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So, I spent the last day today editing some new questions, many of them unreadable, to clean up a bit, where I just try to improve readability and capitalise 'I' and enter apostrophes, correct spelling and sometimes even try to make thinks more comprehensible. Mostly minor stuff.

So far 6 edits have been approved and I have some more pending, so I am waiting that I can continue doing this. Obviously my edits are not perfect, but I consider them improvements and don't think anyone else would bother doing so, so there is no loss. But what makes this, an edit currently sitting at -3, a bad edit? How can I improve my editing so that I can further improve some more posts?

If you are really bored, I will attach some more of my pending edits, so I can continue doing what I am doing, but better?

This is it so you do not need to click the link

Further pending edits to take a look at if you'd like: (1) (2) (3) (4)

Edit: So, the other question ask a similar question, but is primarily opinion based and has no accepted answer. Even more so the answers and comments seem to agree that even smaller edits on unsalvageable posts are worth posting. But just to be sure I understand correctly: If I improve a unsalvageable posts by making it readable and improve its English, I deserve to get more 'rejected edits', which is shown when people are presented with my edits, since I put effort into something no one else thinks is worth putting effort into?

Edit2: Okay so yes, edit one is correct. Improving grammar and readability of inherently bad questions is a bad thing. I will just stop editing newly posted, bad posts, since, apparently 'This edit did not correct critical issues with the post - view the revision history to see what should have been changed.'

marked as duplicate by πάντα ῥεῖ, leftjoin, HaveNoDisplayName, Machavity, Nick A May 3 at 12:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    Because the poster may be stating that it is floating upwards when something is happening, and you've incorrectly edited it to say that it "should be" when that isn't what the original question is trying to convey'. – GROVER. May 3 at 11:15
  • @GROVER oh this could be true. But as you said 'may be stating'. I read it seven times, trying to make sense of it, and this is what I thought it said. – bv_Martn May 3 at 11:23
  • But what makes this, a edit currently sitting at -3, a bad edit There is no "voting" on suggested edits. There was only one approval on the suggestion. How did you come up with the -3 figure? – yivi May 3 at 11:27
  • @yivi at the moment of posting the voting went down from -1 to -3, and i did not bother to update the screenshot, since it does not change anything. It is now back 'up' to -2 – bv_Martn May 3 at 11:28
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    Voting on the post is not voting on your edit. No matter what your edit did for that question, other users could easily find reasons to downvote it. Also, your edit was not approved yet, so votes were being cast on the original revision. – yivi May 3 at 11:29
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    If a post should be closed, don't bother editing unless your edit can fix the post and push it out of the "closable" territory. – yivi May 3 at 11:31
  • @yivi wait so the '-1 votes' is reffering to the post and not the edit? oh okay that makes sense. And yes, I wanted to imporve horrible posts so people can read it without dying, and maybe show the poster that readability might be important to not get your question deleted. But eh, I will just stop doing it, I don't want to end up with 20 rejected edits. – bv_Martn May 3 at 11:34
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The root issue is that you're not really fixing the questions themselves. We sometimes call this "polishing turds", because it's merely a shiny turd afterwards.

Let's take this edit. You fix the grammar (good), but failed to note that the question is terrible in the first place. This is what the question would have looked like after your edit (I replaced the image URL since this is just an example)

The underlined UITextField with placeholder text should be floating upwards when the user enters something, and a bottom error text should appear to show a validation error as shown in this Image

Now this subsequent suggested edit addresses one problem you missed: trying to inline the image. We don't allow low rep users to post images since they're a potential spam source. Better still, it copies the image using the Stack Image Tool (in the toolbar above the edit window). We prefer those to be hosted directly, instead of being external links. This edit, sadly, also fails to address the other problems of the question.

The problem here is a fundamental one. The user posted an image instead of code. Worse, the image isn't actually of code, it's simply a picture of what he wants to do. There's no code at all. We expect every question to provide a Minimal, Complete and Verifiable Example (MCVE). If you look at the attempts to answer, you'll note one thing: they're guessing. Maybe use someFunctionHere? Here's a handy link to a tutorial I found that might do what you're looking for! Yet, nobody can answer this in any serious way because there's no code to work with. We don't know what makes his app draw it that way. In other words, no edit can actually fix this.

What you should have done here is flag the question for closure as Off-Topic -> No MCVE. If the poster edits the question, it goes into the reopen queue. I hope he does provide some code as to what he's doing. By adding an edit that doesn't fix the MCVE problem, you introduce the possibility that your edit tosses it into the reopen queue instead.

But oh well, as I said I will just stop editing posts all together, as it literally does not do anything for me.

Don't stop doing edits. You made a mistake and you took the time to ask on Meta which puts you ahead of probably 90% of all editors out there. Learn from this and make better (more meaningful) edits in the future.

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    Thank you very much, I'll just look out for questions which, after my edit, will still be up to communit guidelines – bv_Martn May 3 at 13:09
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Suggested edits should be as complete as possible:

In (1), you missed several things: At least one times i -> I and in the last sentence you fixed one have into has but not the second one.

(3): "I have tried this below" is not better than "I have tried with this below". For example, "I have tried the code below" would be an improvement.

(4) "I don't know how can I..." should be "I don't know how I can". And you left a thank you in the post. Also: "pluggin" is a typo and should be "plugin".

In general, you should only edit posts where the question is on-topic and of decent quality after your edit. The edit from the screenshot, for example, is still a no-effort low quality post after the edit. It is also not clear if the placeholder text should be moving up or if it is moving up and op wants to get rid of that.

Keep also in mind, that your edit comments might also influence the decision of reviewer. When I, for example, see a comment "imporved english" (note the typo), then I will check very carefully and be more lenient to reject if something is missing. Same goes for "and improved readablitz", "FIxed",

  • Oh shoot i hate it when my keyboard switches to german. But oh well, as I said I will just stop editing posts all together, as it literally does not do anything for me. But thanks for actually taking a look at these all and helping! – bv_Martn May 3 at 11:37
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    @bv_Martn: No need to stop editing (it is still a nice way to gain some rep in the beginning). Just be a bit more careful which posts you choose to edit. In the end, we all got some edits rejected at first until we had a feeling what was expected when editing. – BDL May 3 at 11:38

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