18

Was surprised to see that this question was closed and locked.

I read this...

When is it OK to ask shell scripting questions on SO?

...and I agree that questions on interactive shell usage is better off in, for example, unix.SE, but this question I would say OP seems to attempt to automate something. (At least that's what I was trying to do when I stumbled across it.)

Since it's locked I can't even edit the question to make it more fit for SO, and I can't vote to reopen.

So, is this a valid close/lock, or should it be given another chance? I'd be happy to rework the text to put the question in a scripting context.

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    Sounds like an edge case. One could argue the question is asking about a problem that's not unique to software development, and thus it doesn't meet the criteria outlined in on-topic. Not going to answer since I'm very unsure here, the question might have a history I'm unaware of. – Erik A Feb 7 at 10:32
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    What would be the advantage of unlocking it? Are there any new answers that should be added? Is there any major edit necessary? If not, then the lock serves quite good. If we unlock and reopen it, then someone has to monitor whether the question gets closed again. – BDL Feb 7 at 10:53
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    @BFL, I could upvote the answer that works best in my case. I can improve the text of the question. I can add clarifying comments. Why would someone have to monitor whether the question gets closed? – aioobe Feb 7 at 10:56
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    @BDL More than the usefulness of having it open, it's important to note that the question has no reason of being closed in the first place, that alone being enough reason to unlock and reopen. That would let people upvote good answers and the question itself, downvote bad ones, even add something new if a new technique surfaces in the future (like has happened in many other questions before). Also, having a closed and locked questions might make people doubt the validity of the answers. About "monitoring", if it receives close votes, the review queues would deal with it. – Alejandro Feb 7 at 17:24
  • Probably the only person who can give you an answer is the mod who locked that question, and since the lock was applied nearly half a decade ago I doubt they'd remember. Personally, I'd ask and self-answer a new question with the specific scenario that you needed when you found that question. – Ian Kemp Feb 7 at 18:00
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    @IanKemp, that would almost certainly be regarded as a duplicate, regardless how I frame it. I would much rather have this question reopened and avoid unnecessary dups. – aioobe Feb 7 at 18:03
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    I can't really see why that post is a candidate for a historical lock. On the other hand, I'm not entirely convinced that it is on-topic. It looks more like a general command-line *nix usage question, rather than something specific to shell scripting. Sure, a shell script is interpreted by the command processor, so anything you can do a terminal, you can do in a shell script. But do we really want to allow all *nix usage questions, just because they could theoretically be related to shell scripting? – Cody Gray Feb 7 at 19:27
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    @CodyGray Well if the comments here are any indication, if you unlock it, it'll get reopened. Just something to keep in mind. – Servy Feb 7 at 22:18
  • @CodyGray, in this case I was solving a scripting problem, so I don't think it's a "theoretical situation" where someone happens to put a general *nix command in a script. Just because a command can be used for non-programming purposes doesn't mean it's off topic. Compare for instance with Sublime Text 2 - View whitespace characters and How to resolve merge conflicts in Git, both very well received by the community. – aioobe Feb 8 at 9:25
  • @aioobe "Just because a command can be used for non-programming purposes doesn't mean it's off topic" actually, that's what makes it off topic: but if your question generally covers… [...] a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development – Braiam Feb 8 at 15:03
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    @Braiman, would you say that showing whitespace characters in sublime or resolving merge conflicts in git are unique to software development? Personally I've used sublime and git for writing and collaborating on papers (in latex) more than I have used them for programming. I stand by my claim. Some things are programming related and fits SO even though they can be used in other contexts too. Shell commands commonly used in scripts fall in this category if you ask me. – aioobe Feb 8 at 15:56
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    In my opinion, the question is on-topic for SO. It is about how to write a shell script. It isn't directly couched in terms of a shell script, but it is more than plausible that the objective is to get a full list of file names for use in some more shell code. The answers seem good; several have considerable up-votes. I'm not at all convinced it should have been closed 'off-topic'. There was a period (somewhere about the time this got closed, give or take a year or two) when some people got horribly itchy fingers about closing shell-related questions as OT. They're not OT in my opinion. – Jonathan Leffler Feb 8 at 18:14
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    Even if it doesn't look enough like a scripting question right now (which is already debatable), it could definitely be edited into an explicit scripting question that is clearly on-topic for SO. – John Y Feb 8 at 18:51
7

I was originally unconvinced that the question was on-topic. I didn't have a strong opinion either way: I wouldn't have voted to close it, but I wasn't sure that I should re-open it, either.

However, the discussion in the comments has served to convince me that the question is on-topic, or at least that it could be made so with a few minor edits. Jonathan Leffler's comment was ultimately the most persuasive:

In my opinion, the question is on-topic for SO. It is about how to write a shell script. It isn't directly couched in terms of a shell script, but it is more than plausible that the objective is to get a full list of file names for use in some more shell code. The answers seem good; several have considerable up-votes. I'm not at all convinced it should have been closed 'off-topic'. There was a period (somewhere about the time this got closed, give or take a year or two) when some people got horribly itchy fingers about closing shell-related questions as OT. They're not OT in my opinion.

In particular, his observation that the answers are of high quality. There are no glaring problems with this question or the answers it has and may attract that could serve to justify a historical lock. Providing this information, and letting the community curate it, serves our goal of making the Internet a better place.

As such, I've unlocked and re-opened it.

I also made some excessively trivial edits to get the words "shell scripting" in there. If someone who is more of an expert than me can make it clearer that this is on-topic for Stack Overflow, please be my guest.


Nota Bene: I'm sure that some folks will disagree with my action here. Please express your disagreement by posting an answer to this question, rather than by embarking on a close-delete war on the main site. If the pendulum of consensus swings the other way, I will be happy to reverse my own action as dictated by the community. But close-delete wars serve no one, at least in part because there is no way to make an actual argument defending your viewpoint.

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    While I'm happy with the decision to unlock/reopen the question, I find it strange that you use the quality of the answers as motivation. I would have thought a question that lacked good answers would be in "bigger need" for reopen. – aioobe Feb 8 at 20:37
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    @aioobe That was less a justification for re-opening than a justification for removing the historical lock. Locks were designed to address severe quality issues, without destroying potential value. I don't see the "severe quality issues" here, so I unlocked. And then, following Servy's logic above, once it's unlocked, why not re-open, since it is apparently on-topic? – Cody Gray Feb 8 at 20:39
  • Ah, gotcha..... – aioobe Feb 8 at 21:18
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    @aioobe: See pearls vs. sand. Questions are cheap, literally anyone can ask them. It's good answers that are valuable and worth preserving. If the question had not had any answers of any value, it would've been easier to just delete it and let you re-ask it in your own (hopefully clearer and more obviously on-topic) words. In fact, if it didn't have any good answers, the moderator who originally locked the question probably would've just deleted it back then instead. – Ilmari Karonen Feb 10 at 0:59

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