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This question already has an answer here:

I'm not going to be providing any links to the questions here, but just wondered what people's thoughts were.

I've noticed recently that a user has been asking a lot of linked questions on the same subject over the last couple of months or so. These questions themselves aren't bad at all, in fact they are often good questions; they provide samples of their data, describe and show what their goal is and often show their attempt (even if it is is way off the mark). Often they will get an answer, and upvotes, and I think that the well structured format of their questions should be upvoted.

What I do wonder about is that, to me, the fact that they need to be asking question after question for the system, goal, application they are using strikes me as if they are almost effectively getting "free consultancy work" from the volunteers of Stack Overflow. Some of the more complex questions they ask require a lot of thought, and time of the users and those end up with more of a discussion initially. A couple have been deleted since as really the answer was "someone needs to look more closely at your system and that's not really possible for us (Stack Overflow users)".

Is there a limit to how many questions a user should be asking about the same topic? Even if there isn't, is it ok to suggest that perhaps it's time for the user to hire someone, as the complexity continues to escalate and they do appear to be out of the depth.

Perhaps the user is an "Accidental DBA", and yes they do need support, but should that support be coming from Stack Overflow or should they be looking for someone to sit down with, and look at the bigger picture. Something I think is really important from those asking questions here (on Stack Overflow, not Meta) is that the user understands the answer(s) they are given. If they accept that answer then they need to be able to support that answer in the future. If they don't understand the answer, should they be using it? Possibly not, but if they don't understand it they should be taking the time to by asking questions in the comments of the answer, should they not?

In the end, maybe the reason they need they have so many questions is because of a flawed design, and someone with a high level of knowledge of the software they use could do them a world of good. It seems harsh to push someone away, however, from asking questions on Stack Overflow when clearly their questions are good well formulated questions, but (from my view) it does seem they could benefit far more from a real person rather than the volunteers here.

marked as duplicate by EJoshuaS, Sam Hanley, Arun Vinoth, Stephen Rauch, il_raffa Mar 21 at 18:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    Related on MSE: Using SO to complete whole project – Josh Caswell Mar 18 at 19:43
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    Well, from my experience of such "nanny me through please" kind or questions tend to be either far too trivial, way too broad or much too specific. It's really hard to tell without any examples. I can understand why you don't want to fingerpoint to some specific links. May be you can create some pseudo-exemplaries to show what kind of repeated closely related questions you mean. – πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 18 at 19:46
  • I'll see what I can do @πάνταῥεῖ to try and give examples later. I must admit that normally, yes one would expect a "help me complete this project" question series to be a string of low quality questions, but this isn't the case, and is why I don't want to "fingerpoint" the user. – Larnu Mar 18 at 19:49
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    @Larnu "but this isn't the case" I think that its natural that an OP trying to accomplish their task / project with help of asking questions at SO might produce VLQ questions and also questions with sufficient quality. Maybe we should leave them a comment that it would be good etiquette to link their follow up questions to the original ones. When there are such follow up questions appear in comments (which is often the case for VLQ questions with answers), we usually advise to ask a new quesiton (which might tend to be better quality than the previous one). – πάντα ῥεῖ Mar 18 at 19:58
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    SO-driven development is a time honored tradition after all. – yivi Mar 18 at 20:42
  • Relevant answer to a different question: meta.stackoverflow.com/a/261593/1394393 – jpmc26 Mar 19 at 23:13
  • We definitely shouldn't nit pick about the level of benefit a user is getting, whether 1 question at a time, or getting help building an entire system, because that will only lead down the not-nice slope of telling most users to just "go figure it out yourself". I personally mastered programing by learning to debug complicated problems myself. I learned how to search books before mastering how to properly utilize the internet/web, but I can't preach that from my SO soapbox and still be nice. If they build a system by playing the right game on SO to get upvotes, then move on and let it be. – C Perkins Mar 20 at 6:18
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  • Intentionally spamming the site with the same or similar questions over and over again is grounds for suspension. – EJoshuaS Mar 21 at 17:01
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These questions themselves aren't bad at all, in fact they are often good questions

Great!

But...

Some of the more complex questions they ask require ... more of a discussion initially. A couple have been deleted since as really the answer was "someone needs to look more closely at your system and that's not really possible for us (Stack Overflow users)".

These ones don't sound like good questions.

The solution is simply to judge the questions independently of the asker or their asking history, and vote on them based upon their usefulness to future readers - just like you'd do if they were asked by anyone else.

