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Context

A while ago I asked a question about compiling go to C [click here], and whether or not I could use a different c-compiler then the default. I received 2 comments, both asking me about the legitimacy of my question and questioners assumed that GO "cannot be compiled to C".

I provided both questioners with a link to the build options of go where it states you can create a "c-shared" library. To build this library by default GCC is used and I wanted to know if CLang could be used instead. In the meantime someone had provided me with an answer to the question in the comment-section.

I then noticed my question had been down-voted and subsequently closed as "too broad". Which is complete non-sense, so I provided argumentation in the comments below my question why it wasn't "too broad". Afterwards I voted to reopen the question.

Today I find that the question has been deleted because it has no answers and 2 downvotes. I am perplexed about this chain of events.

The down-voters obviously don't know Go well enough and the question did have an answer but it was not possible to list it as an answer since the question had been closed as "too broad". I received no suggests nor warnings as to what exactly was "too broad" about the question so I couldn't change any part of it.

In my argumentation I even state that the question can ben answered with "yes or no", since I can either switch out the compiler or I can't.

Question

Now to my question, how can I do something against these types of occurrences, which I feel are based on the lack of knowledge of moderators?

Screenshot for <10k user

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    "The down-voters obviously don't know Go well enough " Votes are anonymous, so that is never a proper argument here. – Sir E_net4 the Wise Downvoter Apr 12 at 11:43
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    Please don't assume that voters (of any kind) don't understand your question or don't have the expertise to judge it. Even if users don't have a single SO answer about this language/topic, that doesn't mean at all that they don't know that technology. (I, for example, have almost 0 score in C#, but in my daily work I write C# code for most of the last eight years). If you want any detailed discussion about your question, you should add a link to it. – BDL Apr 12 at 11:45
  • @E_net4 You're right. Though I doubt people would down-vote if they don't have a reason to do so. To not supply that reason yet still down-vote seems odd to me. So my assumption is that the down-voters are the same as those commenting on the question. Since stackoverflow is about helping someone out. – Byebye Apr 12 at 11:45
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    Votes are not supposed to be accompanied by a comment explaining anything. So you shouldn't expect that they do. – yivi Apr 12 at 11:46
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    That false assumption of commenters being the downvoters is one of the reasons why feedback should not be made mandatory. – Sir E_net4 the Wise Downvoter Apr 12 at 11:47
  • Also, it's likely that "moderators" (as in, community elected moderators, designated by a diamond icon) were not involved, but simply other regular users (which you could call user-moderators, but it seems unlikely that's what you meant). – yivi Apr 12 at 11:47
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    Since stackoverflow is about helping someone out: That's not the primary mission of SO. The big goal is to create a "library of detailed answers to every question about programming". Helping askers is a nice by-product of this. – BDL Apr 12 at 11:48
  • @double-beep Will do. Should I strike-through the user-names? Since I'm not out to make damage reputations. I just want to know what to do in cases like this. – Byebye Apr 12 at 11:54
  • In the hypothetical case that a question is closed for invalid reasons, you can plead a case on meta and if people agree they will cast reopen votes. Alternatively you could drop into the SOCVR chat room. – Gimby Apr 12 at 11:59
  • Generally: if a question is closed and you want to contest the closure, you should edit the question to show address the close reason (either by improving the question so the closure no longer applies, or by addressing the close reason and explaining why it doesn't apply). The first edit after a closure will push the question to the re-open queue, where other users can vote to re-open if they think it shouldn't be closed. – yivi Apr 12 at 12:01
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    [1/2]Things I note when reading the question and comments: 1) stating "in an answer to another question" without linking to it is useless. Noone can see what is stated there and in which context. Almost the same as saying "I did research" without showing what one has found. 2) Your comments should instead be an edit to your question. 3) Explain that actually didn't mean "compile to C" but "compile to C library". 4) Show what you are currently executing. Go can compile to "C-Archive" or to "C-Shared Library" (don't know which you are actually using). – BDL Apr 12 at 12:17
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    About the mission of SO: The goal is to create a library where anything can be found and can be used by a large number of future visitors. Helping a human-being (or the asker) is not the main goal. Helping a large number of people is. – BDL Apr 12 at 12:19
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    SO gets far too many questions to guarantee personalized help with each and every one of them. Most people will try to focus on questions they feel are good uses of their time, and just downvote and close the ones that aren't. Requiring specific feedback such as comments to cast judgement on a post means you just get less voting, and that declines the quality of the site. – fbueckert Apr 12 at 13:26
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    @Byebye But you were given feedback on what was wrong with your question. Your question was closed for being Too Broad. You can't claim that you weren't given feedback on your question when you were. You can say you don't agree with it. That's different. – Servy Apr 12 at 13:58
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    To give a bit more credence to what fbueckert is saying: keep an eye on the home page. Look at the amount of stuff that would help no one but the asker. Start commenting on them and explain and guide and mentor and...... Tell me after 3 months how you feel? This is just not scalable:/. That's why we have automated systems like the closure to provide standardized feedback – Patrice Apr 12 at 14:14
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I provided both questioners with a link to the build options of go where it states you can create a "c-shared" library.

