34

I found this question in the featured tab. It reads to me as

Here is my current minimal code

<251 lines of poorly commented code>

Please make this fast and correct for big inputs. I think the answer might involve caching but I'm not sure.

Note that it needs to handle all these features:

  • Features

You can read these articles to help you understand your assignment:

  • Articles

Two days after the question was posted it was given a 500 reputation bounty by the author. I'm concerned that this user is trying to pay people SO rep in exchange for doing their job for them.

What am I missing here? As in the title, what differentiates this from the off-topic question I'm reading it as?

  • 42
    Before looking at the question: "Featured" literally just means someone has put a bounty on it. A question being there per se doesn't say anything about how good it is. – duplode Apr 27 at 19:21
  • 3
    Related: How can I close a question that has an active bounty? -- though I feel it is worth highlighting item #3 in Shog's answer there. – duplode Apr 27 at 19:30
  • 45
    I don't think it's a request for somebody to write anything. He has something that works, which he posted, but it isn't performing well. He provided a bounty to get more eyes on it as it is a non-trivial issue that someone is going to have to invest time in if they are able to help. He also provided pointers to further reading which I would find helpful. – Dave Apr 27 at 19:30
  • 19
    For what it's worth, that's exactly what a bounty does in all cases: "pay" people rep to solve their problem or answer their question. That in and of itself is not inherently bad, but working as intended (IMO). – TylerH Apr 28 at 0:07
  • 25
    The relevant question is excellent and on-topic. If you have a problem with it, you should reconsider your reasons for using Stack Overflow. You seem to be someone who has applied a strict reading of rules without understanding or care of why they exist. I say this after reading some of your other posts. Please, stop being one of these people who overly care about reputation and nonsense, and join us in helping to teach and learn. – Brad Apr 29 at 0:12
  • 5
    There's nothing fundamentally wrong with questions asking us to write their code for them (or asking to fix / improve code, which seems more applicable here); it's just that they usually have other problems, corresponding to the close reasons (asking us to write code does not have a close reason). If you can't find a relevant close reason, the question is probably fine. You could ask whether the provided code is an MCVE. I'm inclined to say it's not, and thus justifies closure for that reason (although this sort of thing tends to be quite subjective, and is sometimes hard to judge correctly) – Dukeling Apr 29 at 1:29
  • 3
    There's no indication that OP is not opened to reconsider their position @Brad. Actually, this post is compelling evidence to the contrary. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Apr 29 at 2:16
  • 9
    @BPL The goal of SO is, as far as I'm concerned, primarily to create a repository of high-quality questions and answers and secondarily to help askers with their immediate problem. Pursuit of this goal may sometimes frustrate askers, but is necessary to keep the quality standards of the site, to keep experts here and have questions that also help others. I agree with part of Brad's comment in that here might be some element of trying to enforce rules without fully understanding them, but the goal seems to be roughly in line with the primary goal of SO. – Dukeling Apr 29 at 10:32
  • 5
    the bounty is a thinly veiled attempt at keeping it from getting closed, nothing more ... – user10677470 Apr 29 at 15:19
  • 3
    All else aside, it's incredibly ironic that there's one close vote on this meta question as "primarily opinion-based". If what differentiates the main question from a "write my code for me" question is primarily opinion based, as opposed to very clearly allowed in the site guidelines, main question should most definitely be closed as well :P – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Apr 29 at 17:28
85

As the author of that question you're concerned about I feel obligated to give you my personal view about why I think my question is "ethically" correct :/ , I shouldn't be explaining anything though.

First of all, it seems you consider my question like a simple "write my software for me" question but I think you haven't considered behind this question there is a lot of research/job behind... before trying to use pygments on a QScintilla widget I've tested like dozen different solutions to come up with a proper Sublime Text standalone widget for couple of months already. That little MCVE I've posted on that thread is the result of a lot of research evaluating advantages/disadvantages about what I think it may become a good intermediate solution for pyqt/pyside2 apps.

