describe as "DO NOT USE", write lock messages for them as appropriate, and then apply those lock messages. – TylerH Jun 3 at 15:20
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    Please, stop these tags from being further abused. – EJoshuaS - Reinstate Monica Jun 3 at 19:53
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    @TinyGiant See the second bullet point: Still, if there is a consensus, actually preventing it from being used would be useful. Discussion and general community agreement would most certainly be required for every tag beforehand. – CertainPerformance Jun 3 at 21:07
33

For the expensive part, can't we just have a client side blocking mechanism instead, it would prevent a lot of clutter happening front end. And people would really have to go out of their way to add it.

On this moment in tageditornew.js there is this event listener on tag-suggestions.

Q.on({
        "keydown": D,
        "keyup": N,
        "click": function(e) {
            $(e.target).is("a") || M($(this))
        },
        "focus": function() {
            xt && 1 === a ? M($(this)) : vt = !0
        },
        "blur": function() {
            vt = !1
        }
    }, "div")

Which calls

function M(e) {
    ut.val(e.data("tag-name")),
    L(),
    v(""),
    m()
}

If you'd implement a simple check before this run:

function M(e) {
    if(e.text().indexOf('DO NOT USE THIS TAG') > -1) { 
        e.css({
            'background-color':'red',
            'color':'#eeeeee'
        });
        return false;
    }

    ut.val(e.data("tag-name")),
    L(),
    v(""),
    m()
}

from the source at https://dev.stackoverflow.com/content//Js/tageditornew.js

/**
 * Called when a tag suggestion is picked from the autocomplete box - means we have a valid tag from server!
 */
function choose(jTag) {
    if(jTag.text().indexOf('DO NOT USE THIS TAG') > -1) { 
        jTag.css({
            'background-color':'red',
            'color':'#eeeeee'
        });
        return false;
    }
    input.val(jTag.data("tag-name"));
    cancelAutoCompletion();
    editTag("");
    cleanUp();
}

It would prevent the tag from being added. I tested this by putting a break point on the tageditornew.js line, reloading, modifying the script, and it prevented the tag from being added to the bar.

I don't have full insight in the framework, but with a simple warning like this, a visual cue, they will see the do not use(hopefully) and not use it.

Of course this code isn't perfect, it's more a concept, but it puts the action where it should be, at the user, notifying him/her/etc.. that there's something that needs attention.

