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Related to the [var] burniantion proposal. I first noticed the tag thanks to this important JavaScript question

(about 500 questions)

In Lisp-like and functional languages, introduces a list of local variables, each (possibly optionally) with its initial value.

As far as I can tell, let is simply a variable declaration syntax, much like its cousin var. More importantly, only 39 are also tagged , which means the excerpt is wildly wrong (128 are JS questions). Just like the [use] burnination, this appears the be a syntax tag only, meaning that

  • Most questions could be retagged
  • Some JS questions could be tagged (this is scoping syntax in that language)

Does it describe the contents of the questions to which it is applied? and is it unambiguous?

Not necessarily. I don't think that LISP, Haskell and JS use it exactly the same way

Is the concept described even on-topic for the site?

Scope and syntax are on topic

Does the tag add any meaningful information to the post?

No. Take this Lisp question. There's no "prog" tag because that's simply syntax. would be more appropriate here, and also eliminates the need for [let]

Does it mean the same thing in all common contexts?

Again, no. JS is the newcomer here and it doesn't seem that JS uses it exactly the same way other languages do.

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    Let is used for some more purposes in additional languages too: 10 questions about let tagged C# about linq statements, 1 VB.Net questions about the same thing, 2 VBA questions about property let, and more. – Erik A Apr 25 at 13:40
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    Also 5 with Kotlin that refers to the let{ } extension function – Zoe Apr 25 at 14:17
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    Oh, look, a word that has multiple different usages across several languages. What concrete topic could it be about? – Braiam Apr 25 at 14:27
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    There are a number of specific issues related to the use of the let keyword. It's clear, unambiguous, on-topic, and adds value to the question. I see no reason to get rid of it. – Tiny Giant Apr 25 at 15:28
  • The tag description would probably need to be updated- but I don't think the tag should be burned. – chevybow Apr 25 at 15:37
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    I see a pattern on burnination requests. "This is a good tag", "there's no issues with this tag" "this tag is correctly used", when the request provides several examples of badness, issues and misuse of the tag. If someone wants to dispute a burnination, they also have to provide the evidence that refutes the requester analysis put in their request. Otherwise these answers/comments are meaningless and shouldn't be used as criteria to determine whenever or not a proposal is supported. – Braiam Apr 25 at 16:26
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    @Braiam likewise I see a pattern on burnination requests: "This is a good tag that isn't causing any harm, but I would like to waste a bunch of time destroying value on the internet so lets burninate it." – Tiny Giant Apr 25 at 16:49
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    @TinyGiant you forgot "and this is why [reasons]" – Braiam Apr 25 at 16:50
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    So long as it makes a good Meta title, eh? – Lewis Apr 25 at 17:21
  • @Lewis but it has to be a good pun too. Remember, we have a critical audience – Braiam Apr 25 at 19:00
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    If anyone, shouldn't you burnimate both let and var ? (var actually seems worse) – Claus Jørgensen Apr 25 at 20:03
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    @Braiam Are you seriously advocating for a "guilty until proven innocent" standard?!? – Mason Wheeler Apr 25 at 20:33
  • @MasonWheeler that's not a fair comparison. If you are using TDD and a piece of code doesn't fulfill the test conditions anymore, wouldn't you fix it? The only difference here is that the tag never fulfilled the test conditions but our testing framework sucks. – Braiam Apr 25 at 23:03
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This tag suffers of the same problems other tags suffer: it's used as /keyword/ or a #hashtag. Tags aren't keywords nor hashtags. Tags represent specific, well-defined categories. If the tag isn't specific or well-defined it's failing that purpose. As the question already notes, the definition of the isn't self-contained. It depends on the content of the question it is supposed to describe. If I have to read the question to know what it's about after reading the tags... what purpose those tags are serving?

Another flaw, is that its creation should have never happened. On the tagging help page, it emphasize that there is a burden of proof on the creator to prove that other tags doesn't cover the topic the tag would be about:

Even if you have sufficient reputation, you should only create new tags when you feel you can make a strong case that your question covers a new topic that nobody else has asked about before on this site.

For most of the topics this tag could potentially cover, exist already more specific and well-defined tags already created. For the scope in language X, X already exists. The language tag doesn't mean "this question is about language X", it means "the topic of this question is about features and idiosyncrasies of language X". Those features and idiosyncrasies includes most of the basic functioning and behaviors. That's why when asking about a library, you add said library tag: it modifies/expands the features and idiosyncrasies of the language it supports.