  • I disagree. If the second type are frequent, then something needs to happen. Not sure what. Flag for moderators to discuss with them? Ask them to post a Meta? Dunno. – jpmc26 Mar 19 at 23:15
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    @jpmc26 If the user is having a significant number of their questions downvoted, closed, and/or deleted, or if they're deleting their questions themselves, the problem should solve itself. – duskwuff Mar 20 at 5:49
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    @jpmc26 Nothing is inherently wrong with a complicated, challenging question. If the question contains all of the other "necessary" components of a good question, then one can't expect all questions to be answerable immediately without some additional back and forth...at least to start with. Many programmers, myself included, love programming for the challenge and I actually enjoy answering a "real stumper" on SO as along as it fits within all the other proper conditions. These are definitely better than the simplistic newbie question were it's obvious that no effort has been invested. – C Perkins Mar 20 at 6:25
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    I'd say as long as each question is self contained, and you don't need additional history from previous questions in order to properly answer it, it should be allowed. Sure, they're treating SO as a one stop shop to complete their project, and that's annoying, but we gotta look at the bigger picture; do these questions help build our repository of knowledge? – fbueckert Mar 21 at 13:10
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I think they behave according to the rules here. There is nothing wrong with it, even the tour says so.

enter image description here

Some of what you mentioned

Some of the more complex questions they ask require a lot of thought, and time of the users and those end up with more of a discussion initially.

may fall into the generate discussion though so this kind of question is discouraged.

What I do wonder about is that, to me, the fact that they need to be asking question after question for the system, goal, application they are using strikes me as if they are almost effectively getting "free consultancy work" from the volunteers of Stack Overflow.

Isn't that what we, volunteers, signed up for?

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    I wouldn't say we signed up to Stack Overflow to be free consultants, no. Some users very much sign up to Stack Overflow to only ask questions, and give very few to no answers back 9but that isn't the point of my post here). There's a difference between asking questions to the community on a single problem you've been having, and then asking lots of questions which lead on, or closely relate to each other. For the first they are often in solitude, and can be answered with some sample and expected behaviour. Cont... – Larnu Mar 20 at 12:49
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    well crap, my browser crashed and I lost my comment I was typing... /facepalm – Larnu Mar 20 at 12:51
  • On the other hand, if the user needs to ask a string of related questions, then the volunteers that know their system, by reading the other questions, will be abhle to make a much more informed answer, but that means they need to spend time to learn their system; is a question that requires (or significantly benefits from) knowledge of the OP's own environment on topic, even if the question itself is about programming, and could be replicated to a minor degree? Probably. But having to learn the OP's system/environment blends a set of question to consultancy, in my view. – Larnu Mar 20 at 12:55
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If the questions:

  • are not dupes of each other,
  • are not dupes of already existing questions,
  • are clear, well-formulated,
  • are comprehensible independently,
  • show individually their own research,
  • ... and all other rules are also fulfilled,

Then they are obviously very welcome. Such a question is not a problem on the Stack Exchange network, it is an important resource. Anybody capable of asking such questions is welcome and an important member of the community.

If this is not the case, then they should be dealt with as usual.

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I think that if they are asking many, multiple questions on, say homework for school, then yes seeing that these serial questions usually happen to be super specific on just one little thing, they are just posting their code and not trying anything at all themselves, and they are not good questions at all. More like something suited for a help forum rather than a quality content-based community.

Now, if you are talking about good quality questions, then in that case I don't think there is anything wrong. Sure, if they are using SO to do all their coding project, that is their own problem, not a problem for SO as it is more good quality content for the site.

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    But my point here is that they aren't low quality. – Larnu Mar 18 at 20:15
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    I can't see any wrong with this answer. It has some politician flavor, i.e. it works so hardly to not insult anybody, that it is hard to decode from the result, what it really wants to say. However, this work was successful, and there is imho no problem with this answer. I see no reason to vote it down. The MSO is not very nice. Your other 2 answers are deleted now and I can't see them. – peterh Mar 19 at 22:57
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    @peterh Welcome to META. You do not grasp how voting one META is different from voting on SO. On meta we vote to show agreement/disagreement - on SO we vote an answers quality. This answer was disagreed by 11 people and 5 people agreed with it. A negative score on META does not tell you this is bad it simply shows how the community thinks about it. Scores on META also do not influence your reputation on meta. If you disagree heartedly, leave a comment or answer your own to make your position to the OP clear. – Patrick Artner Mar 20 at 6:28
  • ohtheironing.jpg. I love it ^ – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Mar 21 at 17:03

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