9

What's the y-axis transformation used on the reputation chart?

I thought it was interesting how linear my reputation growth looked under this transformation, so I wanted to understand what it is.

The first interval between labels is roughly a 10x step (500 to 5K), and the second is roughly a 2x (5K to 10K). Assuming the labels are equally spaced, that would seem to rule out a log-scale, where equally-spaced intervals would correspond to multiplication by the same factor.

(I tagged this support and discussion since I'd welcome either an official answer or a conjecture supported by evidence.)

image

  • 13
    I'm pretty sure it's just max/min for the timeframe, and a midpoint. 586 at the start of 2016, 10.1k now, and (10.1k - 586)/2 = 5.4k. – Davy M May 29 at 22:37
  • @DavyM right. I guess I was expecting reputation would have some sort of compounding effect, given a baseline level of SO activity, and I missed something pretty obvious – C8H10N4O2 May 30 at 2:21
  • 1
    @DavyM: (10.1k + 586) / 2 . – Henk Holterman Jun 1 at 20:25
  • @Henk I mean, if you actually want the right answer you can add them, but if you don't mind being wrong like me, we can subtract them and pretend that (10.1k - 586)/2 = 5.4k hahaha – Davy M Jun 1 at 22:29
17

Short answer: none.

That y axis uses a linear scale, there is no log transformation or any other transformation here. The only uncommon thing about that y axis (and that's probably why you posted your question) is that it doesn't have a zero baseline.

While some kinds of data visualisations must have a zero baseline (like bar charts), you don't necessarily need a zero baseline in line charts. Actually, sometimes, the zero baseline is the wrong one. The most famous example is a line chart depicting temperature changes. Here we have a body temperature line chart (source):

enter image description here

As you can see, the baseline is not zero. Let's not only change Fahrenheit to Kelvin (SI), but also put a zero baseline:

enter image description here

Now there is no visible changes in the line, it's just like the ECG of a dead bloke. The same thing would happen if we used a zero baseline for a high-rep user, like Jon Skeet. This is (kind of) the chart we have right now:

const JonSkeetData = [{
  year: 2016,
  value: 781000
}, {
  year: 2017,
  value: 888000
}, {
  year: 2018,
  value: 997331
}, {
  year: 2019,
  value: 1108537
}];

const width = 300,
  height = 100;
const svg = d3.select("svg");
const padding = [10, 20, 30, 60];
const xScale = d3.scalePoint()
  .domain(JonSkeetData.map(d => d.year))
  .range([padding[3], width - padding[1]]);
const yScale = d3.scaleLinear()
  .domain(d3.extent(JonSkeetData, d => d.value))
  .range([height - padding[2], padding[0]]);
const lineGenerator = d3.line()
  .x(d => xScale(d.year))
  .y(d => yScale(d.value));
const rects = svg.selectAll(null)
  .data(d3.range(5))
  .enter()
  .append("rect")
  .attr("x", padding[3])
  .attr("width", width - padding[3] - padding[1])
  .attr("y", d => padding[0] + d * (height - padding[0] - padding[2]) / 5)
  .attr("height", (height - padding[0] - padding[2]) / 5)
  .style("fill", d => d % 2 ? "white" : "gainsboro")
const line = svg.append("path")
  .datum(JonSkeetData)
  .attr("class", "line")
  .attr("d", lineGenerator);
const xAxis = svg.append("g")
  .attr("class", "xAxis")
  .attr("transform", "translate(0," + (height - padding[2]) + ")")
  .call(d3.axisBottom(xScale));
const yAxis = svg.append("g")
  .attr("class", "yAxis")
  .attr("transform", "translate(" + padding[3] + ",0)")
  .call(d3.axisLeft(yScale).ticks(3));
.line {
  fill: none;
  stroke: limegreen;
  stroke-width: 3px;
}

.xAxis path,
.yAxis path {
  stroke: none;
}

.xAxis line,
.yAxis line {
  stroke: none;
}
<script src="https://d3js.org/d3.v5.min.js"></script>
<svg height="100"></svg>

Now have a look at the same chart, with zero baseline:

const JonSkeetData = [{
  year: 2016,
  value: 781000
}, {
  year: 2017,
  value: 888000
}, {
  year: 2018,
  value: 997331
}, {
  year: 2019,
  value: 1108537
}];

const width = 300,
  height = 100;
const svg = d3.select("svg");
const padding = [10, 20, 30, 60];
const xScale = d3.scalePoint()
  .domain(JonSkeetData.map(d => d.year))
  .range([padding[3], width - padding[1]]);
const yScale = d3.scaleLinear()
  .domain([0, d3.max(JonSkeetData, d => d.value)])
  .range([height - padding[2], padding[0]]);
const lineGenerator = d3.line()
  .x(d => xScale(d.year))
  .y(d => yScale(d.value));
const rects = svg.selectAll(null)
  .data(d3.range(5))
  .enter()
  .append("rect")
  .attr("x", padding[3])
  .attr("width", width - padding[3] - padding[1])
  .attr("y", d => padding[0] + d * (height - padding[0] - padding[2]) / 5)
  .attr("height", (height - padding[0] - padding[2]) / 5)
  .style("fill", d => d % 2 ? "white" : "gainsboro")
const line = svg.append("path")
  .datum(JonSkeetData)
  .attr("class", "line")
  .attr("d", lineGenerator);
const xAxis = svg.append("g")
  .attr("class", "xAxis")
  .attr("transform", "translate(0," + (height - padding[2]) + ")")
  .call(d3.axisBottom(xScale));
const yAxis = svg.append("g")
  .attr("class", "yAxis")
  .attr("transform", "translate(" + padding[3] + ",0)")
  .call(d3.axisLeft(yScale).ticks(3));
.line {
  fill: none;
  stroke: limegreen;
  stroke-width: 3px;
}

.xAxis path,
.yAxis path {
  stroke: none;
}

.xAxis line,
.yAxis line {
  stroke: none;
}
<script src="https://d3js.org/d3.v5.min.js"></script>
<svg height="100"></svg>

It shows way less information.

In short, as the comment in your question explained, the y axis range just uses the minimum and the maximum in that time frame. And that is the correct choice here.

  • 5
    I like your "And that is the correct choice here.". I got a majority of downvotes on my answer trying to explain the same.. Feel free to post an answer over there, as you're better than I at explaining what's going on on that chart. – Cœur May 30 at 4:51
  • 1
    @Cœur I don't understand that shipload of downvotes, your explanation about how the 3 ticks are calculated (min, med and max) is correct. However, I must say that the best answer for that question is this comment here: that's just an unfortunate rounding problem. – Gerardo Furtado May 30 at 4:57
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    @Cœur That particular answer appeared to be suggesting that having multiple identical Y-axis labels is somehow okay. It isn't. At the very least there should be more precision displayed in such a situation. If I've misunderstood your answer, then at least perhaps 41 other people misunderstood it in the same way, and now you know where the "shipload of downvotes" came from! – Lightness Races in Orbit May 30 at 13:51
  • 1
    @LightnessRacesinOrbit: Considering that the only alternatives are 1) Take up more space for numbers, and thus make the graph cluttered and difficult to read, 2) Lie more about what the numbers are, or 3) Base the graph at 0, thus making it harder to read. I prefer the truncated numbers. The graph is the important data; the numbers on the side are less so. – Nicol Bolas May 30 at 23:22
  • 3
    @NicolBolas There is a 4th alternative, which is checking the rounded values and, if the same, adding one more digit. – Gerardo Furtado May 31 at 5:36
  • The data has no meaning without usable labels. Graphing 101! – Lightness Races in Orbit May 31 at 10:18
  • 1
    @Cœur you deserve a special badge for an accepted answer with that many downvotes. – Erich Jun 1 at 4:47
  • @Erich I am very sorry because I received a second answer and I can't accept 2 answers at once (because they are both good) so I had to choose one of them. – zixuan Aug 23 at 16:32

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