The keyword "let" is a representation of a feature of the language, with its specific idiosyncrasies. The topic is already covered by another more specific and useful tags. It's wasting tag space and diluting the importance of the tags reducing them to mere keywords and #hashtags. For the above reasons it causes immediate and palpable harm. If we want to improve tagging, we need to treat tags as self-defined, unambiguous entities. Removing this tag, inches us towards that goal.

  • While I want to use tags as keywords, this certainly isn't a useful one. – Joshua Apr 25 at 17:32
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    If I tag a question [javascript][let] it is extremely obvious what the question is about. It is completely unambiguous. Likewise, if I tag a question [lisp][let] it is going to be completely unambiguous what I'm asking about. The fact that lisp and JavaScript are different doesn't make the [let] tag ambiguous. It just means that, like everything ever, context matters. – Tiny Giant Apr 25 at 17:51
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    @TinyGiant - You should probably post an answer to give your alternative viewpoint – Kyle Delaney Apr 25 at 17:57
  • @TinyGiant the tag page is very clear tags should be able to stand alone as the only tag of the question. – Braiam Apr 25 at 18:57
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    @Braiam actually that is incorrect. The part you're referring to is: "If the tag can’t work as the only tag on a question, it’s probably a meta-tag. Every tag you use should be able to work, more or less, as the only tag on a question. Meta-tags, like [beginner], [subjective], and [best-practices], are not helpful by themselves – they do not communicate anything about the content of the question." Notice that it says "it’s probably a meta-tag" meaning that it could be used as an indication that the tag may be a meta-tag, but that doesn't mean that it is a meta-tag. [let] is categorically not – Tiny Giant Apr 25 at 19:14
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    Notice that they also used "Here are some tips to help you determine whether a tag is a meta-tag", "more or less" and other non-committal phrases to mean that it should not be interpretted as a rule, but rather as a guideline case-by-case evaluation of whether the tag is a meta-tag or not. – Tiny Giant Apr 25 at 19:16
  • @TinyGiant I'm not quoting that part. When I quote something I use quotation marks. "Tags are a means of connecting experts with questions they will be able to answer by sorting questions into specific, well-defined categories." A tag that needs another tag isn't well defined by any possible interpretation. – Braiam Apr 25 at 19:32
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    @Braiam That is the only part of the tag page that talks about tags standing by themselves. If you're not referring to that section then you're just making stuff up. As for the quote about it being well-defined, come on. That's about as nonsensical as can be. A tag can be well-defined in context. – Tiny Giant Apr 25 at 19:33
  • Agreed here. If I can't be an expert on [tag], it shouldn't exist. No one is an expert on let. – Adam Smith Apr 27 at 0:13
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    @AdamSmith According to top users, I am. – Bergi Apr 27 at 12:09
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    @Braiam Does this answer really attempt to say that [javascript] is "more specific and well-defined" than [let]?! – Bergi Apr 27 at 12:10
  • @Bergi does your answer change when I change javascript for lisp? Now what if I change let for scope? – Braiam Apr 27 at 12:12
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    @Braiam No, the answer would not change. [let] is more specific. – Bergi Apr 27 at 12:43
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    I don't get how using tags as keywords or hashtags causes "immediate and palpable harm". They are not categories, and StackOverflow will never a well-organised, hierarchical and semantic categorisation system like in the German Wikipedia. (Or if it will, then not through tags). Hashtags are tags, as the name says, and they are supposed to be used like that. We cannot cannot "waste tag space", it is infinite. – Bergi Apr 27 at 12:49
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It is a quite specific variable declaration syntax, it would not be covered by a general tag like .
Do not burninate.

In Lisp-like and functional languages, introduces a list of local variables, each (possibly optionally) with its initial value.

As far as I can tell, let is simply a variable declaration syntax, much like its cousin var. More importantly, only 39 are also tagged lisp, which means the excerpt is wildly wrong (128 are JS questions)

The excerpt isn't wrong since JavaScript is a functional programming language, influenced by a Lisp dialect (Scheme).

I don't think that LISP, Haskell and JS use it exactly the same way

let declarations in all these languages are similar, and very different from other forms of variable declarations. There is nothing wrong with having a specific tag for this syntax.

Most questions could be retagged

They could, but is much too generic. It would be inappropriate to tag it , although that would be correct as well. If it gets burninated, it should be retagged to at least.

Some JS questions could be tagged (this is scoping syntax in that language)

Better, .

Does the tag add any meaningful information to the post?

Yes it does. It unambiguously specifies which syntax the question is about.

