18

When your answer is wrong...

... you copy/paste correct answer, add "My initial answer was wrong" and credits, voila!

Yes?

Here is such an answer. I have a strong feeling to downvote and flag it, but I am not sure. How should I handle this?

  • 14
    This happened nearly 9 years ago...why are we digging it up? I have seen a lot of older post in the feed today for no good reason then someone just trying to chew up old bones. – CoderJoe May 14 at 13:40
  • 13
    What grinds my gears more is that the answer was edited to be a carbon copy of the answer that was deemed correct if I judge the order of events correctly. – Gimby May 14 at 13:46
  • 3
    @Gimby yes that is correct, Wallace came and edited his answer 5 years after STO posted the answer to provide the same duplicated text – WhatsThePoint May 14 at 13:54
  • 7
    I assume that the author of the answer realized his answer was wrong, and since he probably couldn't delete his accepted answer, he tried to fix it by replacing it with the contents of a correct answer. – g00glen00b May 14 at 14:01
  • 8
    @CoderJoe, I think it's a very.. hmm.. brave form of plagiarism, that's why I am c̶a̶l̶l̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶p̶o̶l̶i̶c̶e̶ asking here. – Sinatr May 14 at 14:01
  • 33
    Comments like these do explain why there's such a shortage of answerers and why so many of the remaining ones answer questions in comments. Do stop downvoting correct answers, that is just hostile. Attribution was adequate, there wasn't anything else he could do. Go easy on your friendly SO users, you may need them some day. – Hans Passant May 14 at 14:17
  • 7
    Would you rather have the accepted answer stay incorrect? As the accepted answer it can't be deleted so updating at and attributing it sure seems like the best route. – Joe W May 14 at 14:22
  • 2
    @CoderJoe 2019 - 2015 = 9? – Tom May 14 at 14:28
  • 7
    The accepted answer is now correct and it used to be wrong. Hard to argue that is a bad thing. – Gimby May 14 at 14:29
  • 2
    That leads to question why did the OP accept the answer in the first place if it was wrong? should a user really change an answer if it was accepted? Accordingly what he posted may have worked for the OP @Gimby – CoderJoe May 14 at 14:31
  • 10
    I didn't object to you using your votes as you please, I objected against a bunch of meta visitors voting for no real good reason but to get-the-sonofabitch, it seems. I say my daily prayer, wishing one of my post won't be the subject of a meta question or an audit. So far it is working, rabbit's foot, four clover leaf and live lady bugs to cover all cases. – Hans Passant May 14 at 14:39
  • 12
    wonder if it would look better if answer was made community wiki after the edit. I myself tend to do this when it feels like I have to borrow too much from somewhere else (happens quite regularly in cross-site meta duplicates) – gnat May 14 at 16:06
  • 4
    The user did pretty much the best they could. They can't delete their answer, it's accepted. It's wrong, so they don't want to leave it, and it's accepted, so it's always going to show up first. move on. (i agree, CW probably would have been a good idea) – Kevin B May 14 at 17:09
  • 5
    I contest that the user did "pretty much the best they could". The best would be to leave the original content, explain why it doesn't suffice (possibly with an indication of why it would appear at first glance to be the appropriate solution), and also indicate that the other user's answer is actually correct. Why do we need two copies of the right answer? – Roddy of the Frozen Peas May 14 at 17:29
  • 4
    @double-beep how about this mirror of the question from 2016? – Wai Ha Lee May 14 at 20:24
43

In response to multiple flags originating from this Meta question, I decided to delete the accepted answer. I usually don't delete incorrect accepted answers, but I make exceptions in the cases where the answerer themself requests deletion or where the answer content has been removed or severely edited by the answerer because they recognized it was wrong.

Answerers cannot delete accepted answers, but they normally would be able to retract their own wrong answers. I'm sympathetic to this in the case of accepted answers, and I nearly always delete wrong accepted answers at the request of the answerer. I see redacting an answer or completely redirecting it to another answer as being a similar case, so if someone flags these I tend to remove them as long as no information would be lost.

Given that this is identical to the other answer there, I saw no harm in removing this to make way for the answer they admitted was correct.

  • 1
    As the answer is now deleted is it worth keeping this thread alive? – Roshana Pitigala May 14 at 18:13
  • 13
    @RoshanaPitigala Yes. Someone may want to propose a different course of action be taken (this, like most actions, is reversible), and it also serves to inform others about what to do if they find themselves in a similar situation. – Servy May 14 at 18:14
  • @Servy Hmm... I see... – Roshana Pitigala May 14 at 18:15
  • As the author of the now deleted answer pointed out that the answer provided by STO was correct, wouldn't it make sense to mark this answer as solution? Only in case this is something a moderator may do. – SaschaM78 May 16 at 8:59
  • 1
    @SaschaM78 We don't have a way to mark answers as correct, votes do the talking there. You are probably talking about the accepted checkmark which only the question author can apply to one answer, that is something different. – Gimby May 16 at 11:22
  • @Gimby thank you and yes, I was talking about the checkmark instead of using upvotes. But when looking at the question again I see that no moderator could checkmark an answer for the author as there may be several answers that may be the solution for the question author (in the case of the referenced question one answer containing the correct code was posted without explanation one minute before STO's version so there is no way to tell which one would have been picked by the question author). Sorry for taking this a bit OT. – SaschaM78 May 16 at 11:47
12

Flag this answer with request for deletion.