My last attempt of having a nice QScintilla with a very versatile highlighter was trying to use one custom wrapper of syntect... you can see it uploaded here, but unfortunately I also got stuck with the same hard problem of figuring out a good optimization algorithm.

I'm concerned that this user is trying to pay people SO rep in exchange for doing their job for them.

You say this, but you sure haven't thought about all the effort I've put by creating a thread that a lot of people could benefit after all:

  • I've invested time to make my thread as compact as possible and yeah... this may look like a 5 minutes job but it's not. Actually is been few hours to come up with that piece of code which I'm giving away for "free" to the community

  • You're underestimating the fact I've put in 500 bounties!!! I've given the maximum amount, because I consider the level of effort in order to solve this thread is not low. In this case, you need to consider how hard is earning bounties... take a look for instance at all the answers I've given over the years on SO and you'll see the mean of reps/answer is quite low on my case, so yeah... well earned rep here :)

Yeah... nowadays earning rep on SO isn't as easy as it used to be 10 years ago...

In fact, if we follow your logic here... should I consider each time I've helped others with their questions I've been making their job for free/rep_points? To me SO is a community where EVERYBODY may benefit from questions & answers.

If I wanted people making my job in the first place I wouldn't be releasing any source code at all and I would be paying/hiring people.

Not only that, this thread is implying like I'm doing something wrong here... What's the purpose of the bounties in the first place? Over the time I've contributed to SO I can proudly say I've got "46 offered bounties for 6,400 reputation" and eventually I'd like to be the #1 person who more bounties offered... :)

When I use the bounty system I feel like a kid in a playground and I'll continue giving bounties to my questions because I enjoy that... it's one of those little tiny things that make SO a good "toy" to play with.

Plus, I've contributed long enough to SO and helped others countless times... it feels like your question is trying to make me feel guilty just by following the existing SO rules in the first place.

EDIT: @timotree I've realized you're the guy who added a comment in that thread asking:

What's the question exactly? Are you asking Stack Overflow volunteers to optimize your entire program for you?

and I've replied to you before this thread was opened:

@timotree The goal of this thread is to figure out how to use efficiently pygments on a QScintilla widget. It's not about optimizing the snippet I've provided but instead is about coming up with a way (be it with code or just words) that allows to use pygments+QScintilla on realtime (like any other text editor). Said otherwise, at this point it's still unclear to me on which parts I should use caching/memoization

I thought at that time my clarification was good enough, but after reading this thread it seems it wasn't :)