  • let in JS and let in Lisps are wildly different. let in JS shares a lot more genes with Scala's var and Swift's let, and unlike let in Rust and OCaml, you can't shadow previous let in the same scope. It's a binding declaration mechanism, but it does not work like a let ... in (like how Lisp, Rust, and OCaml do). – Isiah Meadows Jun 4 at 9:45
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This tag is not causing any harm, is unambiguous when context is taken into consideration, adds value to the question, and it accurately describes the content of the question.

If I tag a question it is extremely obvious what the question is about. It is completely unambiguous. Likewise, if I tag a question it is going to be completely unambiguous what I'm asking about. The fact that lisp and JavaScript are different doesn't make the tag ambiguous. It just means that, like everything ever, context matters.

I see absolutely no reason to burninate this tag, and I believe that doing so would be destroying value, and a disservice to the community and the internet at large. Removing this tag would not make the internet a better place.

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    "Tags are a means of connecting experts with questions they will be able to answer by sorting questions into specific, well-defined categories." A well defined category, doesn't need other tags to convey meaning. Tags should be able to stand by themselves. – Braiam Apr 25 at 19:35
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    @Braiam according to you. I'm perfectly OK with tags being well-defined in the context of accompanying tags. You're literally taking two words and assigning your own interpretation to them, then saying that that interpretation should be treated as a blanket rule based solely on your own say-so. I don't see anything there to suggest that it was ever intended to mean that every tag on the site should be able to exist as the only tag on a question and still make sense. That just seems like nonsense to me, and I fail to see how that interpretation is beneficial to the internet at large. – Tiny Giant Apr 25 at 19:40
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    The tag may be contextually meaningful, but it seems pointless. It's a primitive operation with significantly different behaviour between languages, but even if you narrow it to a single language, there will be no "javascript let experts", and nobody looking for questions about it specifically. The question would be relevant to anybody who's interesting in the minutia of the relevant language. If anything a broader tag like language-lawyer would actually make more sense (more precisely identify a useful group of users/questions) than keeping let as a tag. Maybe we could merge it into that. – Jeremy Banks Apr 25 at 21:09
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    In my opinion, anything you tag let in JS would more accurately be tagged scope or syntax. I personally don't see the value. – dlsso Apr 25 at 21:12
  • It is written: The first to state his case seems right, until another comes and questions him. – Joshua Apr 25 at 21:19
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    @Jeremy the expert argument is not and has never been a reason to remove a tag, and there are important distinctions regarding the use of the let keyword, so if someone is asking about those distinctions then the tag definitely adds value. I don't understand this "I think this tag is ambiguous so i recommend using a tag that could literally mean anything." If let is ambiguous then language-lawyer and syntax don't have any common meaning. – Tiny Giant Apr 25 at 21:53
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    Do we need a tag for every single keyword in the language, then? This is currently not a coherent place to draw the line. If we were consistent, we'd end up with more tags than can fit on questions. The tag limit exists to avoid exactly this kind of overuse; this is a textbook example of what Jeff wanted to avoid. – Jeremy Banks Apr 25 at 22:04
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    @Jeremy If you're asking about a specific keyword and the tag doesn't exist, then the creation of said tag would be appropriate. If there's no questions about a specific keyword, a tag for that keyword would not make sense. I think this is fairly straightforward. The same could be said for libraries and API's. We don't need a tag for a library that no one has asked a question about, nor would we need a tag for an API that no one has asked any questions about. I can't see how this could possibly be an example of what Jeff wanted to avoid, textbook or otherwise. – Tiny Giant Apr 25 at 22:50
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    @Jeremy keep in mind that this tag should not be used on every single question that includes code which utilizes the let keyword. It should only be used on question that are asking about the let keyword itself. – Tiny Giant Apr 25 at 23:44
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I used to outright oppose the continued existence of tags about syntax, and even now, if it comes down to a choice, I still prefer a sufficiently well-delimited tag about a syntax-independent concept to a tag about syntax. However, my views on that matter have softened over time, mostly for a simple consideration, which I will illustrate with an example. If questions which are essentially about let declarations in Haskell were reliably tagged with both and , entering [haskell][let] in the search bar would quickly lead me to questions about that specific feature, which would, in particular, be quite handy if I were looking for a preexisting question about some detail of how let works in Haskell for the purposes of linking to it elsewhere, or using it as a duplicate target.

Now, one might wonder whether questions about let in Haskell are, in fact, reliably tagged with . As of now, there are:

That means I can't rely on -plus- showing me all relevant questions about let I might hope to find; furthermore, changing that scenario would require permanent vigilance in making sure new questions about let are tagged with . While that dampens my enthusiasm quite a bit, I don't think a tag not being used often enough is a good reason for burninating it. In the absence of other signs the tag is "actively causing harm", I suggest we let it be.

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