-11

This question already has an answer here:

I came to the scenario where I have suggested an edit) to an answer after the author of question accepted the answer.

But the old answer shows what to do, and I changed it with how you should do that and created code as per the question demands.

I prefer Stack Overflow is for coding Q&A and as if someone gets the same problem then they can google and view the existing answer for the question they are having. So, I edited that answer regardless of award points which are already assigned to the one who answered.

As we all know to only focus on the accepted answer for a particular question. But, my answer changed the whole answer, so a moderator rejected it.

I feel if the answer is what is required by the author of the question and the entity who submitted an answer selected as Correct feels an edit is valid then it should be allowed regardless of transfer of points.

marked as duplicate by Dejan.S, yivi, HaveNoDisplayName, Lundin discussion Feb 26 at 11:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

15

I spotted your suggested edit to the answer and rejected it. It appeared that your edit was trying to build on the answer which Dejan.S posted to add more details.

In this instance, as you were making substantial changes I rejected your edit using the built-in reason

This edit was intended to address the author of the post and makes no sense as an edit. It should have been written as a comment or an answer.

What I think you should have done in this instance was to post a new answer containing your edits (which I see that you have done), but link to the original answer which you tried to edit so that Dejan.S still gets credit for helping you to get to your answer.

See, e.g. "Is it appropriate to edit best answer's solution with improvement or add another answer?" - the answer by Servy says (emphasis mine):

If you're going to make non-trivial changes to someone else's code you really shouldn't edit their answer. If they just left off a parenthesis or semicolon then feel free to edit it in, but if you're going to re-structure it, change the coding style, or "improve" it in any way that you feel is meaningful, (and the post isn't already community wiki) then an edit would be in appropriate. If you just want to point out that something won't work, or that it could be improved, then a comment would be fine.

If the changes are significant enough that it couldn't reasonably fit into a comment, then chances are it's significant enough that you should be posting another answer.

Make sure that if you're posting an answer that's based on someone else's code you link to that answer and attribute the original author as appropriate.


A smaller, but still present, reason that I rejected the edit was because you added

Happy Coding ☻

to the end of the answer - greetings and 'fluff' should be removed from answers, not added. See, e.g. "Should 'Hi', 'thanks', taglines, and salutations be removed from posts?" where the consensus is to not have 'fluff' in posts.

  • And I did said , I agree with you for that matter and removed that part. – Monkey D. Luffy Feb 27 at 14:03
7

Well, you removed all of my comments and my experience that I put in the code. You should remember that the answer is mine and you are free to correct typos, fix links and basic stuff like that.

In your case, you have your own experience and opinions and you are free to make a new answer so that the OP has the possibility to choose. Your example was OK, but your answer lacks what I believe proper explanation and uses some bad practices.

This is what I mean:

  1. You do not state that styling the scrollbar is partial support and not supported at all in Edge for instance. Use caniuse.com for these kinds of things.

  2. Your naming of the classes is bad practice and can and will collide with others. This is what I mean with "the experience that I put in the code". Please remember I'm not in any way making any assumption that you don't have experience. I'm just saying I put my experience in there.

    Just being more responsible might be the right word instead, like what type of answers do we leave for whomever might come after and look at them. Give hints on what are good practices. It's not all about posting quick and hoping to be first and collecting points

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .