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The wiki for the tag list two distinct possible meaning for the tag

  1. The JMP instruction used in various Intel CPUs.
  2. A statistical graphical program developed by SAS.

Because it has multiple meanings we should disambiguate this tag.

There exists a synonym that would work as a standalone tag for the graph package. Then the tag could remain with a single meaning.

There are currently 135 questions tagged with , 83 (over half) of which are also tagged . Additional questions add or (or other software development related tags) with or without the tag. There are 11 questions (less than 10%) with the tag, which is a language used with the SAS package.

My proposal: Make the a standalone tag (not a synonym), retag those questions currently tagged with that refer to the statistics package, and narrow the focus of to just refer to the JMP instruction.

Is this a reasonable idea? Any reason why we shouldn't do this?

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    Let's not [jmp] to conclusions about what the tag means – cs95 Apr 9 at 4:14
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    Do we really need a special tag for each assembler instruction? If I develop a programming language with 12000 keywords, will we have 12000 additional tags? I would get rid of the assembler jmp-tag. – Thomas Weller Apr 9 at 5:56
  • If you're sure that those two are the only uses of [jmp], feel free to go ahead and disambiguate the tag. However, write up a concluding answer stating what all actions you took, and the number of posts that were retagged. If there are a significant number of posts in both the tags, that means that both of them should have their own separate tags, and [jmp] should be a synonym to the major one. – Bhargav Rao Apr 9 at 6:09
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    There are no [assembly] programmers that target SAP and no [sap] programmers that write their code in assembly. It is not ambiguous, don't waste anybody's time on this please. – Hans Passant Apr 9 at 10:00
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    @HansPassant: probably [jmp] should be deleted. Either way the tag wiki needs to be cleaned/deleted to not overlap with [sas-jmp]. We do not in general have tags for families of assembly instructions; by comparison, call is a total dog's mess. – smci Apr 9 at 11:03
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    jmp is an assembler instruction for pretty much all assembler languages, not just x86. – Lundin Apr 9 at 13:15
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    Umm also there's completely random stuff tagged jmp, not just the 2 mentioned areas. So maybe sas-jmp and jmp-instruction. – Lundin Apr 9 at 13:18
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We do not need tags for specific asm instructions, as per the consensus of Creating tags for single assembly instructions?.

[x86] [assembly] provides enough context for a search on "jmp" to find posts that mention it. (Although to be fair, it will appear in many Q&As that aren't specifically about it).

Or [68000] [assembly], because that ISA also has a jmp instruction! In fact it's a fairly common mnemonic.

Many SO [jmp] questions are about x86 because x86 has a variety of weird and wonderful(?) versions of jmp, e.g. jmp far to update CS:[ER]IP instead of just [ER]IP for a near jump.


That previous meta question was about x86's LEA instruction, which is a more clear-cut case of an instruction that doesn't need its own tag: LEA only does shift/add integer math (with its only quirk being that the source operands use memory operand syntax and machine encoding). Once you grok that, there's zero mystery.

LEA only has one opcode for the mnemonic, vs. jmp having near and far forms, and direct/indirect, and its own unique syntax for operands for far jumps in AT&T vs. NASM vs. MASM.

So one canonical duplicate can't really cover everything about jmp and call, but having tags for them is still probably not great. A [jmp] question is more often about understanding the basics of call vs. jmp and the super basics of how execution normally continues to the next instruction , not just the operation of jmp itself.

Or for far jumps/calls, about understanding segmentation.

The amount of questions that could


Replacement tags to add when removing jmp and/or call:

  • x86 (and/or x86-64 or x86-16), 68000, or whatever. These and [assembly] are obviously essential but missing from some questions.
  • subroutine is maybe a good replacement for call and questions about how to get execution to return. (And Assembly 'call' vs 'jmp' is a possible canonical duplicate for jmp-vs.call questions for near calls on x86).
  • real-mode and/or memory-segmentation are good for questions about far jumps/calls.
  • masm, gas/att, nasm, fasm, emu8086 - syntax of how to write operands for jmp obviously depend on which assembler. ljmp $0x0, $0x7c00 e.g. is only useful in AT&T syntax, for example, and yes there are differences between Intel-syntax assemblers in what they accept for jmp far operands.
  • jump-table for indirect jumps that look up a pointer from a table.
  • Maybe something that just indicates "Flow control" which when combined with one of the assembly tag points to the correct category. Usually the confusion around JMP applies to the whole flow control system of the particular architecture. The issues around, say, an old Z80 and a modern Intel processor are very different, but the issues are systemic. You probably dont get a problem with that single instruction, but rather the whole scope of flow control on that architecture (Ie how does relative addressing work, paging, etc) – Shayne Apr 12 at 6:37
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I very much agree that the tag should be cleaned up. Delete synonym ; make it a real tag, and move the handful of questions on to the new tag. There are less than 150 total questions tagged and I didn't see any really bad ones on a cursory review.

There is no point in waiting in line for the burnination queue here.

For reference: here are all the questions tagged that are not clearly assembly questions:

1

I've cleaned this up. I've edited the tag wiki to discourage its use. References to the JMP instruction have had the tag removed (adding and other relevant tags if necessary). References to the SAS package use the tag.

Total edit statistics:

  • 32 questions retagged from to
  • 4 question had the tag removed (already had other appropriate tags)
  • 83 questions had removed and were already tagged with (possibly adding an architecture tag)
  • 14 questions had removed and added (possibly adding an architecture tag)
  • 2 questions had removed

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