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I would like to revisit a feature proposal raised a while ago, specifically in light of our new-ish code of conduct and the existence of the "unfriendly or unkind" comment flag (which I'm not quite sure if it existed back then).

The tl;dr from the original request describes my intention better that I ever could:

If a user isn't notified that their content was abusive or otherwise inappropriate, they can't correct the behavior. Notifying them thus helps them become more productive members of the site and reduces the generation of such content in the future.

This is different from "How to know if my comment was removed/flagged?" inasfar as the former is concerned with the user's perspective — "How do I keep track of whether comments of mine have been deleted and why?" — as opposed to this and the original request's intent of making users aware that their behavior is out of line with our community standards early on.

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    if the bad behavior persist they will get a message from moderator, so no need a notification for each message – Temani Afif May 7 at 19:25
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    @TemaniAfif why would the throwing early paradigm that works so well in programming not apply to human interaction? Providing feedback about/visibility into undesirable behavior as early as possible holds substantial value of its own, imo. – vzwick May 7 at 19:30
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    @vzwick You're warned to stay civil and professional all the time, even without extra notifications. So what? – πάντα ῥεῖ May 7 at 19:34
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    @πάνταῥεῖ We're abstractly asked to stay civil. Being explicitly notified that one of your comments was uncivil is far more likely to make you reconsider your communication style (note that I'm assuming that most of the condescending, abrasive commenters actually don't consider their own behavior uncivil per se and don't consider themselves part of the "toxic culture" issue). I'm not targeting all-out trolls and generally abusive people but rather the "I had a shit day and I'm firing off snarky comments" crowd. – vzwick May 7 at 19:42
  • @vzwick Well, the 'ole saying goes: "If you don't have anything nice to say, you'd better shutup." You can believe me, I've learned that the hard way. – πάντα ῥεῖ May 7 at 19:50
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    Just for clarification. Would this be an automatic notification or a personal one from the mod that deleted your comment? Because 1. comments can get removed by multiple flags, so not involving mods. 2. Without an explenation why it was rude I still won't learn anything. 3.personal notifications will increase the mod workload even more. – André Kool May 7 at 20:00
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    No thanks, my inbox is full enough already ... – rene May 7 at 20:05
  • @AndréKool I would definitely argue for an automated approach. Re 1., the notification could be triggered by "majority of flag reasons", for instance. Re 2: I, too, would prefer an in-depth lecture. But "hey, please (re)familiarize yourself with the code of conduct and consider how your comment might not have been quite in line with that" is way better than nothing. – vzwick May 7 at 20:14
  • @rene How many of your comments would be deleted for COC violations, on average, per day? – vzwick May 7 at 20:15
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    @vzwick well, all of them I guess. – rene May 7 at 20:16
  • @vzwick Do you really believe that individuals would take the time to "(re)familiarize [themselves] with the code of conduct" if they had received enough flags on a comment to trigger this notification being sent? In theory, they should have read the CoC when they signed up, meaning that they left an "undesirable" comment despite the fact that according to the CoC (which they supposedly read) it was wrong. What's to stop them "reading" the CoC again? – Ethan Field May 8 at 12:44
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    @vzwick Also, can we speak frankly about how the CoC doesn't actually relate to how people vote/flag on SO? Despite being told not to, there are always people who vote/flag for reasons that are specifically outlawed in the CoC, and equally, people that do not vote/flag content that should be actioned based on the CoC and conversations right here on meta. Asking them to read it again probably won't make them change. – Ethan Field May 8 at 12:45
  • What you're describing is a generic mod warning that happens once you hit a threshold. You get your notification, usually absent of any identifying links or examples, warning you to shape up. So...I guess this is status-complete? – fbueckert May 8 at 13:29
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If a user isn't notified that their content was abusive or otherwise inappropriate, they can't argue with moderators over the interpretation. Not notifying them thus helps everyone remain more productive members of the site and reduces the generation of such arguments in the future.

Fixed that for you.

We don't want people to argue about old, deleted comments. That isn't productive. Someone (the flagger) thought it was inappropriate, and a moderator agreed, so the comment is now gone. Problem solved.

If a user repeatedly posts abusive comments, then a moderator will review that pattern of behavior on a case-by-case basis and contact them privately. We get notified about users who have had too many of their comments flagged as inappropriate (this is distinct from "no longer needed").

