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Recently I wanted to find out if there is a way to enable IntelliJ IDEA to play sounds when an error or a warning has been printed to console so that I can be quickly notified when running an application in full-screen.

In the absence of warning via sound I would have to either run the application in windowed mode on top of my console window or run it in debug mode with breakpoints placed on error and warning lines to pause application execution so I can see what's going on.

So like any good Stack Exchange user I decided to look for an existing answer to this question before asking it myself, and quickly found a solution in this answer.

Now since the question to that answer is completely unrelated to my problem and contains the solution only by chance, would it be appropriate to create a new question that directly asks for a solution to my problem?

In this case I would wait to see if anyone offers a different answer and then accept their answer if it better suits my needs or answer (and accept) it myself.

In short: Is it appropriate to create questions that directly ask for solutions that are indirectly provided in already existing answers to completely unrelated questions?

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    Not so sure it could be useful, googling "intellij play sounds" already lists plugins that seem to be a good fit. But it is your call. – Hans Passant May 31 at 13:45
  • True, the answer can be found with a bit of Googling (although not without a fair bit of reading about each plugin), but I am interested in knowing if asking these types of questions (described in the question) is a good or bad practice in general. – Matthew May 31 at 13:49
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    Creating a self-answered question is fine. Not always done well, users tend to skip on the question when they already know the answer. – Hans Passant May 31 at 13:53
  • @HansPassant Okay so it should be fine as long as I explain the problem in detail and provide an equally detailed answer so it can help others. – Matthew May 31 at 13:55
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    If you want to help others find the answer, another thing you could do is ask your question, mark it as a duplicate of the one containing your answer, and possibly adding a comment explaining. That way others can find the answer more easily, while it's still only answered in one place. If you flag as a duplicate, then refresh the page, you can accept the duplicate thus not requiring others to mark it as a duplicate. – Erik A May 31 at 15:06
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    @ErikA I like your out of the box approach, but how would flagging as a duplicate be correct if the question is in fact not a duplicate of the question that contains the answer? I understand that this would be a nifty way to avoid actually answering the question myself, but I would still need to explain myself in the comments. Wouldn't just answering the question be much more clean and simple? – Matthew May 31 at 15:11
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    @Matthew The scope of duplicates is a bit of a touchy subject, but many consider the question a duplicate if it's answered elsewhere, which is the case for this specific question. Also, it avoids trouble with proper attribution and changing the answer if it gets outdated. – Erik A May 31 at 15:17
  • @ErikA Could you further explain your last sentence? How would linking to an older answer that only by coincidence holds information that answers the new question avoid the trouble of changing the new answer if it gets outdated. I am having trouble conceptualizing this since the whole topic has an inception touch to it. – Matthew May 31 at 15:23
  • @Matthew By consolidating knowledge (keeping it in one place), it only has to get noted it's outdated in one place, and it only needs to be updated in one place. If you were to post your own answer, and it got outdated, and someone noted that in a comment, you probably wouldn't update the answer you found because that's outdated too, so it would need to be updated separately. – Erik A May 31 at 16:19
  • @ErikA Okay that makes sense. But what if feel I could answer the question in a much better way? In my example of an answer being in another question it just mentiones that Grep Console plugin can play sounds on regex match, but I would like to explain all the different ways of doing that and provide screenshots. Would a separate question-answer in that situation be justified? – Matthew May 31 at 16:31
  • @Matthew If you think you can provide a substantially better answer for people looking for your specific task, and it doesn't fit under the question the other answer is under, then you should by all means make it a separate Q&A. If it does fit under that other question, you could provide it there, so people that encounter that question can benefit from your answer too. – Erik A May 31 at 16:38
  • You have found your answer, so my recommendation would be to ask a new question and answer it yourself(the same answer you got) and with proper link to the original answer for the copyright – Gourav Jun 2 at 7:41
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Is it appropriate to create questions that directly ask for solutions that are indirectly provided in already existing answers to completely unrelated questions?

I don't really understand this question. How would the future reader know that the answer is elsewhere, if the question has nothing to do with their problem? Wouldn't be appropriated to make that information easily found by the future reader? How someone with the question "With what fruit you make an apple pie?" know that the answer is on the "What's the name for the fruit of the tree malus pumila?" question?

It's not only appropriated, it's desired that users unbury relevant information into Q&A pairs that are easily searchable and indexable by future readers. Otherwise, Stack Overflow wouldn't be much more different than a run-of-the-mill forum.

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I concur with the previous answer that supports following the proposed course. At least in the case presented by the OP. The comments presented by user Erik A and user Hans Passant did spur some creative thinking as well. The point, well made by Hans Passant, that many self-answered questions are poor questions when the answer is already known is a trap to be aware of in creating a self-answer question.

Expanding on the use-case given by the OP, to make it more generally useful, I can see 4 different options, each being appropriate in some cases, and not in others


The first option is to expand the existing answer, and perhaps a minor edit to the parent question, to cover the new, slightly different, question.

This seems like the best choice in cases where the potentially new question is merely a different way of looking at the problem. Something where the original question aligns well with the new question and the answer, even if not the accepted one, addresses the new question well.


The second option is to write a new, properly detailed, answer to the existing question. As in the first option, this might benefit from a minor edit to the original question.

My choice to use this would be when the original question is close to potentially new question, yet the answer(s) are not so well connected to the eventually discovered answer. Often this can be due to the existing answers being useful even though they are low quality. Or, the existing answer9s0 provides a solution only tangential to the discovered answer.

Actually, this is pretty much what happens with many questions where there are multiple "correct" ways to do something. One answer shows a solution using one method, another answer offers a solution with a different method, and both will work for the OP even though they have no significant common ground.


The third, very creative solution, given by Erik A in comments above is

If you want to help others find the answer, another thing you could do is ask your question, mark it as a duplicate of the one containing your answer, and possibly adding a comment explaining. That way others can find the answer more easily, while it's still only answered in one place. If you flag as a duplicate, then refresh the page, you can accept the duplicate thus not requiring others to mark it as a duplicate.
(Preserved here since comments are ephemeral.)

This option is one I wish I'd thought of many times in the past. After several searches, expanding my requirements to ever increasing vagueness, I finally find an answer. The answer provides a solution which works very well for my problem, even though the original question and mine seem to be worlds apart. This option allows creation of a totally different entry-point to a good answer, increasing the possibility that a web search will provide future users an answer faster. (It happens to benefit the old answer with potentially more votes as well.)


The fourth option is, as proposed by the OP, to create a new question, and self-answer it. Of course, this option can suffer from the same issues as any other self-answer questions, especially poor quality questions.

This seems to be the choice best applied to this question. The original question and answer are, at best, tangential to the OP's question. In addition, while the existing does accidentally mention playing sounds, it wouldn't be a quality answer to the OP's question, if asked. Lastly, while the existing answer does provide a clue to a solution, there may well be several other options. The other options might be completely inappropriate as answers to the existing question.


My recommendation for this case is to ask a new question, with the intention of creating a self-answer. The answer which the OP found barely mentions the needs of the OP's use-case and is barely an answer to the question it is attached to. Improving the answer would be useful in any case, while not making it any better as an answer to the OP's question. Improvement to the answer could even remove the reference to sound, since that's not connected with the question. The extra benefit to asking a new question is that there are likely several possible solutions to the OP's use-case, which a new question might elicit, which have not connection to the other question.

Meeting any requirements for citation would be as simple as saying "spurred by this answer I've found this solution." and then continue to detail how the solution works, and how to set it up.

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