-10

I answered this question:

How to make thread sleep for 1 day?

My answer was:

You can make a Windows Task to run your application by delay

It actually has 6 upvotes and 0 downvotes

A moderator deleted it, and linked this:

https://stackoverflow.com/help/deleted-answers

I still can't see why my answer was deleted, considering it was the right answer to the question and other users seem to think the same thing I do

  • 1
    @yivi its not about the voting... I am not sure of the delete reason here. Only the Mod can answer that – Suraj Rao Feb 25 at 10:17
  • @Suraj I didn't want to imply the deletion was because of the voting pattern. I'm just surprised about how well received the post was. – yivi Feb 25 at 10:18
  • 2
    My gut feeling tells me your answer was deleted with the "exact duplicates of other answers" reason. The one remaining answer also mentions using a Windows Task, but it was posted 3 minutes later than yours. – user247702 Feb 25 at 10:26
  • 15
    Just note that a high number of upvotes doesn't make an answer immune to deletion whataver the reason is – Temani Afif Feb 25 at 10:26
23

I handled a not an answer flag on the post. Yes it was an answer, but a low quality answer.

You can make a Windows Task to run your application by delay

At best it was a comment. It gives no clues or detail about how to do this. It serves no real purpose on a programming site, to assist in programming. Give some more details when you're writing a solution. Occasionally one line answers are suitable, but they're the exception not the rule.

Also what you wrote, was also mentioned as part of another answer. There's no need to have two answers saying the same thing.

Also, there's other deleted answers under the post. Two other self-deleted answer and another mod deleted link only answer.

On another note, I'm actually baffled it received 6 upvotes in such a short time. Having 6 upvotes doesn't make it a good answer. Sorry.

  • 20
    Forgive me if I seem a little baffled by this - The mods have historically been pretty in-your-face about warning us not to flag (but instead downvote) low quality "answers" that technically are answers, but now you come and say it was close enough. Is this a sign that it would be ok for us to start flagging these kinds of short, vague answers as NAA or VLQ? – Robert Columbia Feb 25 at 10:57
  • 6
    @RobertColumbia that's really hard to answer. People don't want low quality stuff on the site, and a good way to remove stuff is by flagging. To be completely honest, I've never agreed with not deleting low grade answers off the site, just because they offer "some type of answer" no matter how little effort is given to them. But I have to abide by the site's rules. Also this answer was duplicated in another answer. Not copied, they were posted around the same time. – Yvette Colomb Feb 25 at 11:03
  • 14
    I want to note that this not only was short and low-quality, but also didn't answer the question. The question was specific about wanting to suspend a thread for a day, which is a pretty specific question. The answer didn't tell the author how to suspend a thread for a day, but only told him to do something else, with no explanation of how to do that something else. The upvotes on the answer are probably suspending a thread for that long is ridiculous, just rerun the program votes, but in some situations (e.g. if you need to persist variables in memory) that's not feasible. – Erik A Feb 25 at 11:06
  • 1
    Thanks @Erik I was a bit surprised nobody mentioned that. The answer not only was low-quality, highly upvoted, that repeated what another more complete answer already said... it simply didn't attempt to address explicit question at all. As in... it's really hard to defend "we want to preserve this for future visitors". And because of the reception it got, getting help from a mod to handle this exception seemed like a appropriate way to go. – yivi Feb 25 at 11:08
  • @yivi - I wanted to say it's like saying "water is wet". That's the equivalent of how I read that answer, but as an answer it sounds insulting for me to say that. In the comments discussion, less so. – Yvette Colomb Feb 25 at 11:09
  • 5
    I think you overstepped your bounds here. Yes it was a low quality answer, but we use voting for that, we do not have moderators delete such content. You may have a point if the answer was posted later than the other answer you link to, but that's not the case, the answer you deleted was posted earlier. – user247702 Feb 25 at 11:35
  • 2
    @Stijn If the answer were to be downvoted (enough), it could have been deleted by the community, sooner or later. It was not, but nobody is saying that the answer is of good quality or useful. Moderator bounds include situations like these exactly because they are exceptions: keeping this content on the site is not useful, but sometimes the community's votes do not necessary align with the good of the site. – yivi Feb 25 at 11:41
  • 1
    @ErikA but "doesn't answer the question" actually means "doesn't answer a question". – Robert Columbia Feb 25 at 11:42
  • 3
    @RobertColumbia I'm just saying this doesn't answer the question. I'm not saying it would've been a valid NAA flag according to previous guidance (because we indeed have previous guidance that says this should've been okay). I'm certainly glad it was deleted, Use Windows Task is very close to You should totally drop that and try jQuery (which also is a valid answer according to current guidance). – Erik A Feb 25 at 11:47
  • @ErikA it has been closed as a duplicate now, go take a look at the duplicate target and its answers... – user247702 Feb 25 at 11:48
  • 17
    The extensive guidance on Meta tells you what types of things are safe to flag. You can flag whatever you want as “not an answer”, as long as you realize a moderator may disagree with you and your flag may be declined. Yvette absolutely didn’t “overstep” any bounds. This was a minimum-effort garbage answer at best, not to mention the fact that it didn’t even attempt to deal with the specific threading aspects of the question. The flag guidance is not intended to give a blank check to extremely low-quality posts to remain on the site. We still have quality standards. – Cody Gray Feb 25 at 11:55
  • 2
    @RobertColumbia There's no consensus historically or otherwise. There's the crap-hugging meta-lawyers who don't care about the actual content, only what the rules say. And then there's those who only care about the quality of the technical content. These two camps split meta and are endlessly debating. Even when something is deleted according to the rules, the debate pops up, people desperately looking for reasons to bring the crap back. – Lundin Feb 25 at 11:57
  • 7
    None of my objections to this “answer” are based on technical correctness, @Stijn. Technically speaking, using the scheduler is the correct solution; however, that does nothing to redeem this “answer”. Also, please don’t try and associate me with that foolish “doesn’t answer a question” metric, either. I’m going to delete a Perl answer to a C++ question every time. Notice that there is no problem when you post reasonable quality, relevant answers. I’m not going to have a funeral over this one. – Cody Gray Feb 25 at 12:50
  • 2
    Deleted in response to a NAA flag, @Andrew. If it had been deleted by the community in the Low Quality Posts review queue, it would list those users’ names under the answer. In this case, it is clearly deleted by a moderator. – Cody Gray Feb 25 at 16:08
  • 3
    What a refreshing breeze of common sense! – Josh Caswell Feb 25 at 17:14
11
  • It's not a proper answer for a programming question.
  • It's too short, so it will go into the review system and then get flagged by some users.
  • For the same reason, some high-rep users will vote to delete it.
  • The mods will deal with the flags, i.e., delete it.