That is not what you asked about. In this context, a "c-shared library" is just a binary shared library whose calling conventions are the standard for C, and thus are compatible/accessible by anything that can speak C's calling conventions.

Your question talked about compilation "to c". As in, C the language, not C the calling convention. That task is typically called "cross-compilation", and it exceedingly complicated. Also, there's no compilation mode from Go to C the language. As such, your question is far too broad.

The best way to avoid this in the future is to take people at their word. If they say "Where in the Go toolchain does it compile Go to C?", you should assume that something in the wording of your question made them think that you were asking about cross-compilation. Look at your question from a dispassionate perspective and find out what is making them think that. And then make it clear that this is not what you're talking about in the question, not in a comment below.

  • I agree and I should have worded it in the manner you describe. However, how could I have rephrased my question in that manner if the question gets closed and deleted well before I get a response from the commenters? I can't clarify anything if I don't know which information is lacking. I don't mind having to rephrase, that's how I learn. I simply don't get why a question gets closed in this manner without telling someone how they could narrow the scope of the question. Thanks for the response, I will mark your answer as the answer to my question. – Byebye Apr 13 at 14:22
  • @Byebye: "how could I have rephrased my question in that manner if the question gets closed and deleted well before I get a response from the commenters?" That didn't happen. The question was closed ~18 hours after you posted it. It was commented on well before then, so you did know what information was lacking. As evidenced by the fact that you responded to those comments, and your responses were posted while the question was open. You had ample opportunity to fix your question before it was closed. And pretending otherwise is unhelpful. – Nicol Bolas Apr 13 at 14:29
  • That didn't happen That did happen. After arguing why I felt the question wasn't to broad I asked: "Please elaborate how I should alter the question" The question was closed ~18 hours after you posted it. I have work during the day and I'm not looking at notifications from stack-overflow most of the time. so you did know what information was lacking. So from the conversation above, you were able to find out what the commenters think was lacking. Or, did you posses the knowledge for what was lacking yourself? – Byebye Apr 13 at 14:38
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    @Byebye: "I have work during the day and I'm not looking at notifications from stack-overflow most of the time." We aren't obliged to wait for you to come back to the site. If your question is close-worthy, then we close it. "Or, did you posses the knowledge for what was lacking yourself?" I don't use Go or Clang, but your question here was explicit about using "c shared library", not compiling to "c", so it biased my thinking. Which is kind of my point: you said the right thing here, so why couldn't you say the right thing there? – Nicol Bolas Apr 13 at 14:46
  • @Byebye: That is, because you knew what you wanted, and because the commenters were talking about something that wasn't what you wanted, you had enough information to understand the misunderstanding. So it doesn't matter if I would have or not; what matters is that you should have. – Nicol Bolas Apr 13 at 14:46
  • If your question is close-worthy, then we close it. As they should. Again, I don't care about the closure itself. what matters is that you should have. Well for one, there is nothing that I "should have" done. Either I know something, or I don't. If I don't, then I can't say I should have because at that point in time I lacked the knowledge I do possess now. you had enough information to understand the misunderstanding I asked for elaboration exactly because I didn't understand. Just because the information is there doesn't mean I understand it. Clearly I didn't. – Byebye Apr 13 at 15:03

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