23

I was answering this question, and I was unable to post my answer due to containing code that is not properly formatted as code. All my code has been formatted properly as far as I can tell.

Here is the answer:


You can probably make the shape of the t-shirt and lights using SVGs, and the animations with keyframes.

Blinking Animation:

.blinking{
	animation:blinkingText 0.8s infinite;
}
@keyframes blinkingText{
	0%{		color: #000;	}
	49%{	color: transparent;	}
	50%{	color: transparent;	}
	99%{	color:transparent;	}
	100%{	color: #000;	    }
}
<span class="blinking">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</span>

In the @keyframes blinkingText selector, each percent represents a change at a certain point in the animation. In the .blinking selector, the animation:blinkingText represents which @keyframes animation will be used, the 0.8s represents the time interval that an iteration of the animation runs for, and the infinite means that the animation won't stop.


Rotating Animation:

.rotate {
  animation: rotate 2s linear infinite;
}
@keyframes rotate {
  from {
    transform: rotate(0deg);
  }
  to {
    transform: rotate(360deg);
  }
}
<div class="rotate" style="width: 100px; height: 100px; line-height: 100px; text-align: center;">Lorem ipsum</div>

Happy coding!

More animation tricks

More on keyframes


What is going on?

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  • 8
    Why is this text: "You can probably make the shape of the t-shirt and lights using SVGs, and the animations with keyframes." formatted as code? Same for ">Blinking Animation:"? – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Apr 2 '19 at 0:12
  • 1
    @HovercraftFullOfEels I put the whole answer formatted as code to make it clear as to what is part of the answer and what is not. – Jodast Apr 2 '19 at 0:14
  • 15
    @Jodast: And in doing so, you made it hard for us to tell what is formatted as code and what isn't. Thus defeating the whole point of showing the answer. – Nicol Bolas Apr 2 '19 at 0:16
  • 3
    That makes it much less clear, at least for me. Perhaps you want to take an image of what you're actually trying to do and what the site is telling you. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Apr 2 '19 at 0:16
  • @NicolBolas what would you prefer? – Jodast Apr 2 '19 at 0:16
  • 2
    @Jodast: You could use quotation markup. Or just horizontal rules bracketing the text. But use something that makes it clear without disturbing the formatting of interest. – Nicol Bolas Apr 2 '19 at 0:17
  • Edited, but it doesn't show the exact markup, just the end result – Jodast Apr 2 '19 at 0:18
  • Looking at what you had in the first revision, did you really not have a space between a quote formatted line and the start of a code block? >Blinking Animation: .blinking{ – BSMP Apr 2 '19 at 3:38
  • @BSMP I tried it by removing that, still doesnt work – Jodast Apr 2 '19 at 4:11
  • 1
    Remove all quote formatting and put both your code examples in runnable snippets. If the issue is some weird white space, that might fix it. – BSMP Apr 2 '19 at 6:13
  • With the edits you've made, I'm pretty sure that you've fixed the problem and can now post the answer. If you still can't, please say so clearly. A screenshot of the error (and of the answer editor, including preview) might be helpful, just to make sure that what you've shown us here really matches the actual answer you're trying to post. – Ilmari Karonen Apr 3 '19 at 17:46
  • 1
    (Note: You're not supposed to have the "Happy coding" there. See this meta post: Should 'Hi', 'thanks', taglines, and salutations be removed from posts? ) – user202729 Apr 6 '19 at 4:36
31

In the first version of this question where you post your original markdown, you had indented code only one line down from your quoted text. When posting blocks of code there has to be a blank line between it and any other text.

Your other visible issue is that in your original code your snippets are broken. Both are missing the start tag even though they both have the end tag for runnable snippets. This would still result in normal code formatting for most of the code because it's still indented.

However, the preview should have shown you this:

Blinking Animation: .blinking{ animation:blinkingText 0.8s infinite; }

Which is incorrect formatting. It also should have shown you normal code blocks for the rest of your code instead of a runnable snippet.

Try posting the version below. You can always make the text bold if you really want your section headers to stand out.


You can probably make the shape of the t-shirt and lights using SVGs, and the animations with keyframes.

