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I don't answer questions much because I don't have a firm grasp on the popular tools in programming used today. So I gain reputation mostly through editing questions on SO. For example, I turn HTML, CSS, and JavaScript into snippets. Or I fix the grammar and clarify. Anything to improve the quality of the question. Is it bad that I am doing this?

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    I wouldn't say it's bad. Once you reach 500 edits (1k reputation), you won't get any more reputation for editing. – Aniket G Mar 16 at 2:49
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    You're only making edits a few times a month. Feel free to make edits more often if you want. – BSMP Mar 16 at 4:14
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    I love it when my questions or answers get a good edit. Thanks for what you are doing. As far as answering questions, when I finally solve a particularly hard problem in my code that I hadn't been able to find a good answer to on SO, I add a new and better answer to an old question. Or I make a Q&A pair if it didn't exist. This helps me to learn and other people find them helpful to. – Suragch Mar 17 at 3:45
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    Gaining reputation from editing questions – that's the system at work. If your edits were rejected, you wouldn't be gaining rep. But they're approved, which implies that the community largely approves of your fixes and tells us that you are improving the quality of SO. That's not bad at all. :-) – TrebledJ Mar 17 at 11:51
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    editing was my main source for reputation a long time... since I never had questions nor answers but wanted to be able to up-/downvote. – Mischa Mar 18 at 8:34
  • Take a look at Shog9's research into edit behaviour. – Michael Mar 18 at 16:49
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You're contributing by editing, specially since your edits need approval and they seem to be getting it.

You'll find out that after 500 edits you're not going to be able to gain rep because there's an edit reputation cap at 1000 rep (more in: How do suggested edits work?), but you can continue. If your edits are good, they'll keep being accepted. The site has already taken this limit into account, so you're not abusing at all.

So keep doing that, until you find something to answer eventually. Maybe you'll be able to answer more questions in the future, because your professional activity will make you progress by trainings/assignments.

Lurking on the site a little while before trying to answer doesn't hurt, and helps to create good posts (I see that you already answered 25+ questions which is already a good answering contribution, so don't be too hard on yourself).

  • My answers only helped -1 to 2 people, so they don't seem that helpful. And same with my questions. – Marvin Mar 16 at 23:01
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    you had 2 votes, but maybe some other people found it who can't vote or aren't registered on the site. One upvote is already good. – Jean-François Fabre Mar 16 at 23:02
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    @Marvin, in my experience, only answers to very common problems get tons of upvotes, and there aren't a lot of common problems left to solve. Your answer history looks great to me. – Sinjai Mar 18 at 16:41
  • @Sinjai and Jean-Francois Fabre thanks. – Marvin May 12 at 22:07
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As long as your edits are comprehensive, correct, virtually helping the OPs, then it's not discouraged.
Actually we like these kind of edits in review.
Just, maybe not too dense.

However, I do believe some of us think tag-only edits are discouraged.
Especially when several people are keep removing tags, and a few others are keep adding tags.

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    Tag-only edits are only discouraged if there's other improvement areas IIRC. As in if the post is filled with formatting issues and grammatical errors, fixing a tagging issue isn't comprehensive enough for <2k users, especially because it requires review before the remaining issues can be fixed – Zoe Mar 17 at 11:27
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It's completely ok, and also encouraged.

However, there are some things you should think about.

Please don't make very small edits, unless they are necessary. For instance, avoid editing a post just to change one occurrence of "its" to "it's" even if it is more correct. The reason is that every time you do that, a few other users need to approve your edit. It's simply not really worth it. Save such edits until you have 2k reputation and you can edit without others approval.

Avoid editing very bad questions. If it's obvious that a question will be deleted (lots of down votes are a good indication) then avoid editing it. That is, unless you can make the question good. But don't waste reviewers time on a question that will be deleted anyway.

Avoid editing closed questions, unless your edit make it suitable for reopening. When you edit it, it will be placed in the reopen queue, and reviewers has to spend time analyzing if it should be reopened. This applies even for 2k users.

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Definitely not discouraged, more the opposite, very encouraged.

The reason reputation is awarded anyway is because edits that are accepted are a positive contribution. So, if you are gaining lots of reputation from making edits, then that shows you are doing good work and contributing positively by making an edit that is accepted by the reviewers.

However, make sure that your edits are meaningful. Don't just change one small thing, make it meaningful and positive, something reviewers will look on postively.

Therefore, keep on going, edit away (as long as they are meaningful, positive edits!), at least until you hit 500 edits where you no longer gain reputation.

Check this post out, along with others to gain more understanding if you would like.

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