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Yesterday I received a rather unhappy message via my email alias that is easily found from my Stack Overflow profile:

Subject: Stop editing other users questions

Hi,

what you are doing on SO is disgusting. Apparently you don't have anything else to do other than editing other users questions?? To be very clear - refrain from EVER touching one of my questions again unless you have useful input which I can see from your profile is quite rare.

Regards,

Last year I asked whether abusive off-platform messages should be reported to Stack Overflow, and the answer was yes. I followed that up with a report by email, and a team member said they would look into it.

I imagine the above message, while hardly constructive, does not rise to the level of warranting a platform ban. I will probably report it anyway, though, in case my charming friend is inclined to make a habit of this sort of behaviour.

I think there is value in making this sort of thing available to moderators, so that it can be taken into account when dealing with in-platform abuse and harassment. My grumpy interlocutor appears to have used their real name and email address, but my correspondent appears to be disinclined to identify their profile or the post(s) in question. I have done a bit of user hunting by name, but turned up naught.

If I make a report to Stack Overflow, will that information get fed to moderators? If not, do moderators have the ability to search for users by email or IP/timestamp, in order to attach a behaviour report privately to a user account?


Tempting though it is to include that information here, I am generally not in favour of doxxing people, even if at first glance it is felt to be richly deserved :-).

  • 53
    The question I have for your interlocutor is... if he doesn't tell you who he is... how are you expected to not edit them anymore? seems kinda silly -_- – Patrice Feb 11 at 23:13
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    @Patrice: heh, yes. I corresponded with him a bit, and asked for examples of what had particularly upset him. Sadly, answers came there none! – halfer Feb 11 at 23:15
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    @Patrice If you forward their mail to a CM in an email report, I'm sure they could link the email to the account. I doubt anything will be done though. A warning at most. – cs95 Feb 11 at 23:16
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    That's the good thing about disliking such users like the one who wrote the email: you don't have hard feelings using their mail to register new accounts on a few dodgy sites. At least I wouldn't have problems doing that. But I obviously can't (officially) recommend that behaviour :P. – Tom Feb 11 at 23:16
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    @coldspeed 100% with you. I am just trying to think of it from the perspective of that person. What's their intent there? "STOP EDITING MY POSTS. I WON'T TELL YOU WHO I AM BUT YOU BETTER STOP". That's... silly on its face imho – Patrice Feb 11 at 23:22
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    if you and Peter Mortensen stop editing posts then SO will be a big mess ... So continue doing this! – Temani Afif Feb 11 at 23:57
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    "Regards" after that message haha – Don't Panic Feb 12 at 1:30
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    Ugh, @halfer, this sucks. I'm sorry you are enduring it. Sadly, this is just what one has to endure sometimes on any social platform, whether it's Twitter or SO. Hopefully SO has better policing than some others. – Kirk Woll Feb 12 at 3:13
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    @KirkWoll: I get one a year, and it's cool. Thank you, though. I am lucky in the sense that I am (mostly) able to make a philosophical and analytical reaction rather than an emotional one. Strangely, I felt some strange compassion for my interlocutor - it must be genuinely dreadful to experience such overpowering outrage set off by such a small trigger. – halfer Feb 12 at 8:56
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    @Patrice in fairness, the recommendation is to stop editing anything. This particular user's posted content is merely part of the whole. I'm not saying this is good advice but that it is not inconsistent or (internally) illogical from the way it's presented. – VLAZ Feb 12 at 14:11
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    One word of advice that doesn't seem to have been mentioned here yet (I have also had a couple of whinging emails over the years) is: Do not, under any circumstance, reply to the email. There's almost zero chance that will have any positive outcome. – DavidG Feb 12 at 14:12
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    @Patrice "Subject: Stop editing other users questions" – VLAZ Feb 12 at 14:22
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    The funniest part : ..which I can see from your profile is quite rare to a > 14 K user.. – iLuvLogix Feb 12 at 14:46
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    Paff, that's nothing. I had a guy try to get me fired because I snarked on his meta question. Stalked me, too, to collect evidence I might "shoot up the company". You need to raise your game. – Will Feb 12 at 18:35
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    @Will: you've quite outclassed me there ;-) – halfer Feb 12 at 18:53
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Are off-site abusive messages reported to Stack Overflow fed into the moderation system? [...] If I make a report to Stack Overflow, will that information get fed to moderators?

No, not automatically.

However, the Stack Exchange employees (i.e., Community Team) to which you would report such things could manually add an annotation in a private area where moderators could see it when making decisions about how to handle disruptive user actions.

I imagine the above message, while hardly constructive, does not rise to the level of warranting a platform ban. [...] I think there is value in making this sort of thing available to moderators, so that it can be taken into account when dealing with in-platform abuse and harassment.

No, I don't think so, either. However, this combined with on-site behaviors would possibly justify skipping the customary warning and going straight to a suspension. That's why more information is better, as you said.

If not, do moderators have the ability to search for users by email or IP/timestamp, in order to attach a behaviour report privately to a user account?

Uhh, we have a few different kinda search-y thingadongdongs. Plus our brains. When you've been around a while, you know what to watch out for and you come to recognize patterns.

My grumpy interlocutor appears to have used their real name and email address†, but my correspondent appears to be disinclined to identify their profile or the post(s) in question. I have done a bit of user hunting by name, but turned up naught.

Don't do the hunting yourself. Let the Stack Exchange employees do it. Not only do they have more information available to them than is available to you (or even to moderators), but also they're in a better position to deal with any possible consequences/retaliation.

If ever you feel threatened or harassed by off-site communications for actions you took on Stack Overflow, definitely forward the email to the Stack Exchange community team, along with a summary of your concerns. Don't expect visible action to be taken, but know that the team does take these things seriously, and will deal with them internally as necessary.

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    I regret to inform you that, due to the last round of "Summer of Love" negotiations, the term "thingadongdong" is now considered offensive, and you're no longer allowed to use it. – Robert Harvey Feb 12 at 5:12
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    It turns out most of what I say is considered offensive after the last round of "Summer of Love", @Robert. You can't please everyone. – Cody Gray Feb 12 at 5:26
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    Alright, nice one, thanks. I will ping it to the community team as you suggest. Optionally, if you want to open a private chat with me (otherwise known as a thingadongdong) I can post the full email and headers. I will suggest to the CT that it gets fed into the private area too. – halfer Feb 12 at 8:52
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    "When you've been around a while, you know what to watch out for and you come to recognize patterns." Do you folks also consume melange for increased prescience? ;) – E_net4 Feb 12 at 8:55
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    @E_net4 No, but diamond moderators are supplied with Sapho juice . On the condition that they'll remember it is only a tool, and that will alone sets their mind in motion :-) – S.L. Barth Feb 12 at 14:24
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    I consume a twice-daily dose of Meta. It has some mild prescience effects, but probably reduces lifespan and vitality. @E_net4 – Cody Gray Feb 12 at 17:54
  • With all the respect, but what is a thingadongdong? – meJustAndrew Feb 14 at 12:25
  • @meJustAndrew It's a meme from the really early days of Stack Overflow. It's been so long, I can't even remember who first coined the term, but all the old-timers have been using it ever since for humorous effect. It is a completely made-up nonsense word that just means "thing". – Cody Gray Feb 14 at 17:12
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Given that anonymous email services are a thing, the best you can hope for is that the person had such a problem with you editing their posts that they used the same email address as they did for Stack Overflow when demanding that you stop editing their posts.

Otherwise, absolutely; I would forward this along to Stack Overflow anyway since this isn't acceptable behavior.

  • This comment could just as well go on the question (but it fits here): I just wanted to add that even if they used the same email address, that only proves it to you (not to StackOverflow), unless StackOverflow owns the email server. Also, in both cases, the emails could be purposefully spoofed to get people into trouble; so, you'd need to research the headers and see if you can prove that the message is from the right person. If StackExchange had a messaging system, that would solve all these problems, though (but I'm guessing it's purposeful that they don't have one). – Shule Feb 12 at 3:48
  • @Shule What about chat? It isn't private (so the emailer wouldn't use it), but it is a thing. I would count it as a "messaging system", though. Were you talking about a private messaging system? – Eb946207 Feb 12 at 3:51
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    @Shule So, what you're saying is, we should introduce a system to allow people to send abusive messages to our users, that way we can better monitor those abusive messages? Seems kinda like missing the point. – Cody Gray Feb 12 at 4:49
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    @Shule: it'd be hard to spoof the right details, IMO. Email addresses can often be trivially found for developers, but getting an IP address that matches a range used by that person is another matter. I expect Stack Overflow would want to be sure before taking an action. – halfer Feb 12 at 9:13
  • Because I get the feeling this discussion could get tangential and lengthy, and hence totally hijack the comments of this person's answer, which answer I'll admit I upvoted, here's a link to a chat where you can see and respond to my replies: chat.stackoverflow.com/rooms/188271/tangential-comments – Shule Feb 12 at 11:45
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While I am not aware of the details of Stackoverflow policy, punitive actions on the site should not be taken for bad behavior off the site. A ban from Stackoverflow will not stop bad behavior via email and may only encourage it. Also, thick skin is in order. A tolerance for some minor rudeness is a sign of a healthy community that has strength and resilience.

Given that, I think this falls squarely into "Delete the email and get on with your life."

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    I do not think that "censorship" is an appropriate word here. My interlocutor is still perfectly at liberty to send abuse via email, and being restricted from Stack Overflow will do nothing to interfere with his freedom to send email. – halfer Feb 12 at 23:39
  • I deleted that part, on second thought I don't think it was clearly stated or relevant. – sakurashinken Feb 12 at 23:46
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    "punitive actions on the site should not be taken for bad behavior off the site" They shouldn't be, indeed, and they aren't. But a bit of context is always useful when interpreting actions taken on the site. See my answer for details. In this case, I think you are probably right. This email isn't particularly threatening, just wrong-headed, and could just be ignored. But the larger point stands, that if you receive a message off-site regarding your activity on the site, you can always send it to the SE community team for assistance. This one isn't, but some of them are. You'd be surprised. – Cody Gray Feb 13 at 0:12
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    I'd argue that whilst this action was taken off-site, it was clearly made about the site and about actions that took place on-site. As such it's more than reasonable to consider punitive action here. This also goes far beyond "minor rudeness". An appropriate analogy would be you falling out with a customer at work and then you deciding to abuse them via your personal email in your own time. Technically, this isn't a work issue as it took place in your own email (off-platform) but you could still expect to be fired as it was about work business. – Persistence Feb 13 at 15:08
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    The main purpose of the email (and many others in the same vein) is not the request to avoid editing some questions - I think that is secondary. The point is to inflict an emotional injury on the recipient of the message, and like physical assault, I think such behaviour merits some sort of consequence. I'm in favour of kind and moderate solutions if they work - perhaps just a moderator having a quiet word. My intent here is to discourage the author from sending other things like this to other people. – halfer Feb 13 at 19:24

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