-9

Are

What is "charAt(i) - 'a'" means in Trie structure?

and

Java: Subtract '0' from char to get an int... why does this work?

duplicates?

I did not manage to find the second one easily using wording from the first (that is, I had to google 3 different things). The ideas are identical, but one can claim the details make them different enough that they should not be considered duplicates.

  • How are those "cross-language" duplicates? They're both tagged [java]. What am I missing? Your not being able to find the second one easily using the wording from the first is exactly what the duplicate mark is for. – Cody Gray Mar 25 at 7:20
  • @CodyGray You missinterpreted, I meant that since these questions exist on multiple languages, it might be good to create a single canonical. These questions just triggered the thought. I will clarify – kabanus Mar 25 at 7:21
  • By the way, I am trying to interpret the downvotes - do people disagree these are duplicates? – kabanus Mar 25 at 7:24
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    I wonder why you ask if these questions are duplicates. Your main concern is if it would make sense to create a cross-language reference for this "calculation" with chars which is then easier to find, so asking "if these are duplicates" is just distracting from that. I would remove that part to have a clearer question. " By the way, I am trying to interpret the downvotes - do people disagree these are duplicates?" Well, here you see the issue with having two questions in one post ... – Tom Mar 25 at 7:26
  • @Tom Actually, the first part was what I was unsure of. I will remove the general suggestion. I really was not sure if these are duplicates or not. – kabanus Mar 25 at 7:27
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    Uh, I downvoted because I obviously completely misinterpreted the question. You might consider rewriting the title. – Cody Gray Mar 25 at 7:27
  • @CodyGray Thanks, I made the question specific. I really wanted just narrow input whether these are close enough. I will leave big ideas for later/others. – kabanus Mar 25 at 7:28
  • 1
    If you still want to ask if a canonical question would make sense, then I would assume a new question would be better suited. Then you can relate the votes on the question directly to that topic. – Tom Mar 25 at 7:30
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    Don't ask A if you really meant B, especially on Meta. Also don't ask one thing in the title and another thing in the question body. You really meant to ask "Is it worth having a cross-language canonical for 'How to convert character to integer'?" (IMO: yes, great idea, do it!) rather than "Are these duplicates?" (They are pretty close, but frankly neither are great canonicals, so who cares. The first introduces needless context and code about Tries, the second asks "How does this work?" instead of simply "How to do this?"). Possibly those need retitling or a 3rd reasking to be a canonical. – smci Mar 25 at 8:02
  • @smci I am not sure what you mean. You posted 30 minutes after this question became very specific, and asked whether these are duplicates. That is exactly my question, so I do not really understand most of your comment. – kabanus Mar 25 at 8:11
  • Seriously though, are these? The votes indicate they are not, but the few people who comment say they are. – kabanus Mar 25 at 8:12
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    On Stack Overflow, "duplicate" means, "you can find the answer over here". Do these two questions have the same answer? This Meta question has become quite the chameleon, so you can no longer go by what the votes indicate. – Cody Gray Mar 25 at 8:13
  • @CodyGray I think they are more like "the answers here answer something very close to what you ask, and the connection is easily inferred". I wanted to know if this is still makes the original a valid dup-target. – kabanus Mar 25 at 8:15
  • @CodyGray Also I edited the question minutes after posting, seconds after your feedback. I really do not see how this is a chameleon. If anything, I made it simpler to discuss. – kabanus Mar 25 at 8:16
  • Ok if you're merely claiming/asking "The ideas are identical, but one can claim the details make them different...", then the former part of the claim is wrong, I already gave you my answer: "How does subtracting '0' from char to get int work?" is pretty much asking "What is ASCII code?" in every language which uses it to represent characters, which is most languages since the 1950s(?). It's not asking "How to convert char to int?", to which the simple answer is "Subtract '0' from the char value" ... – smci Mar 25 at 8:18
7

If you're claiming/asking "The ideas are identical, but one can claim the details make them different...", then the former part of the claim is wrong, because the questions ask distinct things:

  1. The general approach is "trick to convert an ASCII character into an integer index into an array (assuming it's guaranteed to be in-range)". Q2 is about subtracting '0' from char to get int (0..9) which is only meaningful on a character representing a digit; and Q1: subtracting 'a' from a char to get int (0..25) is only meaningful on a character representing a lowercase letter (anything else, e.g. 'b' - '0', '3' - 'a', 'A' - 'a' are meaningless unless you're into the internals of ASCII. But let's assume the input is sane).

  2. "How does subtracting '0' from char [representing a digit] to get int work?" is pretty much asking "What is ASCII code?" in every language which uses it to represent characters, which is most languages since the 1950s(?). [1]

    • It's not asking "How to convert char to int?", to which the simple answer is "Subtract '0' from the char value (assuming the char represents an integer)"
    • I don't think anyone cares deeper about why ASCII is laid out in the order it is (why the collating sequence it the way it is).
  3. But the first question ("What does "charAt(i) - 'a'" mean in Trie structure?") is slightly different (and more confusing) for several reasons:

    • charAt(i) is indexing into a string, rather than a single char.
    • The "in Trie structure" context is needlessly confusing, not necessary and unhelpful, it should be scrubbed from both the title and code example. The code example should simply read index = key.charAt(level) - 'a'; . Unless the question really meant "How do Tries work, oh and by the way, how does the key.charAt(level) - 'a'; trick work?" (In which case it's both badly-worded and def. not a duplicate.)
    • A third nuance is in Tries, there is conceptually also a string, but it's understood to come from concatenating the constituent letters of each node in the pointer chain, rather than just a simple string like s[0:n]. So, again, the code is not a great example for a canonical.

Originally revisions #1..4 of your Meta question also asked "Does it make sense to make a cross-language dup-target?".

  • But obviously we do not close Java askings into C answers, Python askings into Java answers. (for example the top answer on the Java question spends more time discussing Java annoyances like types, length, type coercion and unsignedness, than actually answering the question: "char's are actually of the same type / length as shorts... Because char is the same as short (although, an unsigned short), you can safely cast it to an int. And the casting is always done automatically if arithmetics are involved". These comments about type lengths are not even true for C, C++, Python (2 and 3). But anyway they're really distracting. So you need an asking that didn't have "Java: ..." embedded as the first word of the title, and answers that go light on language internals.
  • Really you meant to say "Is it worth having a cross-language canonical for 'How to convert character to integer in different programming languages'?" (In my opinion: yes, great idea, do it!) and "If yes, which of these should be canonical" to which my answer is "Neither, so who cares about arguing if these are duplicates; they're both bad material for a canonical, so just pick/post a third asking, to make a canonical." But hey, this is Meta, so you'll get people gleefully drive-by downvoting a not-very-useful discussion, rather than writing something that proposes the improvement...
  • So honestly please reinstate that part, the cross-language canonical suggestion is great, I support you.

Footnote:

[1] Very-strongly-typed languages like VHDL also use ASCII, but don't support '-' arithmetic operator on string types and thus the subtract trick for conversion to integer, that's why they're called Bondage & Discipline languages.

  • VHDL uses ISO-8859-1 and not ASCII which is a subset. A string literal (a lexical element) has a type defined by context and there are types that have "-" operators predefined for character enumerated array types, e.g. signed or unsigned in IEEE package numeric_bit or numeric_std. There are however no implicit type conversions between composite types and scalar types. There is a predefined attribute for returning the enumeration positional value of a character type value (an integer). The solution won't match other languages (other than Ada). – user1155120 Aug 9 at 19:38

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