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I raised a moderator-flag for this question, which was being (and still?) discussed on Meta.

I requested a moderator to lock the post since its content was disputed and was locked twice; see its revision history.

The content of the moderator flag is as follows:

While this question was locked and unlocked after some time, the content of the question is still disputed. A Community Manager (Shog9) reviewed the question (in the close vote queue) and selected 'Leave Open'. The review can be found here: https://stackoverflow.com/review/close/22199031. Please lock the post.

However, the flag was declined:

declined - flags should only be used to make moderators aware of content that requires their intervention

Why? The content of this question was disputed and I made moderators aware of it!

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    That particular canned reason is used because it's not clear to a moderator why your specific action needs to be handled by a mod specifically (i.e. it can be handled by normal user actions). But I don't see why that's the case here; it'd be great if we got insight from a mod to see why they thought so. (Could be that they didn't read past your link and didn't see the action you wanted them to take.) – gparyani Feb 16 at 19:57
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    It seems the issue is already resolved though. Why do we need a lock? – ayhan Feb 16 at 21:01
  • @ayhan the content is still disputed. – double-beep Feb 16 at 21:01
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    @double-beep: In what way is the content "still disputed"? It was closed and then reopened, but that's decidedly different from the content being disputed via edits. – Nicol Bolas Feb 16 at 21:13
  • @NicolBolas the question is closed and then reopened. – double-beep Feb 16 at 21:14
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    @double-beep: That's not what "content is disputed" is meant for. – Nicol Bolas Feb 16 at 21:15
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    @NicolBolas I think this is called content dispute; see this question. The current is exactly the same. – double-beep Feb 16 at 21:17
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    @double-beep: No, that's a moderator using their moderator powers to enforce that a clearly off-topic question remain closed. That's different from what you're talking about. – Nicol Bolas Feb 16 at 21:19
  • @double-beep: You also seem to misunderstand what a lock would actually do. It would make the post uneditable, and make it impossible to post new answers. It would be very similar to closing the question, only people can't reopen it. Is that what you really want? – Nicol Bolas Feb 16 at 21:21
  • @NicolBolas yep. – double-beep Feb 16 at 21:23
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As everyone can see from the history, I'm the moderator who originally applied a content lock to that question. I did so because there was a delete war occurring on the primary answer. This was discussed extensively in the comments on the Meta Q&A. I'm not going to rehash that here. The summary is, I had a good reason for locking it at the time (the person who posted the answer was trying to remove the answer because they felt attacked by the community), but now that problem has been addressed: the person asked me to unlock it and promised they wouldn't try and vandalize it, I believed them, I unlocked it, and there haven't been any problems since.

Locks get applied by moderators to solve immediate problems. A content dispute lock is not warranted just because the post is being discussed on Meta. We use that lock to stop people from vandalizing the post (e.g., removing its content, editing in spam), engaging in delete/rollback wars, having noisy extended debates in the comments, or other types of things that are extremely disruptive and harmful. That isn't happening here, so there is no point in having it locked.

It's also worth pointing out that, even though I had a pretty good reason for locking it at the time, to solve an immediate problem, as described above, the decision to lock was not immediately obvious to everyone and was therefore itself controversial. A couple of people called me out about it on Meta, wondered why it was locked, and asked me to unlock it. With that reason completely obsolete, it would be really difficult to justify a lock on that question.

So, I declined this flag. Why, exactly, does this flagger want me to lock this again? Didn't we already do that? Hasn't the problem already been addressed? Did they not even bother to read the Meta discussion, or or are they just not aware of it? If they haven't seen the Meta discussion, how else did they find this question in order to flag it?

Frankly, reading the flag message, I was very confused about what you wanted to happen and why you wanted it. You said:

While this question was locked and unlocked after some time, the content of the question is still deputed [sic]. A Community Manager (Shog9) reviewed the question (in the close vote queue) and selected 'Leave Open'. The review can be found here: https://stackoverflow.com/review/close/22199031. Please lock the post.

