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This question already has an answer here:

As part of my Stack Overflow review volunteering, I had to flag a very low-quality question asked by a new user. However, due to the specifics of the problems this question has, I wasn't able to choose any one of the standard flags, all of which I'm very familiar with and regularly use.

So to submit my flag, I've chosen the in need of moderator attention option and wrote the following short but explanatory reason why I'm flagging the question:

No research was done and the question is unlikely to help anyone in the future.

A few minutes later, a moderator declined my flag specifying the following:

declined - Using standard flags helps us prioritize problems and resolve them faster. Please familiarize yourself with the list of standard flags: see What is Flagging?

The question was immediately put on hold (as it should) which confirms that I was right to flag it. Thus, the moderator's only reason for declining my flag was because I didn't use one of the standard flags and choose to specify my own.

I respectfully disagree and I think that the option is there so we can use it when we see fit. If a certain moderator is bothered by flags that specify a custom reason, then they should simply skip them and leave them for others who can handle it better.

Additionally, I would like to propose that all previously declined flags about a certain post/comment be automatically changed to helpful should the post/comment that they've flagged get through a subsequent flag by another user. This will help fix a user's declined flag score when their flag gets declined due to moderator error.

marked as duplicate by Cody Gray discussion Apr 29 at 5:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • I don't think that requires flagging, that scenario is covered by the "Vote-To-Close" mechanism. – Dale Burrell Apr 29 at 3:31
  • @DaleBurrell This was on my "Triage" review so I had to act on it and I don't have the Cast Close And Reopen Votes yet, so flagging was the best I can do. – Achraf Almouloudi Apr 29 at 3:36
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    There is also ignore - you don't have to act on anything. And you can always open questions in a new window if you wish to take actions not available in the review setting. – Dale Burrell Apr 29 at 3:36
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    You can "Flag For Closure" before you have 3K rep. – Dale Burrell Apr 29 at 3:39
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    As Dale mentioned, you can flag for closure even without having close votes. Those flags will be handled by the community, rather than moderators. – Rob Apr 29 at 3:41
  • @DaleBurrell I couldn't ignore such mal-formed question... As I said earlier, none of the flag for closure options gave me the proper reason why I think it should be flagged. – Achraf Almouloudi Apr 29 at 3:43
  • @Rob Oh I wasn't aware of this subtle difference, but that still doesn't explain why a moderator would reject my flag if the post in question should be closed. – Achraf Almouloudi Apr 29 at 3:45
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    I imagine because they want you to work out the correct action for the future. Its like when someone answers a question with "I don't have enough rep to comment so I am answering with a comment", which invariably gets deleted, because even though one can understand why they did it, it wasn't the right thing to do. – Dale Burrell Apr 29 at 3:47
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    @AchrafAlmouloudi The flag was rejected because, quite simply, we want to teach users to use the correct flags so that they're prioritized properly and sent to the most appropriate audience. There are thousands of community members available to handle your flag; there's only a handful of moderators. We just simply wouldn't be able to handle the amount of flags generated if people used custom flags rather than closure flags. – Rob Apr 29 at 3:50
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    And as you note, the question was closed by a moderator. Had your flag been marked helpful, you'd likely not have realized the difference in flag types. Now you do, so I'd say it's working as intended :) – Rob Apr 29 at 3:52
  • @DaleBurrell Sorry, but I don't see your point. If it's simply a matter of the correct action for the future, then I should have the power to act on it without moderator intervention. – Achraf Almouloudi Apr 29 at 3:52
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    @AchrafAlmouloudi We don't really go through and check a user's flags every time we handle one. You simply used the incorrect flag, whether or not it was your first or hundredth time. I'm not sure what you mean by it not being a lesson for you... a few comments ago you said you weren't aware of the difference. You're aware now – Rob Apr 29 at 3:58
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    I get you're trying to do a great job of your triaging - but you need to be a bit more flexible in your thinking and take on the feedback we're giving you. As someone who can "vote-to-close" I would have used the reason "too broad" which is saying "you haven't asked a specific enough question", which is the best available option for saying "you haven't done enough research". Said another way, saying its too broad is saying "You're asking too much of the community here, you need to do some more work (research) of your own before asking". – Dale Burrell Apr 29 at 4:20
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    But you would never have gained this clarification about how best to handle that situation - which is important because once you gain enough rep you'll be able to close-vote, so you need to be clear about how it works beforehand. – Dale Burrell Apr 29 at 4:33
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    Well, the literature to tell you what flag to use in what situation is readily available, but you still used the wrong one. What’s your more efficient alternative to getting you to know what the right flag to use is? – Clive Apr 29 at 6:49
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The flag decline message is pretty clear about why your flag was declined, and why it's important to use standard flags:

Using standard flags helps us prioritize problems and resolve them faster. Please familiarize yourself with the list of standard flags: see What is Flagging?

The explanation is literally right there in the first sentence. I'm not sure if you just skipped over that, or you simply found it unconvincing. In case it's the latter, perhaps it would help if I pointed out that, this month alone, moderators have handled over 60,000 flags—and there's nothing unusual about this month.

Raising custom flags in cases where standard flags would do just doesn't scale. We can't sort custom flags, which not only means we can't prioritize them, but it also means that handling them takes longer. You should only raise custom flags when one of the standard flags doesn't do, or when you need to provide additional context.

Furthermore, moderators are not your personal question-closing valets. The job of a moderator is that of an exception-handler. We step in when the community is unable to handle a situation on their own. That means we spend a lot of time investigating vote fraud, abusive behavior, consistently low-quality contributions over time, plagiarism, etc. We often close questions as part of carrying out these duties, but closing questions is not our primary job.

The community can, does, and should close questions on their own, without moderator intervention. Anyone with 3k+ reputation can cast votes to close questions, and anyone with 15+ reputation can flag posts as in need of closure. If a question needs to be closed, then you should flag it as being in need of closure, not flag it for moderator attention. The difference is, closure flags put the question into a different review queue that is monitored by all members of the community who are eligible to cast close votes, not just by moderators.

So, in addition to the reasons stated in the flag decline message, your flag was also declined because "this question needs to be closed" is not a valid reason to flag for moderator attention. It's a valid reason to flag for closure.

Beyond all of that, you say in a comment:

none of the flag for closure options gave me the proper reason why I think it should be flagged

If that's really true, then that means you shouldn't have flagged it. I decline a lot of "This is a homework question" flags for this same reason—who cares? If you can't find any of the close reasons that fit, then the odds are almost overwhelmingly that the question should not be closed.

Moderators don't have different close reasons available to us; we have to pick from the same buffet of choices that regular users have. So, if none of those fit, we can't close the question, either. And we shouldn't.

In this case, though, the question did need to be closed, and one of the standard reasons clearly fit: too broad. That's why I closed it as such. You claim that:

The question was immediately put on hold (as it should) which confirms that I was right to flag it.

but that is not the case. My closure of the question was almost entirely unrelated to your flag. They coincided only in the sense that your flag was what brought the question to my attention. My processing of your flag was entirely independent of my handling of the question.

You could have flagged it as:

bippity boppity boo

and I still would have done the same thing: declined the flag, and closed the question. Even if a post is misflagged, I still handle the post as it should be handled. And I decline the erroneous flags in hopes of educating the person who raised the flag that they are doing it wrong.

You also surmised that:

Thus, the moderator's only reason for declining my flag was because I didn't use one of the standard flags and choose to specify my own.

Yes, that is pretty accurate. Raising a flag for the wrong reason is sufficient grounds on which to decline that flag.

If a certain moderator is bothered by flags that specify a custom reason, then they should simply skip them and leave them for others who can handle it better.

There is no one else who was going to "handle it better". The flag decline message you got about using standard flags is one of the canned decline reasons that moderators have to choose from. The odds are greater than 99% that any moderator would have declined your flag for the exact same reason.

It's ironic that many people make this exact same argument with respect to closing questions: "if you are bothered by it, then you should simply skip/ignore it and leave it for others who can answer it". That's not how things are done on Stack Overflow.

Additionally, I would like to propose that all previously declined flags about a certain post/comment be automatically changed to helpful should the post/comment that they've flagged get through a subsequent flag by another user. This will help fix a user's declined flag score when their flag gets declined due to moderator error.

There was absolutely no moderator error here, and what you're proposing makes absolutely no sense. If you raise a flag for the wrong reason, then that flag should be declined. Nothing else that happens on that post should affect the disposition of your flag. Like I said earlier, if you had flagged the post as "bippity boppity boo", and then I later find out that the question was posted by a sockpuppet account, that would not be grounds for marking your flag as helpful. Flags are evaluated on their own, individual merit.

Speaking of the individual merit of your flag, you fundamentally misidentified the problem with the question. What your flag said was:

No research was done and the question is unlikely to help anyone in the future.

That is a great reason to downvote a question. The tooltip on the downvote arrow says pretty much exactly this: "This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful". That is, however, not a reason to close a question.

As stated earlier, there was a reason to close the question, but your flag did nothing to help me find or identify it. Your flag was just noise that got in the way. As such, it was declined.

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    Thanks for spending soooo much of your time to clarify things for the rest of us. Your posts are always clear, informative and very useful. – Dale Burrell Apr 29 at 7:08

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