  • 37
    One thing I think is worth clarifying: your question is fine, imho. You shouldn't use a bounty as a way to justify it 'belonging' though: bounties don't make off topic questions on topic, or bad questions good. Your question was fine in and of itself, the bounty doesn't change anything (I do get where you're coming from though) – Patrice Apr 27 at 21:12
  • 4
    A quick search didn't give anything, so I'll write a comment here. Basically, the problem didn't come from the question itself, but the way you phrased your sentences (according to OP). A lot of misunderstanding can come from the way you bring information, even if you didn't intend it. – Clockwork Apr 28 at 7:28
  • 1
    Then again, after reading your question, and as Makoto pointed out at the beginning of their answer, the way OP understood your question was clearly an overstatement too. – Clockwork Apr 28 at 7:31
  • 46
    Questions that are perfectly ethical can be off-topic. Questions that took effort can be off-topic. Questions that can benefit people can be off-topic. Questions with bounties can be off-topic. Questions posted by established users can be off-topic. Nothing written here differentiates it from a "write my software for me" question. – timotree Apr 28 at 16:48
  • 38
    "this may look like a 5 minutes job", "I'm giving away for "free"", "I've put in 500 bounties!" All of these things are completely irrelevant as to whether the question is on-topic. – Michael Apr 29 at 8:58
  • 6
    Regarding "I thought at that time my clarification was good enough, but after reading this thread it seems it wasn't :)" It's best to add clarifications to the post itself, in addition to the comment. Comments are sometimes deleted, and clarifications should remain in the post. – Heretic Monkey Apr 29 at 11:07
  • 10
    The question is a prime example of how to write a question, well done. It's stellar. Unfortunately... it's still very, very broad. I have this code, it needs to perform a whole lot better and I don't know how. The result is that you're getting code review suggestions which border on educated guesswork, not actual answers. I'm on the fence if it is broad enough that it becomes off-topic, you don't get questions like this very often. A question with some actual meat on the bones. The fact that the answers are not too relevant or complete is probably to be expected. – Gimby Apr 29 at 15:23
  • 5
    That's fair enough, but in comments on the top answer you've written "Ideally the answer to this thread would provide a nice algorithm working out of the box" - this very much sounds like "write code for me" – DaveMongoose Apr 29 at 16:01
  • 2
    I don't see anything wrong about my comment, of course ideally i'd love to have a working solution out of the box... It's a problem i've struggled with for weeks afterall. But i also said if you were able to explain the solution with words would also be fine and I'd write the code myself, so what's the big deal? The hardest part is to figure out the right algorithm to implement after all... Not sure what you're trying to imply here :-) . Is my comment also offtopic lol ? This discussion is starting to become hilarious. The message i'm receiving on SO is also becoming clear... Anyway... :P – BPL Apr 29 at 16:26
  • 3
    Note that @DaveMongoose said "sounds like". I think he's pointing out that it's the kind of comment you would see on a "gimme teh codez" question (even though yours is not one of those), and may contribute to people getting that wrong impression. The really valuable end-result is the knowledge of what to do and why, moreso than a specific "working out of the box" implementation. Obviously that's nice, too, but Dave is trying to explain to you why people might get the wrong impression from that comment. Not to tell you that your comment was off-topic or shouldn't have been posted. – Peter Cordes Apr 30 at 5:02
45

This reads like an uncharacteristic overstatement:

Please make this fast and correct for big inputs. I think the answer might involve caching but I'm not sure.

Also - I had ignored the remark about "uncommented code" but that too is not germane to the question. So long as the code is sufficiently explained or at least talked to in the question itself, comments in code are not wholly necessary.

To me, the question is in a very tight and specific domain - Pygments + QScintilla. The problem is described very clearly and concisely, and a minimal code example (for this particular problem domain) is provided.

I won't specifically disagree with the whole features/articles section, but if that's your major complaint (as it would be mine), it's worth commenting to the OP and asking them to clarify why those are included or what value they have with their question. They're active and responsive on the question so they'll likely address any complaints you have with the framing of the question.

However, overall I don't see this question is too broad or otherwise off-topic. I also lack prerequisite knowledge in the technologies the OP is looking for help for, so perhaps someone who is better versed in Pygments + QScintilla can guide us here to victory.

27

I don't think it's a request for somebody to write anything. He has something that works, which he posted, but it isn't performing well.

It sounds like a good fit for https://codereview.stackexchange.com/ (it is independent from question whatever it is on topic in the SO)

Note that on codereview site answers are not obligated to propose improvements restricted to some areas listed by author of the question (for example it is OK to discuss solely poor variable names and ignore performance issues).

Quote is from What differentiates this from a "write my software for me" question?


I'm concerned that this user is trying to pay people SO rep in exchange for doing their job for them.

That is one of purposes of reputation and bounties. If question is on topic then it does not matter whatever it helps author in their studies, job or entertainment.

25

I will address one specific part of your case:

I'm concerned that this user is trying to pay people SO rep in exchange for doing their job for them.

Content curation here isn't meant to evaluate posts based on the intent of the poster. That isn't just because intent can be hard to judge from looking at a post, but crucially because the ultimate concern is with the content of the post -- in the case of a question, whether it is on-topic, feasibly answerable in our format, and valuable in the long run. At the end of the day, that matters far more than any notion of fairness regarding who works for whom.