I've already addressed the first sentence. The rest of the flag, though, is self-contradictory. You make the point that Shog9 indicated the question should remain open via review, and then you ask me to lock the post. Why would locking be appropriate for a post that a CM thinks should be left open?

(Also, just because Shog9 kicked the post out of the review queue doesn't mean that he was trying to make an official decision regarding the post's appropriateness for Stack Overflow. Don't read too much into that. Again, we are discussing this on Meta; that is the appropriate way to handle Q&A where the suitability and/or topicality are in dispute.)

And more broadly, I want to echo, underscore, and set in bold what Nicol Bolas said:

Since a lock has similar effects as closing, you're essentially asking the moderators to pick a side, to unilaterally resolve the debate in your favor.
[ . . . ]
Let the debate play out, allow a resolution to be reached, and don't try to draft the referees to call the game before it's done.

I'd make it <blink> if I could. It's actually even worse than Nicol suggests, because the effects of a lock are far worse than closing. Closure can be undone by the community, a closed question can still be edited, etc. Locked means...locked. It's the nuclear strategy.

Please don't try and use flags this way to "enforce" a conclusion to a particular controversial issue, especially when the community is still active discussing it. Moderators do a fair job of keeping up with Meta discussions. We only step in to subvert discussion when there is a problem. Otherwise, if we have an opinion, we contribute in the Meta discussion by posting it as an answer, just like any other community member.

There was nothing here that a moderator needed to do anything about. A lock was completely inappropriate. I had absolutely no idea why you were bringing that question to our attention via a flag. If you have such a strong opinion about its disposition, you should post an answer to the Meta question about it. Your point of view is not so special that it should be immediately actioned directly by a moderator, bypassing and foreclosing all community review.

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    "If they haven't seen the Meta discussion, how else did they find this question in order to flag it?" Well, that VBA question was actually in the hot network questions list, so it got a lot of attention even before the discussion appeared on Meta. But regardless, the rest of the reasoning is plenty sound even with that detail, I don't have any quarrel with the way the flag was handled. – Davy M Feb 17 at 0:03
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    Hot Network Questions? Ah, geez. Was not aware of that, @Davy. Thanks for pointing that out. – Cody Gray Feb 17 at 0:07
  • Ok, I am confused now. In this question, I also raised a mod-flag asking them to lock the post, similar with this and was marked helpful. Why? Also, why did you lock the whole question and not just the answer? I think this is possible, isn't it? – double-beep Feb 17 at 10:24
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    You'll notice that question is now unlocked, @double, because the problematic activity (a close, re-open war) stopped occurring. You flagged a moderator to lock it because the Meta discussion was causing a close, re-open war (more than two times back-and-forth), and that's what someone did. Later, it was unlocked again. I see from deleted comments that you questioned that decision as well. Why are you so intent on locking questions? What problem are you trying to solve? What positive benefit do you think this provides? – Cody Gray Feb 17 at 19:35
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    Yes, we can lock individual answers. The reason I locked the whole Q&A, not just the answer, is because it was self-answered. If the person who was trying to delete the answer couldn't delete the answer, then they were probably just going to try and delete the question. I was trying really hard not to get into the details of what might have happened before, because the user involved just had a temporary lapse in judgment. I stepped in to avert it before any real damage could be done. That's what moderators do. I don't really want a big Meta discussion calling him out on it. – Cody Gray Feb 17 at 19:37
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Content disputes, as the name suggests, are disputes about the content of a post. The content of that post is (no longer) in dispute. What is disputed is whether it is a good question or not.

Posts don't get locked for that reason. Since a lock has similar effects as closing, you're essentially asking the moderators to pick a side, to unilaterally resolve the debate in your favor.

The question remaining opened for the time being, or even being closed and re-opened a few more times, does no real harm to the site. Let the debate play out, allow a resolution to be reached, and don't try to draft the referees to call the game before it's done.

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