Blinking Animation:

.blinking {
  animation: blinkingText 0.8s infinite;
}

@keyframes blinkingText {
  0% {
    color: #000;
  }
  49% {
    color: transparent;
  }
  50% {
    color: transparent;
  }
  99% {
    color: transparent;
  }
  100% {
    color: #000;
  }
}
<span class="blinking">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet</span>

In the @keyframes blinkingText selector, each percent represents a change at a certain point in the animation. In the .blinking selector, the animation:blinkingText represents which @keyframes animation will be used, the 0.8s represents the time interval that an iteration of the animation runs for, and the infinite means that the animation won't stop.

Rotating Animation:

.rotate {
  animation: rotate 2s linear infinite;
}

@keyframes rotate {
  from {
    transform: rotate(0deg);
  }
  to {
    transform: rotate(360deg);
  }
}
<div class="rotate" style="width: 100px; height: 100px; line-height: 100px; text- 
    align: center;">Lorem ipsum</div>

CSSReference.io - Animations in CSS

Mozilla Developer Network - Web Docs - @keyframes

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  • They did both have the start tag in the real answer, I just removed it because it wouldn't show the snippet in the answer. – Jodast Apr 5 '19 at 20:12
-19

Don't respond to questions like that with code solutions. It's a no effort code request and should be closed, not answered.

The appropriate action is flag -> should be closed -> too broad.

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  • 35
    So you're saying the system is smart enough to know that question should be closed and thus prevent OP from answering it? I mean great (!), but why doesn't it close the question directly, or even better, prevent the asker from posting it in the first place? – Kaiido Apr 3 '19 at 8:10
  • 8
    @Kaiido No, I'm not saying that and I doubt the system is that smart. I have no idea why the OP couldn't post their code, I only know that they shouldn't be posting any code in this case. – Lundin Apr 3 '19 at 8:29
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    This should have been a comment, not an answer. If someone else has a similar problem in the future and find this question, this answer will not help. – Pablo Apr 3 '19 at 14:11
  • 4
    @Pablo This is tagged support not discussion. The OP wants help with their specific issue. – Lundin Apr 3 '19 at 14:14
  • 24
    @Lundin Yes, support for why they can't post their answer due to a system-level block. Your answer would be appropriate if it were tagged discussion, not support, because your answer is just an opinionated suggestion on user behavior, not an explanation or resolution for a technical issue with system software. – TylerH Apr 3 '19 at 14:18
  • 3
    @Lundin stackexchange answers are always intended to help anyone who might have a similar problem, not just op. If I'm not completely wrong, this also extends to meta. – DysphoricUnicorn Apr 3 '19 at 14:19
  • 8
    @Lundin correct, which is why this an inappropriate non-answer. – hobbs Apr 3 '19 at 14:19
  • @Lundin Why does matter that it is tagged support? Do you think that support questions should be one time questions that will be discarded when they are resolved, not useful for future visitors? – Pablo Apr 3 '19 at 14:19
  • 2
    @Pablo It means that the OP wants help with their specific, localized issue. If the outcome is something we can re-use in the future, that's great. If not, that's fine too, as long as the answer is relevant to their support request. – Lundin Apr 3 '19 at 14:35
  • 18
    -1. Makes no attempt to answer the question. If you feel that strongly about the quality of the question you could downvote it and move on rather than call it trash in both this answer and other comments on this thread. – chevybow Apr 3 '19 at 14:43
  • 2
    Just because the question was close-worthy (as evidenced by the fact that it has been removed from the site) doesn't mean you should call the asker "trash". Please keep your civility about you, on main and meta. – NH. Apr 3 '19 at 15:14
  • 2
    @NH. Wow... trash refers to the contents, not the poster, obviously. If you find content rude for whatever reason, imagined or otherwise, flag it. [Removed rude and incorrect remarks –ed] – Lundin Apr 3 '19 at 16:13
  • I'm sorry I misunderstood what "trash" referred to. Thank you for removing it anyway. – NH. Apr 3 '19 at 16:26
  • 1
    @Lundin for the sake of transparency and fairness: This answer is being discussed on meta. – Script47 Apr 3 '19 at 20:03
  • 4
    I edited the flagged comment to remove the incorrect assertion that only diamond moderators are allowed to have opinions regarding the moderation of this site, which was couched in unnecessarily abusive language. While I agree with your answer, and what you meant by “trash” was quite clear to me, you were in the wrong to attack someone for criticizing your answer and/or language. The site is moderated by the community; that includes everyone, not just diamonds. We’re only there for when escalation is necessary. – Cody Gray Apr 3 '19 at 20:13

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