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Please see the list of edits I have done in the last two days:

My edits in the last two days, that have been rejected

(Note: Elaboration of some of the failed edits, in the link above, are already discussed in one of the answers to this question, where the same pattern of failure is repeated again and again.)

Thus I have found out more answers.

So it seems there is a lot for me to learn before proceeding to further edits after a lot of failures.

I have also seen this post during my edit ban: For how long I am banned for edits?

This post proves that the rejection is also about preventing bad behavior and bad practices until you are aware of it. Burnination leads to mass editing, and if not done with proper research, it has a drastic effect. So one has to prepare for a permanent ban if the failures are becoming unacceptably numerous.


Things that I have inferred till now :

Seeking Resolutions For The Common Problems While Editing The Posts

I have tried to improve the look of the questions or answers, emphasizing on the keywords, such that it grabs attention (even if the tags are already there), to see whether a post conveys the intentions/efforts clearly, and then it is properly understood.

In the process, by looking at the rejected edits, I have learned:

  1. The real use of quotations (just quote from the external sources or evidence),
  2. Links with labels (not always necessary, but it looks clean and describes the context of the place it will take you to),
  3. Code wrapper (for pieces of code or programming language keywords only),
  4. Bold and italicized words to emphasize a sentence that describes a problem or words that relate to the jargon of the language (if used incorrectly, it may impact the readability of the question).
  5. For the numbered lists and bulleted lists, this is the best example, because, in earlier stages of this post, the readability was bizarre. So you can explain your problem point by point.
  6. You can divide your post into sections using horizontal rule.
  7. You can try two different sizes of the text: header and normal.

The most common review comment is:

This edit does not make the post even a little bit easier to read, easier to find, more accurate or more accessible. Changes are either completely superfluous or actively harm readability.

I need to understand, in what ways, the grammatical corrections, and other suggestions, ended up in the reviews like that of the above, and others?

(Note: I have realized that it is not necessary to edit a sentence if the grammar is still correct enough to convey its intent properly. Only unnecessary portions of the post should be removed.)


WHAT TO LOOK FOR WHILE EDITING A POST AND TO MAKE AWARE TO THE POST OWNER HOW TO ASK A QUESTION

Putting my inferences till now:

  • No need to edit the post if, in spite of grammar, it conveys what it wants to.
  • If the post is still not conveying what it wants to, even when the structure is good, and the details are not put in, you can down-vote, flag to close with a comment that more efforts are needed by the question owner him/herself to improve the post.
  • Often there are sentences that are not useful to the post. These may be removed.
  • There may be issues of improper formatting.
  • If there are unrelated questions within the same post, then you can edit out to remove the question and suggest the post owner, that the post can be asked as a separate question in SOW.
  • The post owner should be careful in arguments with the contributors and moderators. He/she should not become adamant that he/she is doing good, even when reputed peers are advising that something he/she is doing is wrong.
  • You can flag or remove dead source links in the post.

For StackOverFlow:

Is your question about programming?

We prefer questions that can be answered, not just discussed.

Provide details. Share your research.

If your question is about this website, ask it on meta (here) instead.

Hence the rejection of the above question in the link was correct.

With the help of the solutions I get, I can improve past and future suggestions edits.

  • 1
    You can edit the info in if you like but I've changed the link for the time being to go to your suggestions tab on your profile, which contains the same general info. – Catija Feb 26 at 5:38
  • 19
    Overusing emphasis is not a good thing. Do use it sparingly. – Peter Mortensen Feb 26 at 7:30
  • It looks like you are trying to convert your question into some sort of "editing tutorial"... – yivi Feb 26 at 11:19
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    Please, remove unnecessary formatting. Caps lock is yelling, that title makes no sense for the post (your question already has a title and that title reads like the start of a FAQ entry), and no need to bold out a link. Also, I tried to fix the spotty grammar for your title, which you rolled back (!). Since you seem to be having problems having your edits accepted, I'd pay attention to other users trying to help you out here. – yivi Feb 26 at 11:51
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    Abhinav, your latest edit just inserts a new question into an already answered question. You need to move on from this Q&A. If you want to make a question about a specific edit, post a new question. Feel free to refer/link to this one if you think is pertinent. – yivi Mar 11 at 9:18
  • I checked. It's not. Your question has been asked and answered. Now you are inserting a link to newly rejected edit suggestion attempting to link it to a very specific suggestion in one of the answers. – yivi Mar 11 at 9:21
8

You have quite a high reject ratio to your suggested edits, so it is a very good thing that you reach out on meta like this. Since your intention is no doubt to do good and improve the site.

Strictly speaking, the edit policy can be summarized as: edits that improve the readability or chance to find a post should be approved, the rest should be rejected.

Naturally, edits that makes the post less readable or harder to find, or completely change the meaning will be rejected. But this also goes for edits that neither improve the question nor make it worse - they are simply superfluous.

After checking several of your recent edits:

The most important part is that edits should be substantial and correct all found problems with the post. To edit a fully understandable post just to make a few grammar corrections or a bit of emphasis is too minor an edit. It doesn't make the post easier to find or understand - it just creates extra pointless work for edit reviewers.

Edits should avoid to make radical changes to the contents. Instead, the proper way is to address the OP of the question with a comment, telling them what you believe should be fixed.