  • I'm not trying to make the life of those with a diamond any more difficult than it already is. There's a million ways to implement a notification without making it a source of endless arguments. What baffles me, though, is that "helping promote the rules that we, as a community, agreed on" is apparently perceived as a nuisance rather than the very reason for mods' existence in the first place. I voted for you in the last elections, too, so ... – vzwick May 7 at 20:38
  • You seem to equate "notifications about deleted comments" to "helping promote the rules that we, as a community, agreed on" @vzwick. I disagree with that equivalence. There's quite literally no link between "promoting" a thing and sending a notifcation to one single human. If you want to promote the CoC, upon which we as a community absolutely did not agree, promote it, but single notifications is not it. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier May 7 at 20:41
  • No, @FélixGagnon-Grenier - I'm contrasting "people will be arguing with me and keeping me from being a productive member of the site" with "arguing with people is part of why I am a productive member of the site and part of my job description as a mod". – vzwick May 7 at 20:43
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    "There's a million ways to implement a notification without making it a source of endless arguments." Can you name one? Seriously, my argument is not really that it would be making the life of moderators more difficult, but rather that it is misplacing the focus. We don't want people to argue about old, deleted comments. That isn't productive. Someone (the flagger) thought it was inappropriate, and a moderator agreed, so it is now gone. Problem solved. If someone repeatedly posts abusive comments, then a moderator will review that on a case-by-case basis and contact them privately. – Cody Gray May 7 at 20:44
  • @vzwick That second quote is completely invented, you're contrasting with a strawperson. That's not what this answer means, in any way. You also miss the part where the normal users as well are being kept from being productive members of the site by arguing. These sentences are inaccurate. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier May 7 at 20:45
  • Cody, we seem to fundamentally disagree on what the problem is. You deem a deleted comment a problem solved. To me, the comment is not the problem but a symptom. You've deleted the comment, but the damage has been done: someone (OP, most likely) has been insulted, belittled, whatever - and thereby actively dissuaded from participating in SO. What's worse, the root cause remains unaddressed since nothing has been done to alter the behavior of the person who wrote the comment in the first place. – vzwick May 7 at 20:50
  • "Can you name one?" - Sure: inbox notification along the lines of "one of your comments has been deleted for violations of our COC. please take some time to familiarize yourself with ... (blah, blah, link)". Don't even include the deleted comment. Don't include the flagger's or the mod's handle (yes, this is intransparent, but not any more than it already is). – vzwick May 7 at 20:54
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    @vzwick: "inbox notification along the lines of "one of your comments has been deleted for violations of our COC. please take some time to familiarize yourself with ... (blah, blah, link)"." OK, I have thousands of comments on this site. How will I know which one among them was wrong, so that I can apply appropriate corrective behavior? Without including the deleted comment, along with a link to the context of that comment, there's no way to improve. – Nicol Bolas May 7 at 20:57
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    @vzwick: OK, now armed with a link to the question/answer, and the fact that it's recent so I probably remember some of it, I can then take to Meta SO and start rules lawyering as to why it wasn't "rude or abusive". And since I don't have the text of the comment, I'll be reproducing it based on my (undoubtedly biased) memory. See the problem? – Nicol Bolas May 7 at 21:02
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    @vzwick Look at the number of arguments we get now over why the comment someone flagged wasn't deleted. Now, imagine that passion multiplied many times over for the person who actually posted the original comment, rather than just a disinterested third party flagging it. How is this going to help anything? It's not; it's just going to lead to protracted debates and even more hurt feelings. The purpose of Stack Overflow's moderation system is to keep the site clean. It's not to educate people. It's not behavior modification therapy. The problem really is solved by deleting the comment. – Cody Gray May 7 at 21:13
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    "imo you're vastly overestimating the number of users who know or care about Meta and/or are passionate enough to argue about the finer points of the COC." Lol, where were you during the whole CoC debacle? – Félix Gagnon-Grenier May 7 at 21:14
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    @vzwick: "imo you're vastly overestimating the number of users who know or care about Meta" But you rarely use MSO. You have few comments, questions, or answers here. You lack the experience to make such a claim. – Nicol Bolas May 7 at 21:22
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    Ah yes, that's much clearer, thanks. I don't see standards being swept under, comments are deleted and repeated offenders are being talked to but I think I get you. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier May 7 at 21:52
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    @vzwick: "If MSO was suddenly overrun with people questioning the interpretation of COC, I wouldn't regard that as bad." Of course you wouldn't; you aren't the one who has to deal with it. It's easy to tell someone else to solve something you feel is a problem. – Nicol Bolas May 7 at 21:52
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    Having unproductive, navel-gazing discussions about comments that have already been deleted is a bad thing, whether or not it's grounded in the context of the CoC, because it's (A) a waste of time, and (B) going to lead to even more hurt feelings. I'm not sure how I can make this point any more clearly. Extended discussion in comments is also a waste of time, by the way. – Cody Gray May 7 at 22:01

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