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This question already has an answer here:

From the survey:

Survey weighting is an approach used to analyze survey data when the survey sample doesn't match the underlying population well. For example, in our survey this year, 11% of US respondents identify as women, but data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that women's participation in the software developer workforce is about twice that, more like 20%. We can use survey weighting to adjust for the mismatch between our survey sample and the population of developers. We know that there is a difference in developer type representation by gender, so let's compare the overall proportions in our raw results for the United States with weighted proportions, assuming that we undersampled gender minorities at the rate indicated by the BLS report.

  1. Did SO consider that maybe the US Bureau of Labor Statistics have different standards of accepting someone as a developer than SO?
  2. We are doing a survey on SO to read results collected through SO. Why involve estimates from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics in it?
  3. "Data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates" & "assuming that we undersampled gender minorities" so basically the weightage system was used because of estimations and assumptions?
  4. Why was this year's survey results focused that much on genders? Wouldn't it make the gender minorities feel more exclusive by mentioning it again and again that they are only 10 - 20% of the community at best?

Side note: if you do a Ctrl + F on the survey page, you will find the word Gender 45 times and Development, Software, and Programming 27, 25 and 8 times respectively :)

EDIT: Note that this other question is specifically about how the gender weightage is calculated whereas my question is more about why gender holds that much importance in a developer's survey and why was there a need to use the gender weightage calculation in the first place, and I mean sure gender is a metric to look at but so is weight and hair color of the developers, maybe SO should include that as well in the next survey?

How much developers are making categorized by which technologies they are working in and which country they are in(I could not found this data in the survey btw) is the kind of data I am more interested in as a developer compared to what % of backend engineers are male or female.

marked as duplicate by jhpratt, davidism, Daedalus, Stargateur, rjzii Apr 13 at 4:50

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    It is a core demographic for the business that SO (the company) is in, finding those elusive three-to-six years of experience programmers that everybody wants to hire. There is an enormous shortage of those available, so they have to dip into the "untapped resource". Making them feel comfortable about filling out their resume at SO is very, very important to the company's bottom-line. – Hans Passant Apr 11 at 22:34
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    Even from strictly business point of view: Do you have your own business where 1 million new users really means nothing (which is roughly how many more users would be there if distribution is aligned with US Bureau of Labor Statistics)? Most existing businesses would spend a lot to find a way to get those users... 10% growth is not exactly trivial thing past initial phase... – Alexei Levenkov Apr 11 at 22:35
  • For those voting this as "primarily opinion-based", StackOverflow had a reason as an organization to include questions about demographics on their survey, and chose to do so for good reason. It is valuable to discuss the insights that can be gained by looking at how different groups of people have different experiences on a site. I know that I've personally heard people say they feel StackOverflow is "gender neutral", so having quantitative data that shows the site is experienced differently by different genders can reveal important, overlooked aspects of the site. – Conspicuous Compiler Apr 12 at 23:17
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    @ConspicuousCompiler I voted as POB because any non-employee answering is essentially taking a complete guess. Only an employee could tell us why they included these stats. – jhpratt Apr 13 at 2:03
  • @HansPassant what is the primary purpose of conducting this survey? to help developers or to grow the company's business? And I am sure SO has an analytics team who is already dipping into the "untapped resource" – Fakhar Ahmad Rasul Apr 13 at 11:05
  • @AlexeiLevenkov is the purpose of this survey gaining that 1 million users and to increase business? And I am sure SO is already spending a lot to get those users and they have a team already working on it – Fakhar Ahmad Rasul Apr 13 at 11:16
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    @FakharAhmadRasul: "what is the primary purpose of conducting this survey? to help developers or to grow the company's business?" Yes. – Nicol Bolas Apr 13 at 13:41
  • @NicolBolas yes to which part? – Fakhar Ahmad Rasul Apr 13 at 16:52
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  1. Did SO consider that maybe US Bureau of Labor Statistics have different standards of accepting someone as a developer than SO?

That may well be. But considering that the SO survey's standards are basically the honor system, you'd be hard pressed to argue that the BLS report is the less accurate of the two.

  1. We are doing a survey on SO to read results collected through SO, why involve estimates from US Bureau of Labor Statistics in it?

