-31

I have noticed that sometimes people jump the gun on closing something as duplicate when it is not a duplicate. They reference answers that are 10 years old, relating to "legacy" technology. While questions may seem duplicated, a 10 year old answer without giving time for perspective doesn't provide the best answer. So, there should be more characteristics considered prior to closing something as duplicate; such as,

  1. Does the old answer allow for fresh perspective?

  2. Does the old answer reference technology that doesn't actually exist?

  3. Does the old answer reference specific technology that the new question does not reference?

  4. How much time has passed since the question was asked?

So, I'm recommending two things:

  1. A waiting period before closing something as a duplicate. Sometimes questions are closed as duplicate within minutes. At least wait "x" amount of time prior to closing something as a duplicate.

  2. If a post is 10 years old, and a new question is a duplicate, leave the new question open, and close the 10 year old answer as a duplicate. You may get new perspective on the fresh question, rather than referencing well dated questions and solutions.

Those two things would help keep it fresh in my opinion as Stack Overflow continues into the future in keeping up with modern thoughts and perspectives. Not giving time for a conversation, and using 10 year old answers may not keep people interested in those specific answers.

  • 6
    Re 2 - Nope. We want all the answers, regardless of age in one place. We can't do that with your suggestion. New perspective answers can still be placed on the old question. – Paulie_D Mar 27 at 13:16
  • 9
    Duplicate closing is not the end of the post, it can always be edited, improved, and reopened. And it doesn't matter if an 'old answer allow for fresh perspective', if you have a new, better answer to a question post that answer on that question. That's where it belongs, because we don't want people to have to go hunt through 20 different posts to find their answer. – Martijn Pieters Mar 27 at 13:16
  • Re 1 - Nope - If it's a duplicate, it's a duplicate - why wait? – Paulie_D Mar 27 at 13:17
  • @Paulie_D, sometimes when a question is rephrased it can stop being a duplicate question. That could be one reason. I have seen questions being closed too soon. It may discourage the OP to edit his post. – Webber Mar 27 at 13:18
  • Here is an example... stackoverflow.com/questions/619767/…. Very few people are going to go to that post and comment on something that is 10 years old relative to a new question stackoverflow.com/questions/55355913/… – user9105725 Mar 27 at 13:19
  • C# 3.5 isn't even a real technology. – user9105725 Mar 27 at 13:19
  • 4
    Anecdotally, a user in the php tag closed a question extremely quickly yesterday and I asked how they even knew where to look and they replied saying they had memorised the question ID because of the frequency that it was linked. A time based delay wouldn't necessarily prevent a dupe from being marked as a dupe, it'd just delay the inevitable. – Script47 Mar 27 at 13:26
  • Exactly, the best answer today isn't about how many clicks you got yesterday. Or 10 years ago. – user9105725 Mar 27 at 13:27
  • 4
    Sounds like the original just needs an edit, then. It's likely C# 3, with .NET 3.5. Or, perhaps, get rid of the version info entirely; I bet most answers aren't even for 3/3.5. – fbueckert Mar 27 at 13:27
  • 1
    Yes, original does need an edit, but if it is edited, does it make all the old answers still valid? That kind of stuff happens a lot. – user9105725 Mar 27 at 13:28
  • As long as you're not editing it to accept only more recent answers, but just removing the version info in the text, there's nothing there that would invalidate existing answers. If anything, it just makes it more clear that the question you're referring to is a dupe, and that you can add an answer for whatever version of C# you're using. – fbueckert Mar 27 at 13:31
  • "sometimes when a question is rephrased it can stop being a duplicate question." - Then if it's not a duplicate the OP has to explain why it's not...this is fundamental. Leaving it open helps no-one and closing signals the OP that it should be edited if necesary. – Paulie_D Mar 27 at 13:31
  • 7
    @Jesse So you posted an example of an old question and a newer version of it, but the answer on the new question does nothing but repeat answers on the canonical. It adds nothing new. The only problem with that question was that it wasn't closed as a duplicate before someone could just duplicate information (but poorly). Your example literally is evidence that we shouldn't do this. – Servy Mar 27 at 13:38
  • 5
    Thank you all for your time and feedback. I like the site and will continue to help those I can. – user9105725 Mar 27 at 13:45
  • It's much cleaner to mistakenly close a question as a dupe and then reopen it, than it is to leave it open for a while and have to deal with the duplicate answers. – TheWanderer Mar 27 at 16:46
12

A waiting period before closing something as a duplicate. Sometimes questions are closed as duplicate within minutes. At least wait "x" amount of time prior to closing something as a duplicate.