blocked tag addition

  • 8
    We can't really just check for the "DO NOT USE" text, as this can be freely added or removed by any user with enough rep. – Dukeling Jun 3 at 16:39
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    @Dukeling True, but, tag wikis are usually meticulously checked, and one that adds a do not use without a proper meta discussion, will probably fail audits/quickly reverse. This trick/invalid do not use comment would cause a very quick discussion on meta and reversal of the wiki edit. – Tschallacka Jun 3 at 17:14
  • What about for API posts? A client-side addition is OK, but something server-side would still have to change to prevent the post from going through. – connectyourcharger Jun 3 at 19:27
  • 1
    @connectyourcharger Well, you catch a bit, so the growth of the "forbidden tags" are stemmed. And I don't know about what all implements the API, I would suspect the mobile app. I don't know how many questions are posted via api. But it will probaly be a lot less than those via the website – Tschallacka Jun 3 at 19:46
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    Tip: You can read the unminified source code on dev.stackoverflow.com. (see line 1047, suggestions.on({ keydown: choice_keydown, keyup: choice_keyup, ...) – CertainPerformance Jun 3 at 21:12
  • @Tschallacka I'm suspecting some sort of rebel would come and make posts with the API - there are thousands of developers online, and a lot of them are tech-savvy.It's not too far-fetched to think someone from a community of developers would try and abuse the system (even if they're not trying to be bad, per se). – connectyourcharger Jun 3 at 21:16
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    @connectyourcharger that would be cool. "hi, i hacked the stack with oauth to post my question about javascript-events. I cannot catch my event. Plz help. Thanks" – Tschallacka Jun 3 at 21:24
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    It's an interesting idea that could block most future bad-tag attempts, but the system already has the code needed to fully block said tags, and in a foolproof way, on the backend. The only roadblocks are moderator approval, and community consensus for each tag. – CertainPerformance Jun 3 at 21:26
  • @CertainPerformance I'll look and update the code tomorrow, I'm on mobile now. Thank you for pointing that out. What this would allow is to stem the influx of new questions, which would help a gradual burniation of the tags that go in the thousands. Without new posts popping up as much it won't be a sisyphean task anymore. Plus it aids people in reading what's wrong with the tag(hopefully) – Tschallacka Jun 3 at 21:32
  • @Tschallacka There's a possibility that somebody's going to do it, and it would be unreasonable to think otherwise. We as a community should be thinking with 100% confidence, not 90%. – connectyourcharger Jun 3 at 22:09
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    If you can block (or advise against) 90% of invalid uses of the tags, it's better than nothing. Also, if it's about making clear that the tags should not be used (assuming people overlook that fact), there is probably a only very small number of users that would use the API or any other work-around to use those tags. Of course, server side check is better if you want to completely close the gap, but this client-side solution could be a quick win. – GolezTrol Jun 3 at 22:24
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    @Tschallacka This would infuriate MySQL users: "DO NOT USE this tag for other DBs such as SQL Server, SQLite etc." – JL2210 Jun 3 at 22:26
  • 2
    @JL2210 we could do without them ;) – Luuklag Jun 4 at 7:27
  • 1
    @JL2210 what if I modify the string to DO NOT USE THIS TAG. – Tschallacka Jun 4 at 7:28
  • 5
    @connectyourcharger I see your point, but my counter argument is that what harm does it do if a small number of users try to circumvent this? They post a question with a bad tag? Good job to them I guess? This will still drastically reduce the number of questions using this tag. – Grumpy says Reinstate Monica Jun 4 at 15:28
3

I'm not a huge fan of these "DO NOT USE" edits. Primarily because they don't work all that well (as you observed...) but also because they suffer from much the same problem that burninations have: it's easy to convince a few people that a tag isn't useful - you just gotta find people who don't have any interest in it.

We have a process for burnination. We could add a process for locking too - but we need to exercise a bit of caution there: locking a tag should usually be a temporary step on the way to complete removal; with a very few exceptions, it should not be a permanent state.

BTW: I didn't add "DO NOT USE" to the tag - I removed it. Then a few years later someone added it back. The crux of the argument against was that it's full of bad questions - but removing the tag doesn't remove those questions, nor does putting "DO NOT USE" in its description. At best, it warns a tiny handful of people away from using it on otherwise-reasonable questions; at worst, it deprives answerers of yet another bit of signal they could otherwise use to ignore bad questions.

  • While it would obviously be better to always be able to properly clean up any tag deemed to not be a useful tag, the reality of the situation is most tags that there just isn't the manpower to manually clean up all of the tags that don't belong. Not locking tags that are unambiguously unhelpful just because there isn't enough manpower to clean it up entirely doesn't solve the problem. Just because it can't be solved perfectly doesn't mean locking the tag doesn't still provide some benefit. Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good and all that. – Servy Jun 18 at 14:05
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    The bit I'm missing here is what benefit - even minimal benefit - is being provided, @Servy. The critical guidance is what comes after "DO NOT USE": the list of more appropriate tags. In a certain sense what we really need here isn't so much a lock but something akin to a multi-target synonym that prompts the author to disambiguate. As an imperfect solution, I'd like to see less BIG CAP STATEMENTS and more getting to the point. – Shog9 Jun 18 at 14:14
  • The benefit is that by being unable to use the tag they thought they should used they're forced to figure out what they need to use instead, and there's a good chance they end up reading the information presented about the tags they ought to be using in their attempt to resolve their problem, rather than never reading the tag description in the first place because they never realized there was a problem. – Servy Jun 18 at 14:19
  • That's a good groundrule for a process then, @servy: define a fixed set of alternative tags. – Shog9 Jun 18 at 14:25
  • Agreed. It's mostly of value for ambiguous tags, not superfluous tags. – Servy Jun 18 at 14:26

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