Apart from the answer being off-topic, it's too short to be a proper answer. -- A good enough answer should have some details explained and some code added.

As for the upvotes, I guess they were actually seeing it as a joke, and those upvoters were amused. -- This kind of upvotes I've seen many times on Stack Overflow.

  • 2
    that's actually what I figured about the upvotes. Glad it wasn't just me who saw that. – Yvette Colomb Feb 25 at 11:11
  • 6
    The upvotes would make a whole discussion subject in itself. Considering that Tim losing his keys is often associated with downvotes, what exactly do we have here? Tim stealing other people's keys? – E_net4 Feb 25 at 11:23
  • How is the answer off-topic? – user247702 Feb 25 at 11:31
  • @Stijn Off-topic for the site at least, imho. And for the question too, I think. -- A SuperUser answer for a StackOverflow question. Anyway it's just my pov here and it's not the main reason. – Tiw Feb 25 at 11:37
  • 1
    Using the Task Scheduler as a programmer really isn't that far-fetched. The question has now been closed as a duplicate, and the answers for that one also recommend using the Task Scheduler. – user247702 Feb 25 at 11:39
  • 5
    "As for the upvotes, I guess they were actually seeing it as a joke, and those upvoters were amused. -- This kind of upvotes I've seen many times on SO": exactly: some people are so pissed at the question that they upvote any mocking answer or answer not really giving the solution. Sad. – Jean-François Fabre Feb 25 at 12:06
  • 2
    (Context for uninitiated: Tim losing his keys) – Peter Mortensen Feb 25 at 12:15
  • 2
    @Jean-François Fabre: Do we (now) have a term for it? Ironic upvotes? Sarcastic upvotes? – Peter Mortensen Feb 25 at 12:17
  • @Jean-FrançoisFabre ok but there isn't really much proof that this was happening here, there seems to be a real disagreement over whether this answer was on-topic or not. I can see why people would find the answer good because it advocates using what is already there rather than programming some hackish solution. In the end it is all for naught, the question is gone. – Gimby Feb 25 at 12:59

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .