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It's more black-and-white (to me, anyway) if they ask a question with either no details, no attempts, or no actual question. But in cases like this it's harder. It's not a "bad" question - it just doesn't fit the site.

Would it be feasible or practical to migrate questions like this to some sort of graveyard separate from Stack Overflow? It would have almost the same effect as deleting the question. The only difference would be a slight improvement in perception, especially for new users who just don't seem to get it. Instead of negative numbers, the feedback is, "We've moved your question to this other forum (where quite likely it will never get answered.)"

That could also provide a lower-risk forum for newer users to try answering questions.

I doubt that I'm the first person to think of this, so there's probably a duplicate question that I didn't find when I searched. (Maybe I'm about to get schooled on asking a bad question.) It likely also means that there's some really obvious reason why such a feature wouldn't make sense, and I just don't know what it is.

I didn't tag this with "feature request" because I'm more interested in understanding what does or doesn't make sense and why.

It's more black-and-white (to me, anyway) if they ask a question with either no details, no attempts, or no actual question. But in cases like this it's harder. It's not a "bad" question - it just doesn't fit the site.

Would it be feasible or practical to migrate questions like this to some sort of graveyard separate from Stack Overflow? It would have almost the same effect as deleting the question. The only difference would be a slight improvement in perception, especially for new users who just don't seem to get it. Instead of negative numbers, the feedback is, "We've moved your question to this other forum (where quite likely it will never get answered.)"

That could also provide a lower-risk forum for newer users to try answering questions.

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    If we create a place for junk questions to go...who's going to answer them? Or even try to improve them? – fbueckert May 15 at 16:06
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    Presumably no one. It's the same thing as downvoting or deleting a question. The only difference is in perception. – Scott Hannen May 15 at 16:09
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    Pretty sure there are couple of feature requests regarding the creation of some sort of "SO for noobs". – yivi May 15 at 16:10
  • Why exactly do we want to move questions to a place for them to die? How does that differ from just closing and deleting them, other than prolong the hope that help might be forthcoming? – fbueckert May 15 at 16:11
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    The example you give is a deleted question which a huge majority of the site can't see anyways, what difference in perception would there be? Unless you mean the perception of the asker, in which case, we don't want to make askers think that questions that don't belong here are okay to post anyways. Regarding We've moved your question to this other forum (where quite likely it will never get answered.), SO is NOT a forum, and it seems equivalent to just deleting the post (as it will not get an answer regardless), so I don't see how that would be a more positive experience to the asker eith – Grumpy says Reinstate Monica May 15 at 16:12
  • Some parts of your suggestion resemble a fairly common request titled something along the lines of "newbie section", usually rejected as it would be a blind leading the blind kind of thing. And if no one answers questions there, I'm sure it would gain the infamy of deletion and follow the typical accusations associated with it. – M.A.R. May 15 at 16:13
  • @Servy, my question made it clear why I did not tag this as a feature request. My question is about understanding the perspective, not asking for a feature. First you edit my question in a way that makes my intent unclear, and then you change the tag so that it doesn't reflect the original question. Please don't do that. – Scott Hannen May 15 at 16:13
  • I agree @ScottHannen, I don't get a "feature request" vibe from your question; you are explicit asking if it's feasible or practical, not if it should be implemented. – Grumpy says Reinstate Monica May 15 at 16:15
  • Thank you for your comments. As indicated in the part of the question that someone kept editing out, I didn't think it was a novel idea. I suspected that it had been thought of a gazillion times and there was a specific reason. I was just interested in understanding it. – Scott Hannen May 15 at 16:17
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    SOCVR invented this in 2013. Just saying... – Machavity May 15 at 16:21
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    related: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/261956/… – rene May 15 at 16:22
  • slightly related: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/255551/… – rene May 15 at 16:29
  • Perhaps "graveyard" was the wrong word, and a better metaphor would have been "nursing home where almost no one visits except occasionally a clown or some dude with dogs, because it seems more humane then putting the patient down, even though keeping them alive with tubes might not be all that kind anyway." But I didn't think of that. – Scott Hannen May 15 at 16:45
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    @ScottHannen If you're going to post a question requesting a new feature, then it needs to be tagged feature-request. Requesting a feature in a question but refusing to tag it as such makes as much sense as asking a C++ question and demanding it be tagged Java. That you want to mistag the question is irrelevant. The question needs to be tagged to reflect what it's actually asking. Tagging exists to help others find questions based on their topic. Intentionally mistagging questions only makes it harder for people to find the questions they're actually looking for. – Servy May 15 at 17:21
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    @GrumpyCrouton That's literally what feature requests are. It's a discussion of a proposed idea to see if it's feasible/practical. ** You literally just defined what a feature request is**. The OP saying they didn't want to tag their question as feature request doesn't mean it's not a feature request. If I tag my C++ question with Java saying I don't want it tagged as C++ that doesn't mean it's not a C++ question, or that it shouldn't be tagged as such. Discussions of a possible new feature request are what the feature request tag is for. – Servy May 15 at 17:56
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There already is such "graveyard": the question being put on hold/closed.

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    And maybe later deleted, but still visible for high rep users. – πάντα ῥεῖ May 15 at 17:36
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    That’s not at all what OP was asking for. You can’t even answer questions that are on hold/closed. No clue why he accepted it – Alec Alameddine May 15 at 20:16
  • @alec_a "The only difference would be a slight improvement in perception, especially for new users who just don't seem to get it. ... the feedback is, "We've moved your question to this other forum (where quite likely it will never get answered.)"" -- the key perception effect of putting on hold is this. The question is still there but "in limbo". – ivan_pozdeev May 16 at 3:49

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