I have raised a custom flag with the message

I think this answer needs to be deleted due to the author admitting it was incorrect and redirecting users to another answer.

and it was marked helpful. Hope this is normal practice dealing with answers that can't be deleted by a user due to being accepted.

I'm sure such answers don't add any value to the site.

-11

Should we allow this?

The answer is simply no, The OP accepted the answer before it was edited to reflect the other users. That means the original answer either worked for the OP or was at the very least helpful to the OP.

What would happen today

Think about this as a mod

If today an answer was posted and accepted and then the answerer realizes that someone had a better answer then them and they copied their answer(while still giving them credit) the answer would still get flagged as "not an answer" and would be deleted or at the very least rolled back to the original

So weather its today or 5 years ago it does not matter we can't judge the question based on technical correctness, judge it for what it is...a direct copy of a better answer on the page

What should we do at this point?

I would suggest reverting the answer to the original with a note underneath stating that the answer is outdated to see the other answer instead.

  • 6
    What would we gain with this? – yivi May 14 at 16:43
  • 9
    Removal of plagiarism, for one. A rollback to an un-plagiarized version should be the first order of business. – Roddy of the Frozen Peas May 14 at 16:54
  • 2
    Better to properly credit the source, instead of having an accepted answer that it’s apparently wrong. – yivi May 14 at 17:00
  • 9
    Plagiarization requires the source to be unattributed, @Roddy. That answer looks pretty attributed to me. – fbueckert May 14 at 17:01
  • 3
    @yivi But the point is the OP accepted the original answer he didnt accept the edited version – CoderJoe May 14 at 17:09
  • I'm looking at this through the eyes of a mod repeating the statement "mods do not judge based on technical correctness" – CoderJoe May 14 at 17:10
  • 6
    @fbueckert - There is a point where attribution is not sufficient. I can summarize a newspaper article and provide attribution ("according to the New York Times article 'XYZ', {some claim}"), but if I copy-paste the full text of the article including the attribution, they're still going to come after me. Perhaps here it's not plagiarism, but it's definitely not fair to the user whose answer was duplicated. – Roddy of the Frozen Peas May 14 at 17:14
  • 1
    That's a better argument, @Roddy. It certainly isn't plagiarism, so that line isn't really constructive to use. – fbueckert May 14 at 17:20
  • @fbueckert - At my university this was still identified as plagiarism. But possibly it just falls under 'appropriation'. – Roddy of the Frozen Peas May 14 at 17:28
  • 3
    @fbueckert No, plagiarism doesn't require the source to be unattributed. Attributing a source while using the entirety of their work and adding nothing original is still plagiarism. It's appropriate when using another's work to augment your own, rather than simply copying someone else's work in entirety without addition. – Servy May 14 at 18:16
  • @Servy The definition of plagiarism is "the "wrongful appropriation" and "stealing and publication" of another author's "language, thoughts, ideas, or expressions" and the representation of them as one's own original work". Emphasis on "representation of them as one's OWN ORIGINAL WORK". – dtasev May 16 at 8:30
  • 1
    @dtasev You have a source for that definition? A significant majority of definitions I've seen (including SE's own definition, most relevantly) state that using others' work as the entirety of one's own contribution, rather than using the work of others to supplement one's own original work is also plagiarism, even if the work is cited. – Servy May 16 at 13:16
  • You folks realise arguing over the term used to describe the action doesn't actually bring you that much closer to a solution right? Call it plagiarism, call it copywrite theft, call it stealing, call it an answer heist, it doesn't matter; the issue is with the act itself and whether it is the right or wrong course of action, not the tem used to describe it. – RyanfaeScotland May 17 at 12:33
  • @Servy I struggle to find a source that is NOT that definition. SO: meta.stackoverflow.com/a/299918/2823526, OED: en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/plagiarism, Merriam-Webster: mtsu.edu/graduate/pdf/Plagiarism.pdf, Oxford University: ox.ac.uk/students/academic/guidance/skills/plagiarism?wssl=1. In University assignments you may be flagged for plagiarism if you quote something, but as long as you make it clear it is a quote and reference it, you will not be punished. – dtasev May 17 at 14:12
  • @RyanfaeScotland What? We're not arguing over the term, we're arguing over whether the action is PLAGIARISM or NOT. – dtasev May 17 at 14:14
-15

Nothing should be done on this answer

It seems that the accepted answer is currently correct, and that the author has properly attributed his source of the (updated) answer. Everything is working as intended.

I have strong feeling to downvote and flag it

You should absolutely not flag the answer. It was posted in good faith, and it answers the question with proper attribution. There is nothing a moderator should do about it.

About downvoting, nobody can stop you from doing it, but what would be the point? If the answer is correct it should be upvoted. This is true regardless if the previous version was not the best, we vote on the current version of the answer, not the previous versions.

  • I would have mod flagged this, solely because the OP of the answer himself said it was wrong, I'd rather see it mod deleted than to have the OP vandalize it or just plagiarize instead – Machavity May 14 at 19:54
  • perhaps you missed the part about it being plagerised, but you know the answer was changed, not improved. changing the answer is reason to flag or roll back anyway. – ocæon May 14 at 23:27
  • OP accepting the answer doesn't even mean it works for them. That should be the case, but I've seen several cases like that. – Jean-François Fabre May 17 at 9:03

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