Anecdotally, a user in the tag closed a question extremely quickly yesterday and I enquired as to how they even knew where to look, the user replied saying they had memorised the question ID because of the frequency that it was linked.

A time-based delay wouldn't necessarily prevent a dupe from being marked as a dupe, it'd just delay the inevitable.

If a post is 10 years old, and a new question is a duplicate, leave the new question open, and close the 10 year old answer as a duplicate. You may get new perspective on the fresh question, rather than referencing well dated questions and solutions.

The point of the duplicates system is to amass all the information for a specific question in one centralized location. This makes finding, adding and clarifying easier for everyone involved. If you split duplicates based on time, the answers would get fragmented which sort of goes against the original point.

If you have a new answer to provide, feel free to do so, there is no time-based limitations regarding when you can/cannot post an answer.

Again, anecdotally, in the last couple of days, I've seen many questions, extremely old, get new answers posted on them in the (if memory serves right) and the tags. Sometimes, you just need to sort by 'active' to see them all.

If you feel your question is not a dupe, clarify why you feel that way, be factual and be clear.

  • A time based delay wouldn't necessarily prevent a dupe from being marked as a dupe, it'd just delay the inevitable. - Hopefully. Pragmatically, out of sight, out of mind, and now we've got multiple questions asking the same thing. – fbueckert Mar 27 at 13:34
  • 6
    The big thing a delay does is give people interested in earning reputation, rather than creating a repository of knowledge, the chance to post answers duplicating the canonical before it gets closed. Sadly, people tend to upvotes such answers, and rarely ever downvote them. Closing, while not a great defense to such posts, is all we really have. – Servy Mar 27 at 13:41
  • No one agrees, but I'll accept your answer. As a user, I will continue to ignore anything that is 10 years old. It's not practical to think that something 10 years old is the best answer while people, like me, were working a modern answer. But, it is what it is. I accept my defeat. – user9105725 Mar 27 at 13:43
  • @Servy I believe (maybe I'm wrong), more people would down-vote answers if they weren't penalised for it but I know that system is place to prevent abusing, a catch-22. – Script47 Mar 27 at 13:43
  • 1
    @Jesse 'As a user, I will continue to ignore anything that is 10 years old.' - As is your right to, I do hope no-one is forcing you to view them. 'It's not practical to think that someone 10 years old is the best answer while people, like me, were working a modern answer.' - No-one is saying rely on an old answer, we are saying rely on old question (if yours is a dupe) and view the answers there and if you can't find an answer, explain that in your dupe. Though, I'm not sure what age has to do with this. – Script47 Mar 27 at 13:45
  • 1
    @Script47 I'm sure more people would. I don't know if it would be enough. I also believe that the "prevent abuse" is overstated. Yes, it does prevent some, but my (unscientific) suspicion is that it prevents way more legitimate votes than illegitimate ones, making it a net harm. – Servy Mar 27 at 13:52
  • 6
    @Jesse As Script said, you're free to do that, but you're only hurting yourself. Programming languages and concepts change a lot less than a lot of the rhetoric would have you believe. The vast majority of 10 year old content is still very useful. Also, just because you want people to constantly repeat information over and over again because you don't trust existing content doesn't mean the site will change its whole design from being a repository of knowledge to a help desk just because you want it to. – Servy Mar 27 at 13:55
  • I understand. My question was just a recommendation. I’m not offended that recommendations get attacked, similar to how fast questions get closed, and I understand your viewpoints. I don’t share them, but that’s what makes us all human. As the recommendation doesn’t seem to sit well, I’ll be fine, you’ll be fine, the site will be fine. It’s all good. I don’t expect changes. – user9105725 Mar 27 at 13:58
  • 5
    they had memorised the question ID ... respect .. and we need a life ... – rene Mar 27 at 16:54
  • I found memorizing the title of the duplicates and just Googling them to be the more sane approach, but I guess just typing a memorized ID would be faster. – Carcigenicate Mar 28 at 14:18

You must log in to answer this question.