Worse yet is to edit post just to add seemingly random emphasis to nouns here and there. This is an easy way to get one self review-banned, as it adds nothing of value, makes the post worse and harder to read (it just looks weird), and it will create lots of work for everyone who has to go back and undo the "helpful" edits with rollbacks.

  • There exists almost no situation where bold formatting should be used for emphasis, a few valid cases being headlines and when the OP wants to emphasize the actual question in a long post.

  • Code formatting should never be used for emphasis, it should only be used for source code and identifiers (such as function or variable names). Names of technologies or products are not code. Random technical terms are not code.

    It is also fine to add code formatting to things like logs or console input/output, where the Courier font will make things much easier to read.

  • As you say, quote formatting should only be used when actually quoting someone else.

And overall, be extra careful when making grammar/spelling corrections if you aren't comfortable with written English. I'm not a native English-speaker myself, so I've been there too. Enabling an English spelling/grammar checker in the web browser is a great help.

  • 2
    For a really extreme example see your post at stackoverflow.com/questions/51186270/… - it is >70 in bold face, so that formatting doesn't serve any purpose since it can't emphasize anything in that flood of bf. – piet.t Feb 26 at 13:23
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I would have rejected the following edits for the following reasons:

https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/22280833

Orig: I would recommend you rollback to previous Gradle version.

Edit: I would recommend you to rollback to a previous Gradle version.

The first "to" does not belong there, "I would recommend you rollback to a previous Gradle version" sounds more natural. I think it's technically grammatically correct, but it doesn't sound natural. Hence reject reason "Changes are either completely superfluous or actively harm readability."

https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/22279848

Orig: I googled but couldn't get anything! Please help

Edit: I tried searching on Google but couldn't find anything worth helpful! Please help:

"Worth helpful" is not proper grammar. Again, "Changes are either completely superfluous or actively harm readability."

https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/22279837

Don't resubmit the same edit if it gets rejected.

https://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/22279806

Orig: If you are migrated for AndroidX and getting this error, you need to set the compile SDK to Android 9.0 (API level 28) or higher

Edit: If you are migrating to AndroidX and getting this error, you need to set the compile SDK to Android 9.0 (API level 28) or higher.

Unnecessary boldface makes it harder to read. Again, "Changes are either completely superfluous or actively harm readability."


I'm not going to keep going through the edits because there's a running theme, your edits seem to be superfluous or harm the readability. When editing, you should fix all (or reasonably most) problems with the post, and not introduce new ones.

  • 9
    Re: “I googled”. I would mention that the proper edit there is to mostly get rid of most of that, since it adds nothing useful to the question. The “please help” at the very least. – yivi Feb 26 at 5:40
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    @AbhinavSaxena Both American English and UK English are appropriate, however, try to maintain whatever the original author was using. (For example, if an author uses the British spelling of Colour, don't change that to Color, nor vice-versa.) – Davy M went to fund Monica Feb 26 at 5:55
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    Really just remove "searched alot" text - there is zero value in it... I search a lot too... Most of the time I get cute kittens as result... – Alexei Levenkov Feb 26 at 7:59
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    @AbhinavSaxena You may want to lessen the use of "Sir". While it is occasionally apparent whether a user is male, one should be careful of making assumptions about gender. There is little reason to use an honorific like "Sir" on Stack Overflow as we're all equal in the eyes of the Compiler :). – Heretic Monkey Feb 26 at 17:44
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    For the first example, you still have the grammar wrong. It should be: “roll back to a previous version”. “Roll” and “back” are two separate words; the verb is “roll”. “Rollback” is a noun. And for what it’s worth, “recommend [you] to...” is the grammatical form; the “to” just gets elided in common speech. Consider “you are advised to…”. You clearly cannot elide the “to” there. These are parallel constructs. – Cody Gray Feb 26 at 20:52
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    @CodyGray Well that's funny, Oxford has "Rollback" listed as a verb, but Webster specifies that they should be two separate words. I'd lean more towards Webster's definition though, I'm sure you're right. If I were to edit it, I probably would have chosen a different operative word than "to" such as "I would recommend that you roll back..." I noted that it is probably grammatically correct to use "to", but it really does not sound natural as the edit suggested. – Davy M went to fund Monica Feb 26 at 21:40
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    Mmm you made me curious so I started looking, it looks like the "I verb [that] you verb" is actually a subjunctive clause in English. In the present subjunctive, the followup verb is conjugated, and using "you to roll back" is infinitive, so the word "to" does not belong. The word "that" is optional, although recommended, but "to" is not correct there. – Davy M went to fund Monica Feb 26 at 21:48
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    Or on second thought; it looks like both are right, because recommend is also one of the verbs (along with advise) that permit the use of the verb followed by a direct object and a to-infinitive form, so it can also follow that rule and use the infinitive there instead of using present subjunctive. So both would be appropriate. Voy a regresar a mi hermoso español, ya odio el inglés. – Davy M went to fund Monica Feb 26 at 21:58
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    @DavyM: The suggestion is not grammatically correct. It doesn't fall into the category of "verb followed by a direct object and infinitive". Note that in the original, you is not an object of the verb recommend at all, it's the subject in a dependent phrase "you rollback...." In the modification to use an infinitive, you needs to become an indirect object "I recommend to you". Compare to the verb advise, where the receiver is a direct object, and I advise you to rollback ... is perfectly grammatical and sounds correct to boot. – Ben Voigt Feb 28 at 15:52

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