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I have a task which I want to solve which I had thought was achievable using Java reflection.

The only respondant says it's not possible except my searching though the byte code of my app. It sounds reasonable enough but it's obviously not a solution I can test. So I left the question open and did not immediately accept the answer to possible attract further comments and answers.

Less than 6 hours have the answer was posted, a comment was added asking me to consider accepting the answer. A reasonable question but seemed a bit needy/greedy so I checked. This poster has used the same text c. 170 times in the last 2 years.

I'll admit to forgetting to accept some answers to my questions - especially if they are not easy to confirm. But a reminder to accept an answer after just 6 hours seems a bit OTT.

Does accepting an answer 'early' reduce the chances of the question coming to the attention of other people?

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    You never obliged to accept an answer. It's acceptable to flag such requests as no longer needed. – snakecharmerb Mar 20 at 13:58
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    You can accept the answer whenever you want. But a single reminder after 6 hours, if the answerer felt you had been engaged and read the answer and "resolved" your issue effectively, it's not "over the top", in my opinion. You can always flag the comment as NLN, it will be deleted. – yivi Mar 20 at 13:59
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    @yivi if the solution was testable then I would have no problem accepting the answer immediately. The problem here is that it was his expert opinion which obviously counts for something but is still not as definitive as I would have liked – paul Mar 20 at 14:03
  • What would convince you of "no", though? It's... kinda hard to test and prove a negative like that.... – Patrice Mar 20 at 14:09
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    You're never obliged to accept such an answer. If the answer doesn't convince you that such a task is actually unsolvable, I wouldn't accept it. Also, see Dealing with an answer that wasn't accepted. Current standing is you may only ask others to accept if you can assume that he/she doesn't know how to accept, asking in this situation is unreasonable. – Erik A Mar 20 at 14:09
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    Generally speaking, I feel a little disappointed when I write reasonable answers that remain eternally "pending", as if the user would've just gotten away with anything they wanted without giving nothing in return, so I might relate a little with that request. That said, I don't think the user is in any position to urge you to accept his answer, considering that only 6 hours have passed. But even after months, I'd still feel like asking for a general courtesy would be rude. – Davide Vitali Mar 20 at 14:15
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    "This poster has used the same text c. 170 times in the last 2 years." That seems like a very flaggable case. – Cerbrus Mar 20 at 14:16
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    You are not obliged to accept answers at all, ever... but you do have more than a couple of questions where you never accepted any answer. :P – yivi Mar 20 at 14:24
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    @yivi yikes!!! I didn't know this little trick. Very informative... – Davide Vitali Mar 20 at 14:31
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    @yivi Note that in many cases the author of the answer and question are the same. Just checked for myself and found one of those too, I blame the required 2 day wait period on accepting self-answers. – Erik A Mar 20 at 14:36
  • @Erik Yeah, I was just having a bit of harmless fun. I still believe it's the asker prerogative when to accept or if to accept at all. But since we are in "etiquette" territory and not about hard-rules, just seemed curiously appropriate. – yivi Mar 20 at 14:39
  • From related question meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/346593/… – Dijkgraaf Mar 20 at 17:51
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    Since one can offer bounty only after two days it's more than prudent to keep your answer open at the very least until you try such option. – PM 77-1 Mar 20 at 17:54
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    @smileycreations15 I'd rather not. My point is not to shame someone who tried to help me. If the consensus is that the person is behaving outside the norms then I'll say something to him directly, – paul Mar 20 at 19:12
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    @yivi You are quite right and I did mention in the original post that I am not as conscientious as I ought to be ;-) – paul Mar 20 at 19:15
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Completely, exhaustively and without remorse ignore such comments, and flag them as no longer needed. The only human who should decide what answer to accept, and when, is you.

If you see a pattern in a user's actions, you can also flag that, maybe a moderator will find this warrants a communication. Consistently trying to force users to accept one's answers is not a thing that is encouraged.

Don't get me wrong, it's not the same kind of offense than using sockpuppets to upvote your answers, but I totally agree with comment that "[...] it's noise at best, begging somewhat rudely at worst".

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    There's nothing wrong in that message either Agree to disagree there. I do think that asking other experienced users to accept your answer is wrong. I guess we don't have consensus on it, but it's noise at best, begging somewhat rudely at worst. – Erik A Mar 20 at 14:29
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    @ErikA especially after only 6 hours. You want to leave a short comment after 6 months in which the OP never followed up, I'd be a bit more willing brush that off. But after only 6 hours, seems like badgering no matter how friendly it is worded – psubsee2003 Mar 20 at 14:32
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    I have flagged a bunch of those comments as "No longer needed" and later a custom flag. All of those flags were automatically marked as "helpful". Those comments were all automatically remove. – Cerbrus Mar 20 at 14:34
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    @ErikA That will be a agree to agree actually, I've rephrased this somewhat. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Mar 20 at 14:42
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    OP you should consider accepting this answer ducks – Tas Mar 22 at 1:07
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Accept and up-vote the best answer that helped you solve the problem. Up-vote other helpful answers. That's all that matters.

As for how long you should wait before accepting, the site already has a timer in place, but it is ridiculously low, 15 minutes.

  • If you are only looking for an answer to the question and get one in short time, then by all means accept it whenever you like.
  • If you are looking for the best possible answer, and want as many gurus as possible to potentially answer, wait at least 24 hours - maybe several days up to a week.

You can always change which answer that is marked as accepted, if a better answer pops up late. However, accepting an answer early might supposedly discourage others from posting. (Though as it happens, all them gurus already got so much rep that they probably don't care.)

Leaving a comment prompting newbies to accept the best answer that helped them is fine and encouraged. But if you are partial, maybe refrain from posting such comments to your own answers.

If you truly care about teaching newbies how to use the site, while at the same time rewarding high quality answers, post such comments below good answers written by other users - that's a genuinely good thing to do.

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    "Leaving a comment prompting newbies to accept the best answer that helped them is fine and encouraged." I am unsure what you are talking about. Encouraged by who? Not by the sites guidelines it isn't. Not by the users either, comments to that effect get deleted almost instantly. The site's rules and ways are generally explained in the help center, the encouraged thing to do is letting people read that. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Mar 21 at 15:42
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    @FélixGagnon-Grenier It is quite common that we have newbies that don't understand the accept mechanics. Asking question after question but never accepting any answers, because they aren't even aware that it is expected. Such newbies need a nudge in the right direction through a comment, but perhaps not by someone who is partial and self-promoting. – Lundin Mar 21 at 16:06
  • Yeah, I can get behind that. Encouraging accepting answers of others after a certain timeframe is definitely more acceptable than doing the same for one's own answer, for some reason. But it gets hariry because at the same time, they may also be fully aware of the mechanics, and have good reason not to accept an answer. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Mar 21 at 16:50
  • I've definitely left the comment and I think it often should be left when a new user comments on a single answer: "Thanks, this solved my problem." – Justin Mar 22 at 17:04

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