Because BLS is a pretty reasonable source, and its reports differ from those of SO. Given that SO's survey is entirely self-reported, and thus has pretty strong selection bias, it makes sense to attempt to correct for that bias by using an external report that presumably has less bias.

It's hardly a perfect system, which is why they provide the uncorrected results as well.

  1. "Data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates" & "assuming that we undersampled gender minorities" so basically the weightage system was used because of estimations and assumptions?

Well... yes. To do otherwise would be to operate on the assumption that the BLS is wrong and the SO survey with regard to gender representation in programming is correct. Either way, you're making an assumption. So the real question is which is more likely to be correct.

In any case, if the purpose of the survey is to get an idea of what the programming profession is like, then attempting to correct for discrepancies in how the survey is conducted makes sense.

  1. Why was this years survey results focused that much on genders? Wouldn't it make the gender minorities feel more exclusive by mentioning it again and again that they are only 10 - 20% of the community at best?

Last time I checked, hiding from reality never helped anyone. After all, isn't that the whole point of the survey? To understand where programmers are, what they're doing, and what they are like? That requires asking questions about them and looking at those answers.

Also, I contest how "focused" the results are on gender. Over half of the mentions of the word are in headings for sections like "weighted by gender". Yes, there are questions about gender. And sexual orientation. And race. And other things. I wouldn't really call it a central theme of the survey; it's primarily brought up in the "Demographics" section.

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    Basically any good survey you see will use weighting and will use best available data to do that. There will always be arguments for one or another weight but BLS is probably the best for US employment. – Elin Apr 12 at 0:34
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    @Elin "...any good survey you see will use weighting and will use best available data to do that." Which also means that any good survey is correlated via this calibration data surveys with each other. One should be aware of the risk that they are all equally wrong in some aspects. – Trilarion Apr 12 at 7:46
  • I am sure that BLS must be a very reasonable source, but I am also sure that there must other reasonable sources of data which is conflicting with SO's data and if being reasonable and having conflicting data is the criteria of getting included in this survey, does that mean that all the other reasonable sources of data should be included in this survey as well? – Fakhar Ahmad Rasul Apr 13 at 11:33
  • @FakharAhmadRasul: Um, why? You're basically saying that if you use one piece of data as a correction, you have to use all data? That just gets exceedingly cumbersome, as you'd need a whole bunch of tabs for each one. It's a correction factor, and an optional one at that. – Nicol Bolas Apr 13 at 13:41
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    @Trilarion They all have assumptions, but those assumptions are not all equally wrong. – Elin Apr 13 at 15:47
  • @NicolBolas why not? why is one piece of data so privileged to be included and not other pieces of data? – Fakhar Ahmad Rasul Apr 13 at 16:52
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It is a cultural effect. In the currently ruling ideology of the western civilization, the liberalism, topics related to gender, races and similar are hot. Thus, dealing with them attracts many visitors, commenters and so on. And the SE (llc) is an U.S. company.

For people from other regions, or following different ideas, it might be irrational. However, talking about this result is imho surely not harming; at least I could imagine far worse focal points, too.

Furthermore, the expected result of the consecutive developer surveys was a little increase in the ratio of the women. The decrease is surprising and considered widely as a bad development (surely practically no one would be happy on that).

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    I follow the same ideology of liberalism and I agree the results are not harming but I think adding the gender weight was really unnecessary – Fakhar Ahmad Rasul Apr 13 at 11:50
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    Warning: disagreeing a post is not a deletion reason. You are free to vote it down, but clicking delete, because you disagree, is a power misuse. – peterh Apr 13 at 15:11
  • @FakharAhmadRasul I think the results are harming, because there should be nothing what avoids the women to work as programmers, and the results hint that there is. Talking about the results is not harming, although making it to the focus of the evaluation is imho a cultural effect. What do you understand on "adding the gender weight"? – peterh Apr 13 at 15:14
  • @FakharAhmadRasul Btw, the liberalism doesn't want you to fully accustome its ideology. It is enough if you don't break its taboos. If you openly oppose it - or, at least you make it obvious -, but without breaking its taboos, like I did here in my post, then they will tolerate you. – peterh May 10 at 10:54

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