  • That's true, although I think you misunderstand what I meant. The emphasis was intended to be on 'doing their job for them' something which is off-topic on this site. In other words my intended meaning was something along the lines of "I'm concerned that this bounty is going to result in users rewarding an off-topic question with in-depth assistance." – timotree Apr 28 at 1:36
  • 8
    @timotree (1) Bounties cast on closeable questions are a manageable risk -- see this question, and in particular the comments to Martijn's answer. (2) "The emphasis was intended to be on 'doing their job for them' something which is off-topic on this site" -- There lies the matter: "doing their job for them" doesn't make a question off-topic, nor is it a close reason. Questions of that sort often turn out to be problematic for various reasons, but they are closed because of those reasons, and not due to the intent of the poster. – duplode Apr 28 at 1:50
-11

If nothing else, this question is "Too Broad" (as any answers will be excessively long and most likely subjective) by even the most liberal interpretation and the bounty is clearly an attempt to thwart it being closed for that ( as well as multiple other valid reasons ).

  • 2
    What's your justification for calling it "too broad" in light of other answers indicating otherwise? – Makoto Apr 29 at 15:03
  • 4
    @Makoto "as any answers will be excessively long and most likely subjective". This is well supported by the answers on the question at hand, except possibly for "excessively", but it's most definitely subjective, and there are a nearly endless stream of solutions one could use. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Apr 29 at 15:06
  • 3
    @FélixGagnon-Grenier: I'm not sure what definition of "excessively long" you're using but the answers on the question at hand are nowhere near that long. The venerable and benchmark-worthy branch prediction fail answer is easily twice as long as the most upvoted answer. – Makoto Apr 29 at 15:13
  • 3
    No special expertise needed to compose a google search for "high performance real time language parser" second hit, one of many articles that would never fit in an answer box here, enjoy your hours of reading/listening pleasure. This is easily recognized as a non-trivial problem domain, just like concurrency, immutably and language/type system design. – user10677470 Apr 29 at 15:25
  • 3
    Accusing OP of attempting to thwart closure seems overly harsh. Bounties are there to draw attention to a question in order to get an answer (among other reasons). Unless there's a strong reason to suggest otherwise, we should probably go with the optimistic assumption that they used a bounty for that reason instead of publicly accusing them of acting maliciously. Did the question even have a single close or down vote at the time the bounty was added? If not, why would OP believe their question is en route to being closed, for it to make sense to attempt to thwart said closure? – Dukeling Apr 29 at 15:56
  • 2
    @Dukeling OP did mention the bounty as a reason why their question should be on-topic. While they may not have, it's not that much of a stretch to say that. As for "harshness", there's much more of it directed at the asker of this meta question than towards OP of main question, if you wish to intervene on that... – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Apr 29 at 17:03
  • @FélixGagnon-Grenier I didn't read that as an intentional attempt to circumvent quality controls or prevent closure. I read it as a misunderstanding of the bounty system, or perhaps the issue that's being discussed here, which is not helped by the reason given in this Meta question for why the question should be closed not actually being a reason to close. This is supported by the rest of their answer, which mostly addresses ethics instead of rules or long-term value. – Dukeling Apr 29 at 18:30
  • 3
    @FélixGagnon-Grenier: The length limit for SO posts is 30k characters. I expect it's possible to write a useful answer to the question in far less than that, and probably even a detailed answer that addresses most of the points in the question could fit in less than that. The fact that long answers are possible doesn't make a question bad. Only if way-too-long answers are necessary is a question likely too broad. The existing answers are not excessively long, IMO. They're not like 1 paragraph + 1 line of code answers like for most of the trivial boring question SO gets, of course. – Peter Cordes Apr 30 at 5:11
  • 1
    @JarrodRoberson Fwiw, you've provided one link I've already considered in my 2 months of research trying to create a SublimeText standalone widget... yeah, I'd considered (and discarded after creating a python wrapper) tree-sitter. Actually pygments+qscintilla is not the best solution out there but it may become good enough. Btw you're accusing me as the OP of something which is not true. <sarcasm> but yeah, sure, why not... let's continue engaging/encouraging people to stop creating high-quality "hard" questions so we may end up with bazillion of trivial boring questions... sure :P </sarcasm> – BPL Apr 30 at 10:47

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .