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I had trouble getting an answer to the question of "What % male is SO?". Thanks to a helpful comment, the answer is that we are 93% male.

On the one hand, I find it heartwarming how consistently people say "Gender doesn't matter to us here", "We're a meritocracy" and "On the Internet, no one knows you're a dog."

On the other hand, it's concerning that the industry of professional programmers overall is about 2.5x-4x as likely to be female as we are.

(Different industry estimates I found put the percent of female programmers at 17-25%.)

I'm not asking if it's right or wrong to be one way or the other. I'm not asking if or what should be done about it. I'm not asking if an individual's gender matters or not. I'm not asking about process; I'm asking about the current state.

I'm simply asking, at a very high level, are we okay with the current state of being 93% male?

closed as primarily opinion-based by default locale, Jan Doggen, Jeremy Visser, HaveNoDisplayName, S.L. Barth - Reinstate Monica Mar 15 at 11:35

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 6
    That's just the small portion of SO users that responded to the survey. Who's to say how accurate that is compared to SO's actual users? – Cerbrus Mar 12 at 18:46
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    Sorry, Are we ok is simply a poll, not a discussion. If you have proposals to improve open participation by women, then I'm all for having a discussion about that instead. – Martijn Pieters Mar 12 at 18:46
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    Besides, participating in the developer survey does not equal participating on Stack Overflow, we don't know what percentage of users here are male or female. And it doesn't actually matter, because we care about content. Content is genderless. Of course, with a narrower base, we also get a narrower set of solutions, with diversity we gain a more diverse perspective, and that's a pity, but again, that's not what appears to be the discussion you frame. – Martijn Pieters Mar 12 at 18:47
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    I do not answer demographic questions like Gender/Race in the survey. You don't have to answer. Maybe the non-male genders disproportionately Decline those questions? We need more data. – user1596138 Mar 12 at 18:52
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    @Jhawins: Good luck getting that data from people who refuse to answer such questions :D – Cerbrus Mar 12 at 18:54
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    You're correct. There's not enough women here. Let's force them to come to this site. That'll surely help in making them feel welcome and valued. (ok, I'm done with sarcasm) Why don't we just.... you know... not pay attention to it, and let the cards fall where they may? – Patrice Mar 12 at 19:22
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    This seems like one of those questions where the comments under the question will quickly become a steaming pile of quips and terse opinions because it takes a long time to write a thoughtful answer. So... Before posting a comment here, maybe think twice about whether you have something that needs to be said - and if you decide that you do, take the time to flesh out the idea in an answer instead. – Shog9 Mar 12 at 19:26
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    What's your goal behind your last two question? why is it important to have equality in male/female on the site And why it's important to know if a person is a male or a female? What if we have Aliens participating on the site? if they provide good content then we are fine, let's have them. The most important thing is that they speak english. – Temani Afif Mar 12 at 19:26
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    This has been temporarily locked to stop the war over closing and deleting. The community team has seen fit to keep it here, so we will stick with that decision for the time being. Before people argue, decisions like this have been made in the past. – Yvette Colomb Mar 13 at 14:13
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    I must say that ClimbsRocks persistence (despite downvotes) is bring interesting content/answers and insights from staff to meta. Thanks! – Petter Friberg Mar 13 at 18:12
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    @MartijnPieters at first sight it does not matter I would agree, because it does not on a singular Q or A, but reading the answers, considering the overall benefits for SO, are we sure? – Petter Friberg Mar 13 at 20:05
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    @AaronHall: Why have you closed this as POB? Isn't practically any meta [discussion] based on opinion? At least that's what the tag wiki says... This specific one has been answered by 2 moderators too. – user000001 Mar 14 at 17:50
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    @user000001 Maybe because the collection of opinions we will get in reponse to this are only that: a bunch of opinions. There is not follow up on why we care for those opinions. That would make this question and its answer no better than a Youtube or Twitter stream. – Jan Doggen Mar 15 at 9:26
  • What does "okay" mean - individually or collectively? If the gender balance is more skewed on the site than it is in the industry (which, in turn, is more skewed than in the population) then that likely raises some valid questions. That's fine. Let's try to figure it out. But I'm not sure what it would accomplish if I decided not to be "okay." It sounds well-intentioned, but it's not healthy. If I decided not to be okay because of this, then really I should just never be okay again, ever. We can try to make the world a better place and be okay. – Scott Hannen Jul 3 at 14:01
41

Why is the poster's personal information even something worth mentioning? Why do we care? Why should we care? The question is based on an assumption that this disparity is a self-evident problem that SO must solve, and does nothing to back it up.

An excerpt from a previous answer:

And now here's the real question: Why does who posted it matter?

We're trying to be user agnostic. Nothing should be happening due to who posts something.

We're supposed to be about the content. We vote and curate content. If you're curating based on user information, we call that a misuse of the curation process, and that does a disservice to building a repository of knowledge.

How is our gender breakdown at all relevant to good content? What if we're 93% Groots (I really like my Groot examples), somehow managing to type better than we speak? Would that matter? Should it matter?

I for one welcome our treant-y overlords.

  • 16
    It's not about judging content. The concern is that the reason SO's demo doesn't match the real world demo is because something about the site design, user interactions, or gamification is tuned to be stickier or easier to use for some groups more than others. We can fix that by seeing what people who don't like the site say causes them to not use it and finding a way that makes the site seem more interesting/rewarding to them... and being sure that won't negatively impact the site quality at the same time. – Catija Mar 12 at 20:12
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    Unfortunately trying to get an "exit survey" on users that don't stick around may prove to be a lot of effort for minimal results. – Sterling Archer Mar 12 at 20:13
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    Do you really need one, @SterlingArcher ? I talk to my husband and he tells me plenty about why he doesn't post on SO... and his coworkers are happy to tell me, too. They're all engineers who visit the site daily and yet they only consume the info, they don't ever post and they have some ... outlandish ideas about how the site works. They're very intelligent and capable programmers but they're afraid to use the site for various reasons or confused about how the site works... there are more of them than there are of us, so finding them is easy! – Catija Mar 12 at 20:15
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    @Catija sorry, let me try to rephrase that, maybe I wrote it poorly. In my experience as a dev and user, I have never enjoyed (and rarely answer) "how was your site experience". My comment was more meant to focus on the difficulty harnessing these ideas and opinions from "non-regular" users, and how the amount of effort put into harnessing such data may more than likely yield deflating results. I hope I'm conveying my thoughts well here lol – Sterling Archer Mar 12 at 20:19
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    @SterlingArcher Sure! I understand what you're saying. What I'm saying is that... people who I know seem very happy to tell me all about their experiences on SO. Now, maybe that's because they're my husband's coworkers but I don't necessarily think so. Regardless, we're a site with millions of daily viewers so getting a couple hundred (thousand?) to fill out a survey and a dozen or two to talk with us in a focus group isn't that difficult... and even if it were, being difficult isn't a reason not to try if we honestly think we can make the site better. – Catija Mar 12 at 20:22
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    @Catija All this tells me is that SE has a product problem. None of it seems to actually be something we, as users, have any say in. I don't deny we have a new user onboarding issue, as figuring out the rules and learning tends to be on Dwarf Fortress levels of difficulty. I'm just having trouble figuring out how working this out publicly is at all useful; SE's gonna do what SE's gonna do, no matter how strongly the community is against it. – fbueckert Mar 12 at 20:22
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    @Catija you know what, that's extremely well put. Thanks! I have basically no physical friends/people in the Tech industry so that's more input than I can achieve lol – Sterling Archer Mar 12 at 20:24
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    @fbueckert Yep. And that's what Sara's saying in her answer... which is being downvoted, unfortunately. We see that it's a problem and we want to work on it. It's OK for users to ask about that and for us to answer. But you do have a say. We're working on many changes to the network that have benefits for both existing users and new ones. Y'all have been discussing things we can fix for years and we're starting to work on those things. Sure, not everything will help everyone, but that doesn't make them bad. – Catija Mar 12 at 20:30
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    @Catija Call me pessimistic, but I honestly don't feel I'm heard. SE has exhausted their trust bank, and now you need to rebuild that if you want to regain any traction with the community. We've been hearing for months about how good things are happening, with very little to actually show for it. HNQ was it's own debacle that contributed to that trust deficit, so, at best, that's a wash. – fbueckert Mar 12 at 20:35
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    Eh, the HNQ was a long-standing problem that we waited too long to address. Some of those FRs are 3-5 years old. We know that we have a lot to make up for and we want to really make substantial changes that y'all can really see... we're playing the long game and we're focused on making public Q&A better - and part of that is making it an easier place for people to succeed, both in asking and answering questions. I know I'm just another voice saying that but I'm a new voice. ;) I have big dreams for the next 9 months and the next 2-3 years after that. – Catija Mar 12 at 20:44
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    @Catija In the immortal words of Jerry Maguire: "Show me the money". Years of neglect can't be made up by knocking out one or two easy requests, especially ones we've mentioned for years. How SE handles this question going forward is going to be very telling, for me at least, about what sort of voice this community actually has. – fbueckert Mar 12 at 20:48
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    So, there are a couple of ways to approach that sort of "exit survey", @SterlingArcher. Badgering people with pop-ups is... one way. A terrible, infuriating-bordering-on-harassment way, but a way none the less. An alternate approach is to ask folks when they're taking some action: for years, folks sent us commentary when asking for their accounts to be deleted, because we didn't have a self-service system for that - they really only had to type, "please delete my account", but some would send pages of commentary anyway. We don't offer that option for self-service deletion, but we could... – Shog9 Mar 12 at 21:09
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    @fbueckert "The question is based on an assumption that this disparity is a self-evident problem that SO must solve, and does nothing to back it up." - I really am curious if the community sees this as a problem or not. There are plenty of very successful sites and companies that intentionally appeal primarily to either men or women. I'm curious to see if SO is one of those or not. – ClimbsRocks Mar 12 at 21:46
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    If we are targeting men and women equally, and we attract women at a rate that's notably lower than we'd expect based on industry employment stats, that seems like a major missed opportunity. If we're ok consolidating our position amongst men, because men make up the largest part of the market, that's a valid answer itself, and leaves explicit room for someone to create a version of SO targeted towards women. – ClimbsRocks Mar 12 at 21:47
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    @ClimbsRocks I think you're missing a lot of the history and context that's been part of this inclusion discussion for the last year or so. Ever since the welcoming blog debacle, curators have felt...uneasy about the direction SE is going, and the later fiascos only helped to continue whittling away at the support SE has enjoyed. It's likely not what you meant to happen, but this question seems to continue feeding into that debate, and most curators are...pretty exhausted by the whole thing now. I know that's how I read your question, and I doubt I'm the only one. – fbueckert Mar 12 at 23:14
13

Even if that statistic holds up to the number of users who did not answer the survey.

At a high level, I'm ok with this because I do what I can to advocate exposure to my female friends. What it comes down to, is we can't hold a gun to women's heads (figuratively of course) and force them into a field they don't want to join. (edit: this doesn't just apply to women, but everybody)

All we can do is expose STEM fields, help people, and hope that ALL PEOPLE get involved in technology.

So yes. I'm ok with StackOverflow being 93% (skewed) male because we got to that number without blocking women's access or inclusivity in the site.

  • 4
    I think this answer misses the notion of implicit biases and invisible privilege or gender roles that apply (admittedly, largely outside of the site, but still) that might contribute to our current percentage breakdown. Stack Overflow was founded by two brogrammers, so it was biased against women's inclusivity from the very beginning. Stuff has changed to fix that over the years (and some stuff has made it worse), but I think the overall balance has never tipped in favor of women (or gotten to an even keel). – TylerH Mar 13 at 16:25
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    @TylerH Contrary to popular belief, women don't need special invitations to participate anywhere ;) We don't need pink flowers sprinkled all over the place, nor "Women are welcome here" banners. The fact that two men founded SO has no impact whatsoever. – Dalija Prasnikar Mar 13 at 16:38
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    @DalijaPrasnikar reductio ad absurdum will not win the day here. Likewise, the argument of 'it doesn't affect me so it must not affect anyone else' has been thoroughly debunked. There are myriad inherent/unconscious biases that play into everything people do (see Julia's comments under Sara's answer for a quick, excellent example). It's great that you feel comfortable participating on Stack Overflow; you're one of the lucky 7%. Please don't let that convince you that we shouldn't try to increase that percentage. – TylerH Mar 13 at 18:28
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    @TylerH This is XY problem. Those that find it hard to participate for any reason, will convince themselves that this is because they are women, because of their race, because they don't speak perfect English, because they are newbies or whatever. What they feel is real, problem is that their feelings are not proof of objective fact of what really happened. The more you try to solve their "imaginary" problem the more real problems you create because others belonging to "abused group" will be reluctant to participate in the first place. – Dalija Prasnikar Mar 13 at 19:22
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    @DalijaPrasnikar No, your attributing a cause without any evidence across the board. That's... terrible practice. The only way you can learn about why women or people in general don't participate here is to ask them, which the company is doing. You shouldn't smother the efforts of others to better understand and level the playing field. – TylerH Mar 13 at 19:32
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    @TylerH Company (SO) is wasting time trying to solve the wrong problem. We all know what is the real problem - poor content, lack of tools and resources to deal with that content promptly, and new users that are not properly educated how to use this site. Rules here are harsh and they are not clearly presented from the start to new users. Besides that there is absolutely no reason why some particular group of people (like women) would have harder time here than the others. – Dalija Prasnikar Mar 14 at 8:23
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    You cannot have quality assurance and warm, cuddly and welcoming place at the same time. No matter what you do, every down vote, every close vote, every comment (no matter how polite and nice) asking to improve question (or the answer) will be seen as not welcoming by receiving party.. – Dalija Prasnikar Mar 14 at 8:25
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    @DalijaPrasnikar no one is wanting warm and cuddly, please do not place pejorative inferences on the welcoming efforts. You can be nice and have high quality assurance. Being rude doesn't ensure high quality of anything. In fact it ensures many people will be turned away and possibly/probably reduce the quality. People wanting a quick answer will risk rudeness, the account is disposable. People wanting to build a relationship with the site will walk away. Our loss, not theirs. – Yvette Colomb Mar 14 at 15:21
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    I like the effort here, but it falls apart in capturing the greater issues of the problem itself. This answer touches upon the complexity of the problem and how we're getting in the way meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/380437/… – Yvette Colomb Mar 14 at 15:25
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    @YvetteColomb I am not against being nice. But people are conflating nice with not down voting and close voting their poor content. I said "warm and cuddly" to emphasize difference between quality moderated site and site that allows anything as long as people are absolutely nice to each other. – Dalija Prasnikar Mar 14 at 15:51
  • @YvetteColomb You don't have to look far to know what I am talking about Comments asking for clarification or an MCVE are not rude/abusive – Dalija Prasnikar Mar 14 at 15:54
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    @DalijaPrasnikar again you are taking things out of context. The fact that some people use flags incorrectly, the fact some new users are not nice and we don't want that behaviour on the site, doesn't mean we can't be nice or ignore rudeness and deal with it expediently with the ample tools we have to deal with that type of behaviour. Trust me, your logic in this argument is slightly flawed. I'm trying to be frank, as it trips up most of the people who object to this type of discussion. We are discussing A and B. People throw up C, X, Y and Z to argue against it. – Yvette Colomb Mar 14 at 15:58
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    @DalijaPrasnikar "You cannot have quality assurance and warm, cuddly and welcoming place at the same time" Yes, you can have QA with a warm and inviting place, though I admit it requires more than a basic understanding of communication, which a lot of programmers seem incapable of moving beyond. – TylerH Mar 14 at 17:41
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    @TylerH If we could stop flood of extremely poor content or have ability to fight it promptly we could more easily help people willing to follow the rules to successfully do so. It is hard to be nice when you are frustrated. Of course, this is not an excuse... more an explanation. – Dalija Prasnikar Mar 14 at 17:54
-8

Just posting my ten cents, this answer is half-experience based half-speculation, make of it what you will

No, I don't think we should be okay with this

Stack Overflow is, in essence, a knowledge base, and it shouldn't really matter who posts an answer or a question. However, due to the sheer magnitude of Stack Overflow, beginning programmers, including non-members, will probably read posts here a lot.

These posts are clearly associated with someone's identity, and that someone most often either doesn't clearly identify with a gender, or identifies with a male gender.

If someone identifies as female, this can create a feeling of not fitting in, which makes it harder for them to contribute to the site, but could even influence their image of the programming industry as a whole and probably influence things as job decision.

Unfortunately, part of the problem is a loop: we have an image of being mostly male, leading to females getting a feeling of not fitting in, leading us to staying mostly male.

However, it is what it is. I don't think we discriminate, exclude, or otherwise actively discourage females from participating, so we can't change the demographic by addressing that.

I think that we should be open and constructive when people suggest feasible approaches to address this difference. However, I think that addressing this difference will be very, very hard.

  • 4
    Is user123xxx male or female? Is user behind some pseudonym male or female... is user forced to present with real name... can user be whatever he/she wants... there are zero obstacles for females to participate here. The only reason females can jump to the wrong conclusion that they are not welcome here is because so many meta posts and official blogs are concerned about female participation. If there is a smoke there must be a fire, right? – Dalija Prasnikar Mar 14 at 11:37
  • @DalijaPrasnikar Please consider re-reading my answer. For example, I say that someone most often either doesn't clearly identify with a gender, or identifies with a male gender and I don't think we discriminate, exclude, or otherwise actively discourage females from participating. I don't see how your comment applies to my answer. It's a question of feeling you don't fit in, not being discriminated for your gender. – Erik A Mar 14 at 11:40
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    How can you feel that you don't fit in, when every second user's name is userxxx? – Dalija Prasnikar Mar 14 at 11:43
  • @DalijaPrasnikar Your username is wholly unrelated to how you identify, and if you feel you fit in. Even more, an environment where you feel like you can't represent your true identity can lead to you feeling like you don't fit in. – Erik A Mar 14 at 11:45
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    Currently asked front page questions - 5 female names, 18 males, the rest is not identifiable... I don't see any problems here... – Dalija Prasnikar Mar 14 at 11:52
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    Also this whole thing starts from the wrong premise that females are somehow very fragile beings and that we need special considerations. No we don't. – Dalija Prasnikar Mar 14 at 11:53
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    If you disagree with the premise that we have an image of being mostly male, there's not much to talk about. That premise is core to this question and explained there, so I don't think it needs substantiating in my answer or the comments. – Erik A Mar 14 at 12:19
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    It is not the question whether this site is really male or not. But how can you come to the conclusion that it is, and thus feel that you don't fit in? It is only by reading posts like this, where this is explicitly said. Ignore posts on meta and official blog and you will not get that picture. And if you start participating with good content, you will not have any troubles because you are female or will subsequently feel that you don't fit in because of your gender. – Dalija Prasnikar Mar 14 at 12:24
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    If for someone gender distribution is relevant for their feeling there is absolutely nothing we can do nor we should. You either have people abusing "their feelings" for their own agenda or people that have genuine problems - but solving those problems is beyond our reach. This place is as gender/race/whatever.. neutral as it can be. It has all provisions in place, flagging and moderation, to prevent real abuse. Doing anything more will do nothing for those that have "feelings" problems it will only make things more stressful for everyone else. – Dalija Prasnikar Mar 14 at 12:45
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    I love this answer. I don't understand why there is such resistance to addressing this issue. It's particularly baffling when women are against it. It's almost like. "I made it, why can't you". We're not all as persistent as others. – Yvette Colomb Mar 14 at 15:17
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    @YvetteColomb that's an interesting perspective, but devil's advocate -- is the notion of persistence related to gender? – Sterling Archer Mar 14 at 15:26
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    @YvetteColomb Picture this: person standing on the busy street looking at the empty sky pretending something is there. Soon enough you will have groups of people around looking at the sky pointing at something and nodding to each other as there is something actually there. It is not that I am saying if I can make it, then others can, too. I am saying there is nothing to see here. And more talking about "women" having problem on SO will result in more women being reluctant to participate because there is problem with women participating. – Dalija Prasnikar Mar 14 at 16:00
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    @YvetteColomb I don't want to get you wrong. Are you saying that you had problems participating here because you are woman? Did you have personal bad experience? Or you just perceived it that way? In community this large it is expected that there are people here that are racist, sexist, abusive in general. But isolated incidents never represent community as a whole. I have never ever experienced, nor I have seen collective abuse based on someone's gender or race here. For me that is what counts. – Dalija Prasnikar Mar 14 at 17:46
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    As far as under representation of some groups. You cannot really know that. SO allows anonymity, so it may as well be that those 93% male is completely wrong number. I am not saying it is so... but it is real possibility that numbers lie. – Dalija Prasnikar Mar 14 at 17:48
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    @DalijaPrasnikar I have had issues. Yes. But it's not limited to SO. As you say and I fully agree, SO is a microcosm of the rest of the world. There's still inappropriate things going on the site from time to time. The bigger issue is the mentality. It needs to change and I fully agree with your comment elsewhere. If we had the tools to clean up the crap easily a lot of the frustration would subside. I do understand. I get angry when I see some of the low qual stuff posted and some of the attitude. The point is, the welcoming drive is not for them. The distinction needs to be drawn. – Yvette Colomb Mar 14 at 20:00
-14

I've put together my comments under these answers to write a somewhat disjointed answer, but at least it will pull the ideas into one searchable place.

But we curate content not people, why should it matter?

In response to fbueckert's answer.

We're trying to be user agnostic. Nothing should be happening due to who posts something.

The real issue is, We are people. Everyone know our highest ranking user is a man, in fact a browse of our highest ranking users reveals their gender, and if it is not apparent it doesn't take much to work out who they are in real life. Yes, content is curated on quality, but the site is made up of a community and each person in that community does have an identity. Even if they keep it anonymous.

No one is saying we should vote because of the author. I'm saying people are often aware of the authors and some people use their profiles as part of their resumes.

But we don't block women's access on the site, so what's the problem?

In response to Sterling Archer's answer.

So yes. I'm ok with StackOverflow being 93% (skewed) male because we got to that number without blocking women's access or inclusivity in the site.

I like the effort here, but it falls apart in capturing the greater issues of the problem itself. This answer touches upon the complexity of the problem and how we're getting in the way. The site clearly has issues with inclusivity or we'd have community numbers more closely representative of the programming community.

Taking things out of context

In response to this comment:

You cannot have quality assurance and warm, cuddly and welcoming place at the same time. No matter what you do, every down vote, every close vote, every comment (no matter how polite and nice) asking to improve question (or the answer) will be seen as not welcoming by receiving party.

No one is wanting warm and cuddly, please do not place pejorative inferences on the welcoming efforts. You can be nice and have high quality assurance. Being rude doesn't ensure high quality of anything. In fact it ensures many people will be turned away and possibly/probably reduce the quality. People wanting a quick answer will risk rudeness, the account is disposable. People wanting to build a relationship with the site will walk away. Our loss and the programming community's loss, and theirs.

Taking things out of context. The fact that some people use flags incorrectly, the fact some new users are not nice and we don't want that behaviour on the site, doesn't mean we can't be nice or ignore rudeness and deal with it expediently with the ample tools we have to deal with that type of behaviour. This type of logic in this argument is slightly flawed. It trips up most of the people who object to this type of discussion. We are discussing A and B. People throw up C, X, Y and Z to argue against it

If we cannot allow people to discuss this, how can we fix it?

In response to Erik A's answer and the resistance to it.

I love this answer. I don't understand why there is such resistance to addressing this issue. It's particularly baffling when women are against it. It's almost like. "I made it, why can't you". We're not all as persistent as others.

There's no easy fix. One thing's for sure, if we didn't get knee jerk reactions against open discussion about it, we'd be over half way there. If we're battling to even discuss it, that's the biggest problem. For each person who rallies against the discussion it reveals a lot about themselves. Why not want a discussion? No one is trying to harm the site. We want to include more people, people who may contribute really good stuff. As I said the vampires don't care, they will dispose of the account, it's the long term users we are losing.

But why should we fix it?

The site recently went through a high user attrition rate. If we clearly know that some groups are underrepresented, we better find out why and work to remedy that. Knowing the largest Q&A programming website is not equitable is a huge problem. The reasons are complex and not all SO's fault, but we still need to evaluate consciously and deliberately why this is happening. This helps everyone and I don't understand why people are so resistant to this. It's a little sickening tbh. It lacks empathy or ability to think beyond one's own experiences.

But I can't see a problem and all talking about it will do is create one

In response to this comment:

Picture this: person standing on the busy street looking at the empty sky pretending something is there. Soon enough you will have groups of people around looking at the sky pointing at something and nodding to each other as there is something actually there. It is not that I am saying if I can make it, then others can, too. I am saying there is nothing to see here. And more talking about "women" having problem on SO will result in more women being reluctant to participate because there is problem with women participating

This is the argument many people make and what I implore people to realise. Just because you cannot see it, it doesn't mean it's not there. It's clearly not a problem for you. It is possible that it may be a problem for other people? It has been a problem for me over the years. I see a problem and so do other people, women and men. The biggest issue we have fighting issues like this, is people brushing over them. It's like saying racism doesn't exist because apartheid has stopped, so people should stop complaining. The issues are far more complex.

There is a problem. Many women do not like participating on the site.

So who's problem is it anyway?

  1. If women, or anyone has problems with participating on the site it's that person's problem and the site's problem.

  2. As a site we need to evaluate, do we miss this person participating?

An entitled new user with no contributions who abuses people at the drop of the hat and is not willing to change? No we don't want them.

A programmer who is capable of forming a long term relationship with the site and becoming a positive contributor, but doesn't because they are intimidated and/or disgusted by the site? Yes. We do miss that participation.

With diversity of users brings diversity of content

The more richly diverse our community is, the more richly diverse our content will be. There's people who think outside the box, inventive, creative coders who are not coming to this site, because of its reputation and experience for many new users. I didn't enjoy being new here. I stayed through sheer force of will. Many people are not persistent to a point of almost masochism and will not stay. they have clear boundaries and are turned off by a lot of what has gone on here historically. This cannot be made clearer.

What has this welcoming thing achieved anyway?

It's improved the site and continues to do so. The site is gradually heading in the direction of inclusivity. (Need Shog to get some stats out)

Now to the next person who says "why should we pander to new people who make no effort?".

No one is saying pander to anyone. We're saying, can we mature as a site and have discussions about broader issues that are affecting the programming community as a whole that is reflected in this site.

We are having a discussion. If you strongly object to it, I urge you to hide some meta tags, as it's a discussion that is not going away.

But meta doesn't want this discussion

Do not mistake meta support for an opinion being righteous. There is a silent majority who browses the site and does not vote.The people advocating for change are doing so for these people and the benefit of everyone already on the site. It's just the people objecting cannot see this.

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    As long as people will continue making sexist and gendered associations in their minds between faces, hair, body shapes, interests and genders, we will continue going nowhere with all this. The very premises of most reflexions on that topic, from OP to SE staff, are gendered. As long as people don't fix their own gendered, sexist binary visions of users, and to a larger extent, human behaviour, I don't believe we'll go anywhere. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Mar 14 at 16:59
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    I feel you're simplifying my position and strawmanning it to give you something to attack. I object to the discussion, and can still see the problem. Never doubt that. People use the site. Nobody is disputing that in any sense. What I'm disputing is the constructiveness of even having the discussion. Disagree with that if you like, but don't make it sound like I don't see the issue. – fbueckert Mar 14 at 17:05
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    I think that crux of your answer and the answer you linked is "many people don't like this site, many are reluctant to participate - including while males". I know that first hand because I personally know a lot of them. This is the problem that needs to be solved. But it will go nowhere if we push women and non white people under the bus. There is no need to specifically name particular groups because problem is not in particular related to them. – Dalija Prasnikar Mar 14 at 18:08
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Thanks for your question, @ClimbsRocks. I'm an engineering manager here at Stack Overflow and I reopened it so I could add an answer.

We value the Stack Overflow community enormously, but we very much are not okay with how this community doesn't reflect the demographics of the broader software industry, not to mention society as a whole. The low proportions of women and certain minorities is concerning to us. One thing that we didn't think about when we put together our founding team is, "Will we end up making a product that only is appealing to people like us?"

It's something we think about a lot now and I wish I could sit here and tell you exactly what is causing it and exactly how we will fix it.

We don't know all of that yet, but we're working on it. We do know it starts with talking to the people that don't sign up for an account because posting a question on Stack Overflow "scares them" (this is a quote from a developer from an underrepresented group I interviewed recently), or they don't think they have anything valuable to add. Over the next few years we plan to address this through adding new features, revisiting old assumptions, and iterating on feedback both from within and outside our existing community.

Why are we not okay with this?

Just like the internet is the largest recording of human history ever made, Stack Overflow is the largest knowledge base about software development to date. We don't yet know the implications of this being created by folks from a limited demographic background but there may be large consequences down the road. It's possible some have already occurred.

One of my favorite examples of this is the issues with women vomiting in VR. If there had been more women that were part of the design process, there would have been a lot less money wasted on the fix post release. Now, thank goodness that Stack Overflow isn't making women vomit (I hope); however, there is valuable wisdom being lost by not having a more diverse group of users.

We're working to change that. If there are actionable ways of approaching it we haven't thought of, we're all ears. Thanks for bringing it up.

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    I'm not sure if comparing a gender physiological action to accurately presenting information derived from documentation makes too much sense to me. Could you explain to me how the foundation of Stack Overflow has lost valuable wisdom from a females perspective? (this is a genuine question) – Sterling Archer Mar 12 at 20:10
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    In my post I say "we don't yet know the consequences". – Sara Chipps Mar 12 at 20:17
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    Maybe women are just less prone to fall for hunting imaginary internet points? I wish sometimes I were less prone too. – ead Mar 12 at 20:26
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    @ead That's actually an interesting point to bring up in this context specifically. Intense gamification itself was an early choice with a lot of consequences. Research (not-SO-specific) shows that gamification has differential impact on users; it tends to improve the performance of boys and men but not girls and women. – Julia Silge Mar 12 at 20:41
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    Here is one focusing on schools: dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2695664.2695752 – Julia Silge Mar 12 at 20:47
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    Here is one focusing on the workplace: researchgate.net/publication/… – Julia Silge Mar 12 at 20:47
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    "but we very much are not okay with how this community doesn't reflect the demographics of the broader software industry". To me, this highlights a rather important aspect of this I hadn't seen before. Most of the rhetoric I've seen around this topic have been around the expectation that SO's demographic should be 50:50. while that may be a goal of the whole industry to strive for over decades, it's not a... "problem" or indication that SO itself has a problem. However, if you instead compare our ratios to the industry, we are off by a few percentage points, which again, might not be a ... – Kevin B Mar 12 at 21:52
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    ... problem, but it could be an indicator that a problem exists, that there's some reason that more men are interested in taking part in this community compared to women. I think if this whole conversation was squared on that idea, things would be a whole lot more constructive. – Kevin B Mar 12 at 21:52
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    @KevinB precisely. What surprised me is that the industry has 2-4x higher female participation than SO does. I wasn't at all surprised to see we weren't close to 50:50, but I was surprised to see we had significantly less female participation than the industry overall. – ClimbsRocks Mar 12 at 21:57
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    Which, might not be due to the community or SO's structure at all. i just don’t want us to jump to conclusions and implement solutions when we don’t even know what the problem is. – Kevin B Mar 12 at 22:05
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    So... @KevinB I've been hanging around on MSO (before I worked here) specifically to follow the discussions about this stuff and I am curious where you got the 50:50 impression because I didn't get that, personally. It'd certainly be odd for a product for event planners to expect 50:50 gender usage but they'd probably want to make sure that their product attracted something around the 80:20 split they do have. bostonglobe.com/metro/2017/03/06/… – Catija Mar 13 at 4:05
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    I can't thank you enough for writing this answer. It makes me want to weep with relief. – Yvette Colomb Mar 13 at 14:32
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    ... it's interesting to note that, not a single time in that vomit thing, have anyone bothered to verify if there's a physiological explanation about this. Can testosterone have a limiting effect on motion sickness? Can oestrogene amplify it? We'll never know, because we're way too busy blaming the people who make things. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Mar 13 at 17:57
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    @FélixGagnon-Grenier no one is complaining about the physiology of the users. the criticism is that the issue was an avoidable problem. That rightfully sits in the maker's court. Same thing with unit tests vs integration tests; both are important. By the way, we actually do know, because there have been numerous tests and studies done. Luckily reality isn't a zero-sum game like you describe. – TylerH Mar 13 at 18:35
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    "I reopened it so I could add an answer"... oh boy – Berriel Sep 30 at 8:51

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